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Tibet 2008: Reported Unrest and Related Incidents

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This database presents the current status of knowledge about the unrest that has occurred in Tibet during 2008, using all available Tibetan, Chinese and Western sources.

Despite an unprecedented flow of information from Tibet, sources vary significantly in quality, accuracy, substance and comprehensiveness, and are partly contradictory. This presents a need to establish facts as far as possible. Incidents marked in red are those TibetInfoNet has so far been able to confirm. This database is a work in progress and is regularly updated. New features and search facilities will be made available in the near future in order to facilitate further research.

We welcome your suggestions and any additional information. Please contact us here.


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  Monday, 22 December 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Ngawang Tsering, born in Mepa town, Markham County, Chamdo Prefecture, TAR, was admitted to hospital in Lhasa on 13 March; doctors said he was in need of a blood transfusion.
However, [in response to events on 14 March], the Chinese government “issued strict orders that the army needed blood and no one should donate blood to Tibetans” [quotation of CTA]. Despite repeated appeals, “no one came forward to give blood to Ngawang Tenzin”.
He subsequently died in hospital (not confirmed whether the TAR People’s hospital or Lhasa Municipality People’s hospital).
[Note: CTA does not provide a date of when Ngawang Tsering died.]
(reported by CTA, 22 December 2008)

  Friday, 12 December 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: Departments in Lhasa have started monitoring private Tibetan schools; the authorities are also planning to shut down many of the schools.
(reported by CTA, 12 December 2008)

  Wednesday, 10 December 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The Chinese government imposed heavy restrictions [in Lhasa] by posting a large number of armed personnel around the Tibetan capital of Lhasa to prevent unrest during the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, on 10 December; an “additional supply of arms and ammunition [were provided] to some of the Chinese forces to reinforce clampdown on the Tibetan people”. Lhasa city appeared as ‘war zone’; armed personnel [had] built up six barricades on the street in front of the Potala palace; movement of Tibetans restricted around Bharkor Square; heavily armed Chinese militarily issued warnings to local residents to remain inside their homes.
At an intersection “near Lhasa”, armed personnel frisked people coming from the western region of Chushul [Chushur] and Toelung [Toelung Dechen].
The security measures disturbed normal life in Lhasa.
The Chinese police are provided with five different kinds of dress, including monks’ robes and street cleaners’ uniform.
(reported by CTA, 12 December 2008)

  Monday, 01 December 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

The Chinese authorities are keeping close vigil on private schools and small health centres in Karze [Kardze] to hinder dedicated Tibetans who are carrying out welfare projects, due to suspicions of political motives behind such activities. On 1 December, sources in Tibet “reported about a decree to shut down the most prestigious and recognised educational and health institutions in Karze” [Kardze], including “the hospital and school owned by Khangsar Kyabgyon Tulku and Lamdag Tulku hospital and Karze Intermediary Tibetan language school”. Expressing concern and disappointment, parents and other Tibetan residents have voluntarily approached the authorities and submitted petitions appealing to them not to close schools and hospitals.
(reported by CTA, 12 December 2008)

  Sunday, 30 November 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Since the beginning of November, some Tibetans were arbitrarily arrested from their homes in Lhasa by “a joint team of Chinese secret agents and [PSB officials]”. The reason for these arrests is not clear; those arrested remain in “protective custody” [sic].
[Note: CTA reported this on 12/12/08, but the news item followed details of a protest which occurred on 22 November. It is unclear if the arbitrary arrests described here were conducted ‘since’ the beginning of November until 22 November, until the end of November, or until the date of the report, 12/12/08. Therefore, this information has been entered under 30 November as an approximate date, to encompass the month of November.]
(reported by CTA, 12 December 2008)

  Friday, 28 November 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Woeser monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

PSB officials arrested Khenpo Jampa Gyaltsen, the abbot of Woeser monastery.
(reported by CTA, 22 December 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Jampa Lhamo, aged 45, born in Khyungpo Tengcheng [Dengchen (Chin: Dingqing)] county, Chamdo Prefecture, TAR, and a permanent resident of Ramoche, Lhasa, “was severely tortured since her detention on 29 March”. At the time of her release [CTA does not provide a date], she was in a debilitating condition due to torture; her health failed to improve despite undergoing medical treatment. She died on 28 November 2008.
(reported by CTA, 22 December 2008)

  Monday, 24 November 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Paramilitary police with riot shields, batons, abruptly took up posts on [Labrang’s] main street on 24 November, disrupting the bustle of Buddhist pilgrims. Residents said they did not know what was happening. The government is “adjusting tactics”. Police checkpoints and guard posts in place for months are “suddenly dismantled, only to reappear without warning days later”. The show of force in Xiahe [Tib: Labrang] came after several weeks in which riot squads had rarely been seen on the streets; intended to deter unrest while a local court sentenced an unspecified number of Tibetans for taking part in large anti-government protests in Xiahe [Labrang] during March. Helmeted police with truncheons and six-foot-long poles stood outside the courthouse and government buildings. Verdicts were not publicly announced. The trial seemed timed to [coincide with the conclusion of exiled leaders’ meetings in India], called to discuss the policy of rapprochement with China after 50 years in exile.
At a checkpoint, uniformed officers studied identification papers, stopped all but a few dozen vehicles from entering the town. Cars were cleared from the streets and people hurried past armed guards.
Foreign visitors have been barred from the region for much of the past seven months; this restriction lifted in Xiahe a month ago, although many other Tibetan areas remain closed.
(reported by AP, 24 November 2008)

  Sunday, 23 November 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Shitsang monastery (Chin: Xicang), Luchu county (Chin:Luqu xian)

Xicang [Tib: Shitsang] monastery, site of a violent demonstration in March, was open again for visitors, but tense. Senior clerics finished leading midday teachings in the main hall and “immediately shuffled to another meeting – a rollout of a new government-ordered study session”.
About 90 monks sat in the courtyard beside a red banner with white Tibetan and Chinese writing: “Work Meeting for the Second Phase of Xicang Monastery’s Rule of Law Propaganda Education Campaign”. Such mandatory campaigns – which stress that religion must never veer into political action – have been used repeatedly to keep the clergy in line.
(reported by AP, 24 November 2008)

  Saturday, 22 November 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Morning: four Tibetan nuns and an unknown number of Tibetan youths raised Tibetan independence slogans around the Bharkor Square in Lhasa. As soon as the protest began, the protesters were severely beaten up and taken into custody by the Chinese police.
(reported by CTA, 12 December 2008)

  Thursday, 20 November 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

At around 5pm, a Tibetan youth aged around 20 years shouted Tibetan independence slogans in Lhasa; he was brutally beaten and arrested by PSB officials.
(reported by CTA, 22 December 2008)

  Monday, 17 November 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Luchu county (Luqu Xian)

Week beginning 17 November: A series of trials of Tibetans who took part in the “March rebellion”. In Luqu [Tib: Luchu], a town of 7,000 where monks from Xicang [Shitsang monastery] “tossed stones at local government offices”, the court sentenced four people; a court officer refused to disclose the verdicts.
(reported by AP, 24 November 2008)

  Tuesday, 04 November 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Jigme Gyatso (lay name Jigme Guri), a senior monk at Labrang monastery, was re-arrested after he described how he had been tortured by the police during his detention in March. He is now in custody in Lanzhou, Gansu province.
(reported by HRW, 05 December 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The Courier-Mail [Australia] was among the first foreign news outlets allowed into Tibet since the March uprising.
China has intensified its military presence in Lhasa amid fears that ‘separatist’ supporters of the Dalai Lama plan a repeat of the March riots; the authorities fear a militant uprising by Tibetan youth seeking independence. Military personnel with machine guns are conducting routine patrols around the Barkhor district; snipers are positioned on rooftops and stairwells. During a four-day visit, Australian journalists also witnessed monks being bundled into a police van close to the Jokhang temple. On 4 November, Bai Ma Cai Wang [Tib: Pema Tsewang], Vice-Governor of the TAR government told the Australian visitors that the military and police presence had been “moderately adjusted” in recent days because of “separatist activities”.
Up to 200 were killed and more than 1,300 Tibetans were arrested during the unrest in March.
Bai Ma confirmed that 55 Tibetans had been sentenced to jail terms ranging from three years to life after the March riots, which flared after monks staged peaceful protests. Tibet’s economy had been seriously damaged; tourism dropped from about 4.5 million visitors in 2007 to just 400,000 this year.
Bai Ma said: “The Tibetan people enjoy full rights in terms of management of their own affairs”.
Several monks said China had ‘bugged’ some of the city’s key tourist sites, such as the Potala Palace, to eavesdrop on potential troublemakers.
Every Chinese or Tibetan official The Courier-Mail spoke to, in Lhasa and Beijing, spoke derisively of the Dalai Lama. Mr Bai Ma said: “The image of the Dalai Lama as spiritual leader in the Tibet people’s minds has already gone away”.
(reported by Courier Mail, 06 November 2008)

XInhua reported that Baema Cewang, vice chairman of the Tibet regional government, told a visiting Australian parliamentarian that 55 people had so far been sentenced for the 14 March Lhasa riots; “Following the violence, police detained 1,317 people, of whom 1,115 were subsequently released. The rest stood trial”. Xinhua’s report did not detail the crimes or sentences of those convicted; nor did it say what had happened to the some 147 people apparently tried but not sentenced.
[Note: Reuters did not state the date of the meeting; 4 November was stated in a Courier Mail report by a visiting Australian journalist.]
(reported by Reuters, 05 November 2008)

  Monday, 03 November 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Jigme Guri (a.k.a. Jigme), a Labrang monastery monk was arbitrarily arrested “for unknown reason” [However, TCHRD refers to interviews that Jigme gave to foreign media, and stated that he had subsequently gone into hiding].
Around fifty Sangchu county PAP and PSB officials travelling in several military trucks arrived in Labrang at around 1pm; barged into a Tibetan home and arrested Jigme; taken away in a military vehicle; whereabouts unknown.
Jigme had previously been arrested on 22 March for his suspected role in 14 March Labrang protests; detained for two months; intensively interrogated, subjected to torture to extract a confession; left unconscious twice; released on medical grounds.
In September, VOA’s Tibetan service’s Wednesday programme, Kunleng, broadcast a video in which Jigme expressed Tibetans’ aspirations; gave accounts of torture and inhumane treatment inflicted on Labrang monks arrested for protesting in March.
In a telephone interview with AP on 12 September, Jigme gave a detailed account of the ongoing Chinese crackdown on Tibetans.
Jigme later went into hiding.
[Note: TCHRD’s home page dated the press release as 03/11/08; the press release page itself is dated 04/11/08. The date of Jigme Guri’s arrest – and the date of publication – is believed to be the former.]
(reported by TCHRD, 03 November 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Jigme Gyatso, a 42-year-old Tibetan monk who produced a video providing personal details of the Chinese crackdown in Tibetan monasteries this year, was arrested during the afternoon at Labrang monastery by more than 70 members of the PAP and PSB.
Jigme Gyatso had previously been arrested on 22 March; was severely beaten and held for a month; “on the verge of death” he was hospitalised, then allowed to return to Labrang monastery because police found no evidence to support their belief he was one of the organisers of protests [the article refers to protests in Lhasa, but Jigme Gyatso had reportedly been arrested in connection with protests in Labrang, not Lhasa, on 14 March]. Jigme Gyatso had not been involved in protests this year because he had already been detained by the police several times, including once for 40 days after returning from a Buddhist ceremony in India in 2006.
Discharged from hospital and released and custody, Jigme Gyatso’s civil liberties were withdrawn for one year, including his freedom of speech. He secretly made his way to Beijing, where the video was produced; he did not try to hide his identity, despite knowing the risk involved.
The video was first broadcast on the VOA news website and YouTube on 3 September. Two days later the police launched a nationwide search for Jigme Gyatso, who had gone into hiding. His monastery room and his family home were monitored by police. Police lured him back to the monastery by saying they would not arrest him if he returned [note: TCHRD reported that Jigme Gyatse was arrested from a Tibetan home in Labrang].
(reported by The National, 04 November 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Marthang county (Chin: Hongyuan Xian)

Norzin Wangmo (Chin: Longzhen Wangmu), an employee of the Judicial Bureau of Hongyuan county, was sentenced on 3 November to five years of imprisonment after he told relatives abroad of the situation in Tibet.
(reported by HRW, 05 December 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The first visit to Tibet by any Australian journalists since the March 2008 unrest: Cameron Stewart of The Australian (online newspaper), News Limited journalist Steve Lewis, and federal Liberal MP Michael Johnson (vice-chairman of the Australia-China Parliamentary Friendship group), made a four-day visit at the invitation of the Chinese government.
Cameron Stewart described the ‘zero tolerance’ military presence in Lhasa: “As night falls, hundreds of Chinese troops fan out … armed with riot shields and assault rifles. They set up sentry posts on street corners and dispatch patrols in groups of six soldiers, three with shields and three with guns. These patrols spend the night walking down the lanes of Lhasa’s Tibetan quarter, looking for any sign of dissent. When the sun rises, the soldiers … are replaced by a new rotation of troops”.
During daytime, “snipers are installed on rooftops” around the Jokhang temple, watching over Tibetan pilgrims praying in Barkhor Square below. CCTV cameras have been installed on buildings [presumably in addition to those already in operation prior to 14 March]; plainclothes police are deployed as well large numbers of uniformed police and soldiers.
On Monday 3 November, the Australian visitors witnessed “a group of monks being placed in a police van and taken away but attempts to get an explanation were unsuccessful”.
The vice-governor of the TAR, Bai Ma Cai Wang [Tib: Pema Tsewang], told the Australian visitors: “In order for Tibet’s stability and for people’s safety and for people’s desire for security and order, the government has moderately adjusted the presence of the police force on the street”(China’s first public acknowledgment that it has beefed up its security forces in Tibet). The government fears a repeat of the March riots, according to Bai Ma: “After the 14 March riots, the Dalai Lama and his followers have speeded up their separatist activities”. But he also claimed: “The image of the Dalai Lama in Tibetan people’s minds has already gone away”.
Wang De Wen, of the Tibet People’s Congress, stated that 1,317 people were arrested following the 14 March riots. With regard to those arrested, the deputy secretary-general of the Tibet People’s Congress, Tonga, claimed: “After our re-education program most of them will regret what they have done – a relevant government official briefed them on what was right and what was wrong”.
The head of religious affairs of the TAR, Kalsang, denied reports in the West of monks being “required” to denounce the Dalai Lama as part of ‘patriotic education’ programs in monasteries.
Wang Jinjun conceded that monks in Tibet were being given “legal information programs” in which they were told not to mix religion with politics.
The itinerary did not include meetings with senior Buddhists and “no one whose views strayed from the official line”. A request to visit Drapchi prison was refused. But at night the journalists secretly met some Tibetans and heard alternative views, despite their fears of being overheard by the authorities. According to a monk, “sometimes (Barkhor) square is full of detectives listening in” and there have been “more and more soldiers” in Lhasa in recent weeks. Listening devices reportedly installed in the main tourist sites where Westerners might interact with Tibetans.
(reported by The Australian, 08 November 2008)

  Friday, 31 October 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Paljor Norbu (Chin: Panjue Nuobu), an 81-year-old Tibetan traditional printer, was taken by the police from his home on suspicion that he had printed ‘prohibited material’ including the Tibetan flag.
Norbu was not granted even the minimal rights that are supposed to be provided under Chinese criminal procedures. Judicial authorities refused to inform his relatives that he was being detained, or to reveal the charges against him. He was tried in secret in November, without allowing him defence representation of his choice in court, and sentenced to seven years in prison. A letter was then hand-delivered to his family, informing them of the sentence, but not of where he will serve the prison term. His current whereabouts are unknown. The authorities have not made public the details of the verdict. The nature of the initial accusations and length of the sentence suggest that he was tried on charges of ‘inciting separatism’ (article 103 of the Criminal Law).
Paljor Norbu’s workshop employed several dozen workers and printed Buddhist texts for monasteries, prayer flags, folk reproductions, books, leaflets, and traditional literature. After Norbu’s arrest, the police closed his shop, affixed notices of official closure on the door, prohibited employees from returning, and confiscated books and woodblocks from the shop’s collection.
(reported by HRW, 05 December 2008)

  Wednesday, 29 October 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

Sherab Sangpo, a 26-year old monk of Dongthog monastery in Kardze county, was taken to Kardze Intermediate People’s Court in Dartsedo at around 8.30am. The judges’ verdict was declared around noon: Sherab Sangpo was sentenced to six years’ imprisonment on charges of “endangering state security”. He had raised a hand-drawn Tibetan national flag during a protest in Kardze on 26 March.
Loga, a Tibetan from Kardze, was given a three-year jail term for his participation in “the March protest in Kardze” [it is assumed the 26 March protest].
It is not known whether or not Sherab Sangpo and Loga were allowed personal attorneys to defend them.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 November 2008)

Two Tibetans, named Ngoega and Norbu Tsering, who had participated in a political demonstration on 18 March at Kardze county headquarters were taken to Kardze Intermediate People’s Court in Dartsedo at around 9am on 30 October.
Severe restrictions outside the court; a heavy presence of security guards throughout the proceedings. A Tibetan translator was present; around 20 people, mostly Chinese, gathered for the verdict, given at around noon:

  1. Ngoega, 53-year-old from Serchu village, Kardze county; sentenced to eight years on charges of “endangering state security”.
  2. Norbu Tsering, 49-year-old from Drukhang village, Kardze county; sentenced to nine years on charges of “endangering state security”.

Norbu Tsering had been held incommunicado since 18 March; no information on his whereabouts until the trial.
TCHRD reported: “no opportunity was given to [the defendants] to question the court verdict”. Ngoega retorted the judges’ verdict: “We did not commit any crimes of destroying or burning public properties rather we were involved only in distributing pamphlets on Tibetan cause. For that act I suffered torture, inhuman and degrading treatment at the hands of security personnel that I regain my body sensation only days after my transferred to the prison”.
In accordance with Chinese criminal law, the court granted the defendants the right to appeal within ten days. Such appeals are invariably unsuccessful, especially in cases where defendants are charged with political crimes. Ngoega’s family had been denied the opportunity to put forward their case on his behalf during his detention and felt it would be futile to attempt to appeal.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 November 2008)

  Tuesday, 28 October 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

A Tibetan from Sertha county, Kardze TAP, whose identity could not be ascertained was sentenced to ten years’ imprisonment by Kardze Intermediate People’s Court in Dartsedo.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 November 2008)

  Saturday, 18 October 2008
  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Yulung, Chentsa county

CTA summarised a Tibetan Solidarity Committee press release: Lhundrub, a seventeen-year-old Tibetan male from Yulung town, a student at the intermediate school in Chentsa district, committed suicide at around 4pm by jumping off the roof of the three-storey school building. He was reportedly very well-mannered, and one of the school’s best students. He left a suicide note addressed to his parents, teachers and fellow students, saying that he was killing himself not for personal reasons but to prove that Tibetans are deprived of freedom and basic human rights in their homeland; and expressed his hope that Tibetans would consistently struggle for the freedom of the Tibetan people. To his teachers and schoolmates, Lhundrub said they should work hard for the preservation of Tibetan identity and language. The Chinese authorities “have imposed strict surveillance on the school”.
(reported by CTA, 30 October 2008)

  Thursday, 25 September 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » [Kanlho TAP]

Date unspecified, circa 25 September 2008: On the edge of Tibetan towns in Gansu province, special police officers carrying rifles stand guard behind checkpoints made of sandbags; convoys of police vehicles drive up and down the streets; security personnel stop shoppers and question them. A Tibetan [possibly in Gannan town] would only speak behind the relative security of closed doors: “There are military personnel on every corner of the street. We don’t have any freedom at all. Life is very difficult right now”. He added that Tibetans want more freedom and the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet.
A farmer, sat on a hillside near the village of Yumo, told a BBC journalist: “It hasn’t returned to normal yet [following demonstrations during spring 2008]. They’ve released some of the people from prison, but not all of them”. He dismissed China’s claims that the Dalai Lama is responsible for the unrest: “We rose up on our own because there are no human rights here”. He said the local government handed out 3,000 yuan ($440; £240) compensation to every citizen after the March unrest, which the BBC reports could be a bid to quieten the population.
The BBC’s visit to Gannan prefecture coincided with a three-day investigation tour by a national committee in charge of minorities and religious affairs; a document circulated amongst the delegates covers the area’s potential for hydroelectricity and tourism.
(reported by BBC, 25 September 2008)

  Wednesday, 24 September 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A monk left Kirti monastery “having obtained the relevant permission from the monastery authorities”; upon returning a short time before dark, he was stopped by Chinese armed police and badly beaten; he returned to the monastery despite bleeding from his injuries. Subsequently, fifty monks went to a police station that is “situated in the immediate vicinity of the monastery” [presumably the monastery’s police station] and argued with the police, demanding an explanation. Police told the “protesting monks” that they would call “local authorities” to discuss the matter. Shortly afterwards, two truckloads of armed police arrived at the police station; they immediately “started to beat the monks at the police station, even though the monks had refrained from becoming violent on the arrival of the police”.
Four of the monks were “beaten so badly that they had to be hospitalised”, although FTC “has not been able to confirm where the monks are hospitalised”; however, the “four who were hospitalised are high-ranking monks at Kirti monastery”. One of them “could be the abbot of Kirti, although this could not be confirmed immediately. Communication with monks at the monastery has been impossible today and it has not been possible to confirm the name of the monk who was initially beaten, nor the names of the four monks that were hospitalised later”.
(reported by FTC, 25 September 2008)

Kirti monastery is surrounded by Chinese armed police; nine checkpoints, each surrounded by a fence, positioned around the perimeter of the monastery; between ten and fifteen police at each checkpoint. A separate line has been drawn around the perimeter of the monastery beyond the checkpoints; monks are forbidden to move beyond the perimeter without permission.
Further to FTC’s press release of 25/09/08, the monk who was reportedly beaten by Chinese police upon returning to Kirti monastery on 24 September has been named as Jimpa Ladja. He had left the monastery buildings to go to the toilet but “had not gone beyond the outer perimeter of the monastery”; he was stopped by armed police at one of the checkpoints while walking back to the monastery; accused of walking beyond the perimeter; badly beaten by police, despite his persistent denials that he had crossed the outer perimeter.
Jimpa Ladja then walked to a restaurant owned by Kirti monastery, where approximately 50 monks were eating. Jimpa Ladja was bleeding; told the other monks that he had been beaten; two of the monks immediately went to the police station situated to the north of Kirti to demand to know why Jimpa Ladja had been beaten. At the police station, “Chinese armed personnel” threatened the monks, “firing live rounds into the sky and into the ground in front of the monks”; the monks “ran back to the restaurant, chased by Chinese armed police who demanded that Ladja leave the restaurant immediately”. Two “separate monks” at the restaurant protested to the armed police that it was unreasonable to punish monks for leaving the monastery to go to the toilet; asked the police to “call their superiors to settle the problem”. Soon after a police officer made a telephone call, two truckloads of police arrived at the monastery, armed with with “rifles, spades and meat choppers”. The monks “lay on the ground, and even removed their garments to show the police that they were not armed”; however, the police “beat the monks severely, using the butts of their rifles, spades and even the meat choppers”. Five “of the 50 monks” were hospitalised at the civil hospital in Ngaba town:

  1. Lama Sotse.
  2. Rabgye (suffered particularly severe injuries).
  3. Tsang Chopel (suffered particularly severe injuries).
  4. Labchoek.
  5. Lophel.

On 26 September only Lama Sotse remained in the hospital; the whereabouts of the other four monks is presently unknown.
(reported by FTC, 26 September 2008)

  Tuesday, 23 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Chamdo (Chin: Qamdo/Changdu)

Eight monks convicted of staging a bomb attack in Tibet nearly seven months ago have been sentenced to prison. “They were convicted of causing the explosion at the government building of Xiangpi [Tib: Gyanbe/Kyabe] township”, Zhang Weilai, a judge at Chamdo Intermediate Court told AFP by phone. Zhang said one of the monks was sentenced to life in jail, but declined to say what jail terms the other seven received. The monks did not appeal.
China’s state-run press had previously reported that the monks from Thangkya (Chin: Tongxia) monastery had confessed to using home-made explosives to bomb a government building on 23 March; however, the Chinese press has given no details on the extent of the damage to the building, or whether anyone was injured or killed. China’s foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang insisted on Tuesday [14 October] the case had been handled according to the law.
[Note: AFP did not state the date of the trial; 23 September was stated as the trial date by FTC, 14/10/08.]
(reported by AFP, 14 October 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gyanbe township, Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Eight monks convicted of staging a bomb attack in Gyanbe township during March; trial held at the Chamdo Intermediate Court [see Chamdo, AFP 14/10/08].
(reported by AFP, 14 October 2008)

Eight monks convicted of bombing a government building in Gyanbe township during an anti-government uprising in March have been sentenced to prison, two of them for life. Gang Weilai, the judge who presided over the case at the People’s Court in Chamdo, said in a telephone interview: “We were first going to charge them with the crime of separating the nation, but eventually the charge was changed to the crime of causing an explosion”.
Gyurmey Dhondup and Kalsang Tsering were sentenced to life in prison while the others received sentences between five and 15 years. The monks did not appeal.
Gang refused to specify the trial date, saying only it happened “a few days ago”. [23 September was stated as the trial date by FTC, 14/10/08.]
(reported by AP, 14 October 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Thangkya (Ch: Tongxia) monastery, Gyanbe (Chin: Xiangpi), Gonjo county (Ch: Gongjue xian)

Eight monks were sentenced on 23 March by the Chamdo Prefecture People’s Court for allegedly staging a bomb attack on a government building in the Tibetan township of Gyanbe (official Tibetan spelling is ‘Kyabe’. Widespread media reports have referred to ‘Gyanbe’ (Chin: Xiangpi) township):

  1. Gyurmey Dhondup (Chin: Jinmei Dunzhu), aged 28; life imprisonment.
  2. Kalsang Tsering, aged 20; life imprisonment.
  3. Dorjee Wangyal (Chin: Duoji Wangjie), aged 31; 15 years imprisonment.
  4. Rinchen Gyaltsan (Chin: Renqing Jiangcun), aged 27; 10 years imprisonment.
  5. Tsewang Yeshi (Chin: Ciwang Yixi); 9 years imprisonment.
  6. Kunga Phuntsok (Chin: Genga Pingcuo), aged 19; 10 years imprisonment.
  7. Tsering Nyima, aged 21; 10 years imprisonment.
  8. Trinley Wanggyal, aged 21; 5 years imprisonment.

Three others had also been arrested in April for allegedly being connected to the bomb attack, but were not sentenced on 23 September:

  1. Tsering Wangdue, aged 17, a monk from Thangkya monastery; released.
  2. Sichod, aged 18, a monk from Thangkya monastery; “was not sentenced at Chamdo and was not imprisoned with the other eight monks at Gojo [Gonjo] County jail” [clarification: it is understood that Sichod ‘had not been detained’ at Gonjo county jail; the eight monks sentenced on 23 September in Chamdo had been detained in Gonjo ‘prior to’ their trials]. Sichod’s whereabouts/current status remains unknown.
  3. Tseten, aged 31, a layman who worked in a shop at Tongxia [Tib: Thangkya] monastery; still held in Gonjo county jail.

FTC’s source contests claims made by the People’s Daily on 14 April that those arrested had all confessed to the alleged crime. The legal proceedings have been “shrouded in complete secrecy”; the monks were denied all access to legal counsel and family from the time of arrest to sentencing. Relatives of the accused would usually be informed of the nature of the alleged charges [it is assumed that in this case the families were aware of the charges following Chinese media reports] and of the sentencing. Relatives had expected the monks to be released after the Beijing Olympic Games; relatives were not informed of the sentences. In a case concerning an alleged bombing, the convicted would usually be sentenced in a public court; the nature of the charges and the eventual sentencing has not been made public by the court.
Xinhua claimed the bomb blast occurred on 23 March, but did not report the incident until 14 April [correction: Xinhua first reported the incident on 13 April. FTC did not provide a URL for any Xinhua reports; instead provided a URL for a 14 April People’s Daily article which itself gave CCTV.com as the source].
According to FTC, the blast occurred in a building in the same compound as the local town government building, close to the monastery, but that the building targeted was widely known to be disused and empty. The blast occurred at night; there were no witnesses to what had happened in the government compound.
Initially, five monks were arrested following the bomb blast although it is unclear which five of the monks named above [note: FTC provided pinyin for five of the ten monks’ names listed above; it is possible that these spellings came from a Chinese media source that FTC has not cited, and that these five monks are those arrested initially].
FTC’s source “speculates” that the bomb blast “had been staged by the authorities to justify arrests of monks at Thangkya who had resisted patriotic re-education”.
The second group of five monks and the layman were reportedly arrested “soon after” following a “large protest at the monastery demanding the release of five arrested monks” [note: one of the ten monks, Tsering Wangdue, was reportedly released; when Chinese media first reported the alleged bombing it claimed that nine monks had been arrested].
(reported by FTC, 14 October 2008)

  Monday, 22 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gyanbe township, Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Eight monks convicted of bombing a government building in Gyanbe township during March have been sentenced to prison; trial held at the People’s Court in Chamdo [see Chamdo, AP, 14/10/08].
(reported by AP, 14 October 2008)

  Tuesday, 16 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Lhorong (Chin: Luolong) county

A ‘patriotic re-education campaign’ titled “Safe Monastery, Harmonious Monastery” was launched in Lhorong county with the central theme of teaching monks and nuns to love the ‘motherland’. A work team was established to implement the campaign in each town and township in the county.
[Tibet Watch cited www.cdxs.gov.cn. See also Zituo monastery, 16 September 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/10/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Zituo monastery Lhorong (Chin: Luolong) county

Zituo monastery was selected as the trial monastery for a Lhorong county ‘patriotic re-education campaign’ titled “Safe Monastery, Harmonious Monastery”.
On 16 September a meeting was held and attended by the leaders of Lhorong County Committee, nuns and monks from Zituo monastery and [local] residents.
[Tibet Watch cited www.cdxs.gov.cn. See also Lhorong county, 16 September 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/10/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Driru county (Chin: Biru Xian)

The “Safe Driru County” work team inspected each town/township’s offices
“directly under the direction” of the “central county government”. The work team propagated several laws such as the “Anti-separation Law”.
[Tibet Watch cited www.xznqnews.com.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Thursday, 11 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Khangmar (Chin: Kangma) county

‘Patriotic education’ classes (“Anti-splittism, defending Stability and
Promote Development”
) held for locals by retired Khangmar county cadres who also performed a cultural performance, which “exposed the miserable life under the rule of serfdom system in old society by narrating their own experiences” according to a government news report.
[Tibet Watch cited www.chinatibetnews.com/xizang/shizheng.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Tuesday, 09 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Woeser monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Hu Jiming, Vice Secretary of “Chamdo prefecture government committee”, inspected the ongoing patriotic education campaign at Woeser (Chin: Weise) monastery; praised the results achieved by the work team stationed in the monastery; called for the “continuation of patriotic education and law propagation to ensure the ’stability of the monastery” [unresolved open single quotation mark before “stability” – possibly the beginning of a quote of Hu Jiming – appears in Tibet Watch’s quotation of the original text].
[Tibet Watch cited www.cdxs.gov.cn.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Thursday, 04 September 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

“Patriotic education campaigns” are launched in each primary and secondary school in Lhasa, to educate children about the events of 14 March protests in Lhasa.
[Tibet Watch cited http://info.tibet.cn/zt2008/lswmcs/cjdt/200809/t20080904_424361htm.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Thursday, 21 August 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

In an article published by the French newspaper Le Monde (21/08/08), the Dalai Lama is reported to have said that 140 people were killed [on 18 August] in eastern Tibet [Kardze]. The Office of HHDL, France, responded: “We would like to clarify that His Holiness did not mention any number of casualties. In response to a question from the journalist about recent news stating that Chinese troops had fired on a demonstration, His Holiness clearly stated that we had no specific information on the number of casualties. In this particular interview His Holiness said: ‘We just heard that, but no possibility to cross-check. So I don’t know.’ Since receiving this news, efforts have been made without success to communicate with the local affected population in Kardze”.
(reported by Office of HHDL, France, 21 August 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Lhasa remains under lockdown, patrolled by police and paramilitary forces. At least four teams of paramilitary police are on guard around the clock on the pilgrim route that circles the Jokhang temple; each team comprises five men carrying automatic rifles who patrol a section of the route. Some of the teams, dressed in camouflage, have recently been replaced by patrols carrying what appear to be teargas launchers in tubes on their backs. Paramilitary officers stand at bus stops; police board buses to check for anyone suspicious. Armed police in camouflage, some helmeted, others carrying riot shields and electric batons, are deployed at road junctions. They stand in groups, facing out to scan the street. At night, lorries filled with paramilitaries drive through the streets of Tibetan areas of the city, at barely more than a walking pace.
(reported by The Times, 26 August 2008)

Woeser, Tibetan writer and blogger, questioned by several police officers for eight hours; acting on a tip-off from a member of the public who had seen her taking photographs of army and police positions in Lhasa from inside a taxi.
Eight police arrived at her mother’s home and presented her with a summons to accompany them for questioning. Her husband, the author Wang Lixiong, said: “They had used the wrong name on the document so I insisted that they correct the name before they could take her away. I reminded them that they had to bring her home within the stipulated 12 hours”. Woeser told the police it is “not illegal to take photographs in a public place” and she “had not visited any secret areas or military installations”.
Police searched her mother’s home; removed several documents and Wang Lixiong’s computer; hacked his password, checked all files on the laptop and required Woeser to erase every photograph that showed a policeman or army officer on the streets of Lhasa or in Tibetan areas they had visited.
The couple organised a reunion party with Woeser’s family and friends but then did not attend; they flew back to Beijing on 23 August, less than 48 hours after her summons and six days into a planned month-long visit to Lhasa.
(reported by The Times, 26 August 2008)

  Monday, 18 August 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

The Dalai Lama told the French newspaper Le Monde that the PLA opened fire during a protest in eastern Tibet: “I gather that 140 Tibetans were killed, although the figure needs to be confirmed”.
Chhime Chhoekyapa, an aide to the Dalai Lama in India, played down his comments: “We know about disturbances in the Kham region. But we do not have any details or figures about injuries or deaths…Nor do we have any exact dates for the disturbances”.
[Note: Reuters published two versions of the “140 Tibetans killed” report on 21/08/08. The first version did not include the comments from Chhime Chhoekyapa. On 22/08/08, Reuters published a third version, omitting “I gather that 140 Tibetans were killed” after Le Monde retracted the quotation.]
(reported by Reuters, 21 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

The French newspaper Le Monde reported that, in an interview, the Dalai Lama said Chinese soldiers opened fire on Tibetans on 18 August; although the death toll needed to be confirmed, he had heard 140 people were killed.
The Dalai Lama’s office subsequently denied he mentioned any specific death toll from the alleged mass killing; according to a statement, “His Holiness clearly stated we had no specific information on the number of casualties”.
(reported by ABC News, 22 August 2008)

In an interview published by Le Monde (21/08/08), the Dalai Lama was reported to have said that 140 people were reportedly killed by Chinese security forces in Kardze (Chin: Ganzi). The Dalai Lama’s office has stated that he “did not mention any number of casualties” on alleged 18 August Tibet shooting. The statement added: “In response to a question from the journalist about recent news stating that Chinese troops had fired on a demonstration, His Holiness clearly stated that we had no specific information on the number of casualties”.
[Note: this explanation does not clarify the matter; Le Monde (21/08/08) published the first article regarding the alleged shooting incident; therefore the journalist could only have asked about ‘140 deaths’ if the Dalai Lama had indeed stated this or if the journalist had heard a rumour about the incident.]
In an interview with AsiaNews, Prof. Samdhong Rinpoche, the Prime Minister of Tibet’s Government-in-Exile, also confirmed there was no such massacre by the Chinese army in Tibet in recent days. He attributed the controversy as having stemmed from a “wrong translation” during the Le Monde interview.
(reported by Phayul, 22 August 2008)

The Dalai Lama told Le Monde: “The Chinese army again fired on a crowd on Monday August 18, in the Kham region in eastern Tibet…One hundred and forty Tibetans are reported to have been killed, but the figure needs to be confirmed”.
The Dalai Lama’s representative in Geneva, Tseten Samdup Chhoekyapa, said [in response to the Le Monde report] that the incident occurred in Garze [Tib: Kardze]; information had come from a “reliable” source; however, due to the absolute information blackout, the incident could not be confirmed (the Dalai Lama’s office usually releases information only after receiving confirmation from a second source). Tibetan activist groups were unaware of the reported clash; they said information sources had dried up because of the security crackdown.
(reported by AFP, 21 August 2008)

[Note: The following is the third version of a report published by Reuters, based on a Le Monde article. Reuters first two versions, published on 21/08/08, included the a supposed quote of the Dalai Lama saying, “I gather that 140 Tibetans were killed [on Monday], although the figure needs to be confirmed”. On 22/08/08, Reuters published a third version of the report; a note at the beginning stated, “Corrects Aug 21 story after Le Monde retracted quotation, removing erroneous quote from third paragraph”. However, the amended third paragraph did not clarify the matter.]
Reuters’ second paragraph: “The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader told the French newspaper Le Monde that the army opened fire during a protest in the eastern Tibetan region of Kham on Monday”.
Reuters’ third paragraph: “Asked about a figure of 140 deaths mentioned in the incident [sic] reported in eastern Tibet, the Dalai Lama replied that the figure was an estimate that needed to be confirmed”.
Reuters article went on to state that the Dalai Lama’s office issued a statement saying his exact words during the interview were: “We just heard that, but no possibility to cross-check. So I don’t know”.
Chhime Chhoekyapa, an aide to the Dalai Lama in India, played down the comments: “We know about disturbances in the Kham region. But we do not have any details or figures about injuries or deaths…Nor do we have any exact dates for the disturbances”.
(reported by Reuters, 22 August 2008)

  Wednesday, 13 August 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Sangkhog, Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

On 13 August, a horse race in Sangkhog township was called off by Sangchu county government just a day before it was scheduled to take place. On average more than 10,000 Tibetans gather [annually] at Panchen Thang horse race ground, named after the Panchen Lama. No reasons given for the cancellation.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

Date unspecified: Monks at Drepung monastery have been cut off from contact with the outside world; no phone calls made to the monastery are answered and it is suspected that the monks’ cellphones have been confiscated.
(reported by RFA, 13 August 2008)

  Monday, 11 August 2008
  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Kumbum Jampaling monastery

Date unspecified: Monks “near the Kumbum monastery in Xining” said they would be unable to go to the Olympics as spectators because the railway station had refused to sell them tickets. They told AFP, “E-mail services to the monastery have been discontinued until after the Olympics” [RFA’s words; quotation of RFA paraphrasing AFP. It is not clear whether or not the monks are able to use internet cafés in the town].
[Notes: Kumbum monastery is not located in Xining, but approximately 16 miles away. RFA refers to AFP as an original source, although AFP’s wording had been more accurate: “Kumbum Monastery […] on a hillside near […] Xining”; furthermore, in AFP’s report it appears that the monks are resident at Kumbum, not merely located “near” Kumbum at the time of speaking to journalists. This information has been entered on the database according to AFP’s date of publication as no other date was provided; however, RFA’s version included an AFP photograph taken at Kumbum monastery on 5 August 2008.]
(reported by RFA, 13 August 2008)

Date unspecified: Restrictions and security measures aimed at limiting the monks’ movements and communication during the Olympic Games period, to prevent “a repeat of the violence and anti-Chinese protests” that occurred in Tibetan areas in March 2008. According to one monk, they would not be able to go to see the Olympics because the train station [in Xining] will not sell them any train tickets. Apparently the monks “can’t get email until October after the Olympics” [it is not clear whether or not they are able to use internet cafes in the town. The monks are being watched constantly by the authorities and were pressured not to talk to foreigners; they are regularly asked where they have been and who they have talked to. [At least] five monks had been detained during the period of unrest, but they have since returned to the monastery.
[Note: this information has been entered on the database according to AFP’s date of publication as no other date was provided; however, on 13/08/08, RFA reproduced an AFP photograph taken at Kumbum monastery on 5 August 2008.]
(reported by AFP, 11 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Charuwa village, Cha township, Ngaba (Ch: Aba) county

County PSB personnel arrested Jampel and Lama, an elder and a younger son from Tarring family, and Jigme from Gaenyug family, suspected of having participated in protests during March 2008.
[Note: this came from CTA’s second Update on Tibet Demonstrations dated 7 August 2008, but was actually published on 23 August 2008.]
(reported by CTA, 23 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

At around 9 pm, Jamphel (28) and Lama (22), two brothers from the Terrangtsang family in Jaru town, were arrested by Ngaba county PSB on suspicion of taking part in demonstrations in Ngaba county in March.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Sunday, 10 August 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

At around 8am, PAP severely beat and then arrested Dolma Yangzom (aged approximately 34), a nun from Tapon family in Lhopa village, Kardze county, for shouting slogans outside the county government office, including “His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be invited to Tibet” and “Political prisoners including the Panchen Lama must be released immediately”.
[Note: this came from CTA’s second Update on Tibet Demonstrations dated 7 August 2008, but was actually published on 23 August 2008.]
(reported by CTA, 23 August 2008)

  Saturday, 09 August 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba (Chin: Aba), Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

The two women shot in Ngaba on 9 August were both Tibetan:

  1. Sonam Wangmo, 22, from Tseni township in Lower Ngaba county; a waitress in a teashop; she was shot in the arm.
  2. Zhang Yeying, 28, from Gyarong (Ch: Jiarong) in Kardze TAP; she was shot in the hand.

Four or five gunshots were heard. Tibetans who went to the assistance of the women reported that Chinese soldiers arrived on the scene shortly after the shots were fired, claiming that the firing had had been “a mistake”. The women were taken to the Ngaba County Civil Hospital; their present medical condition is unknown.
[Note: FTC updated its online press release dated 10/08/08 during the following days; no date was provided for the amendments, thus the amended version incorrectly appears to have been published on 10/08/08. The text here is a summary of the additional information provided regarding the 09/08/08 shooting incident, taken from the version of the press release that was available online on 13/08/08. See separate database entry for FTC 09/08/08 for a summary of the shooting incident, as reported on 10/08/08.]
(reported by FTC, 13 August 2008)

Two women visiting a mobile telephone shop on Ngawa [Ngaba] town’s main road to recharge their phone at 4.30pm were shot at from a building known to be occupied by Chinese soldiers who recently arrived in Ngawa.
One of the women, a Tibetan named Sonam Wangmo, was seen lying in the street with a bullet wound in one leg; the other woman, whose nationality could not be confirmed, was seen lying in the street beside the mobile telephone shop with a bullet wound to her hand. They were taken to a hospital by the authorities; no information is known regarding their wellbeing or current location. The situation was described as very tense. The shooting occurred two-and-a-half hours before a daily 7pm curfew was due to come into force.
[Note: FTC later updated the online press release of 10/08/08 although no date was provided for the amendments. The text here was summarised from the press release as it appeared on 10/08/08.]
(reported by FTC, 10 August 2008)

At around 4.30pm, Sonam Wangmo (22, from Lower Ngaba Sezo) and Zgang Yeying (28, from Gyarong (Chin: Jiaronong)) went to “the local mobile phone shop” [in Ngaba town] to recharge their phones. At the end of “the main road of Ngaba town” they were “shot with bullets”; four of five rounds were fired from a nearby building where military personnel were stationed; Sonam Wangmo was hit in the leg; Zgang Yeying was hit “on her hand”. Reportedly, “a military personnel” [sic] told the crowds who gathered after the incident that the shooting was an accident.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Friday, 08 August 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Bora monastery, Bora township, Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

Chinese authorities prohibited the performance of an annual ritual ‘deer dance’ scheduled for 8 August [the date on which the event was declared prohibited was not stated]. The monastery is surrounded by police; the monks are watched 24-hours a day and warned of serious consequences if they leave the monastery.
(reported by RFA, 13 August 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Tsoe (Kanlho Dzong; Chin: Gannan/Hezuo/Hezuoshen), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Tight security was enforced in “Tsoe city” from the beginning of the Olympic Games; around 20-30 armed police patrolled the streets; barricades of sacks filled with cement assembled at the “entrance and exits points of the three main streets of the town”; several surveillance cameras and “rubber speed breakers” at each checkpoint. The majority of the paramilitary personnel brought into the city [earlier, since mid March 2008] “were still present”. Tsoe residents required to obtain a travel permit from the police station leave the town. Officials from the local government “frequently conduct patriotic re-education campaigns” at Tsoe monastery.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Date unspecified; during the course of the Beijing Olympic Games, which commenced on 8 August: Chinese officials told monks at Longwu monastery that they are not allowed to leave.
Khaso Rinpoche, a senior lama who was injured during clashes with armed police in March, is recovering in a hospital in Xining city; he is able to walk with a crutch but had not returned to the monastery since the unrest.
(reported by RFA, 13 August 2008)

  Thursday, 07 August 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Four foreigners visiting Labrang monastery were banned from staying overnight in Labrang town; told by police guarding a checkpoint: “You came to see Olympic Game, but why do you want to go to Tibetan areas. You are not allowed to visit Tibetan areas. Please go to see the Games in Beijing”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Monday, 04 August 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Doltsig, Ngaba (Chin: Aba) county

Chinese military forces stationed in Doltsig township; reportedly, “the number of those forces lies in the thousands”; stationed on grassland, which serves as a pasture to nomads from two of the nearby villages. The military carried out a large scale drilling exercise attended by local government officials.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Friday, 01 August 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Beijing

Date unspecified: “Reports from Beijing indicate that as many as 300 Tibetans in Beijing’s Sunday Market have been told to sell their homes and leave Beijing in the lead up to [the] Olympics, implying that they’re being kicked out for good”.
(reported by SFT, 05 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

Account of Wen-Yan King, a Taiwanese-American travelling on her Taiwanese passport, therefore without needing a Chinese tourist visa; arrested in Kardze on 31 July 2008: In Kangding on 1 August, Wen-Yan King was interviewed by police in a hotel room for two hours; then searched her possessions again; they found her external hard-drive, which she had “accidentally packed”, and which contained photographs [showing her involvement in the Tibetan freedom movement].
Four and a half hours later she was put in a car with four new people and taken to Chengdu; police said she was free to go, but was asked to write a letter explaining why she came to China, where she went and what she did wrong; she was taken to dinner; passports and cellphone were returned; she was told to collect her hard-drive the following morning after they had deleted it [note: Wen-Yan King later posted some of her photographs online, including the military base, see: www.flickr.com/photos/medapt/3058339143/. It would seem that data was deleted from her external hard drive but not from her camera memory card.]
(reported by The Huffington Post, 12 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Lithang (Chin: Litang), Lithang (Chin: Litang Xian) county

Lindsey Hilsum, Channel 4 News China correspondent writing for New Statesman; date unknown, circa 1 August 2008: The annual summer horse festivals [in Lithang and throughout the region] have been banned to prevent potential protest (in 2007, a Tibetan called Ronggyal Adrak protested at the Lithang horse festival). Only small, local festivals are allowed [in 2008].
(reported by New Statesman, 07 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba (Chin: Aba), Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

A 7pm curfew has been in effect since 1 August and is maintained by a five-fold increase in the number of Chinese soldiers based in Ngaba town; not known whether they are PLA or PAP.
Date unspecified: Troops were seen performing military drills, “trampling the crops and grass” on “grassland used as pasture for Tibetan nomads from the nearby villages” of Jadhe and Chushu. “Most of the guests from the local Ngaba county government were invited to observe the exercise”.
[Note: FTC updated its online press release dated 10/08/08 during the following days; no date was provided for the amendments, thus the amended version incorrectly appears to have been published on 10/08/08. The text here is a summary of the additional information provided regarding troop deployment in Ngaba in early August, taken from the version of the press release that was available online on 13/08/08. See separate database entry for FTC 09/08/08 for a summary of the troop deployment in Ngaba, as reported on 10/08/08.]
(reported by FTC, 13 August 2008)

Ngawa [Ngaba] town filled with around 10,000 Chinese soldiers since the beginning of August. Checkpoints manned by soldiers set up on each road in the town; Tibetans registered in other towns not permitted to visit Ngawa. The authorities imposed a [daily] 7pm curfew in Ngawa town.
[Note: FTC later updated the online press release of 10/08/08 although no date was provided for the amendments. The text here was summarised from the press release as it appeared on 10/08/08.]
(reported by FTC, 10 August 2008)

Date unspecified: The “presence of military troops were increased” in Ngaba town and its surroundings; in early August approximately 1,000 armed military personnel stationed in Ngaba town; several check-points built “at the beginning and end” of all the town’s six main streets.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Restrictions on movements after 7pm were applied to both monks and laypeople as of 1 August [it is not clear whether throughout the county, or specifically in Ngaba town]; the restrictions continued until the end of the Olympics.
Dozens of Tibetans in exile reported that it was not possible to phone relatives in Ngaba county [during the Olympic Games]; a computerised message in Chinese stated: “This number is not in service”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Thursday, 31 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Account of Wen-Yan King, a Taiwanese-American travelling on her Taiwanese passport, therefore without needing a Chinese tourist visa: Wen-Yan King decided to return to Chengdu; bought a bus ticket bound to leave the next day. Walked up to the local monastery; took photographs including a few of a military base; a plain-clothed Chinese man held up his cell phone unusually high in her direction. Soon, the police officer who had threatened her the night before, stopped her; said to follow him to the police station, where two plain-clothed police filmed her with hand-held camcorders, getting close to her face. They drove her to her hotel, confiscated her phone and her American and Taiwanese passports. Ten plain-clothed PSB officers searched Wen-Yan King’s room; checked photographs on her camera; found the shots of the military camp; they started whispering to each other; flipped through her journal and filmed every sheet of paper that she was carrying, front and back. They said they would return her bus ticket and take her to Kangding for further investigation. Prevented from calling the US embassy: told “You are a Chinese citizen travelling in China on your Chinese documents. You’ll be prosecuted according to Chinese law” (she had thought she would be protected as an American citizen; however, the Chinese government does not recognise dual citizenship and she had entered China on her Taiwanese passport). They told her if she had a clean background then probably nothing would happen; but she was formally arrested and charged with the crime of “illegally possessing state secrets”.
Taken to a Chinese restaurant and put at a table with mostly Tibetan public security police officers; told to eat; then began 12-hour drive to Kangding.
(reported by The Huffington Post, 12 August 2008)

  Wednesday, 30 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Account of Wen-Yan King, a Taiwanese-American travelling on her Taiwanese passport, therefore without needing a Chinese tourist visa: Wen-Yan King’s driver took back roads to avoid the numerous checkpoints; arrived in Kardze town, which “looks like a war zone”; the police “are in the middle of the sidewalks”, wearing helmets, holding guns and riot shields in rows of 10 or 15. Police are “outside convenience stores under blue tarps every half a block, on both sides of the road” and “up on raised metal posts with cutout windows”. Having lunch in a café, “I would casually ask a Chinese person, ‘When you see all these police, are you scared?’ And they would all say, ‘No. They’re here to protect us. Why should we be scared?’”
Checked e-mails at an internet café – a message in broken English from Google Notifications stated: “These days,we are detect unusual account,so some unexpected problems may happen.Depending on the behaviour detected by our system, we may temporarily disabled your access to the account.Thanks,The Gmail Team”.
(Wen-Yan King later learnt that Tibetan friends in India received an email from her account which she had not sent, dated 31 July 2008 – subject: “We got some foreigners in the mainland of PRC that was interested in the plan of RTFC; message: “the list contains details of 6 foreigners and 2 chinese”.)
Wen-Yan King’s e-mail account “implicated” people she had been e-mailing, including people who had planned to return to Tibet [and yet she attempted to access the account while in the PRC].
At 11:40pm on 30 July, the police raided Wen-Yan King ‘s hotel; they looked around her room and warned her: "If you do anything suspicious, there’ll be consequences".
(reported by The Huffington Post, 12 August 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

China has announced a sweeping security operation in Lhasa to prevent unrest in Lhasa during the Olympic Games; the TAR authorities have ordered the cancellation of all holidays for police and all other security personnel until after 24 August.
(reported by The Times, 30 July 2008)

  Tuesday, 29 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Lithang county (Chin: Litang Xian)

Account of Wen-Yan King, a Taiwanese-American travelling on her Taiwanese passport, therefore without needing a Chinese tourist visa. Date unspecified, circa 29 July 2008 (Wen-Yan King arrived in Kardze town on 30 July after visiting Lithang):
In Lithang, Wen-Yan King counted up to seven police stations in a half-mile radius [unclear if Lithang town or county]; reportedly these had sprung up after protests in March. Tibetans said that five people had recently disappeared and no one knew what happened to them.
[Note: although the 2008 Lithang horse festival had officially been cancelled, Wen-Yan King’s photographs of a notably small event are available online under the title of “Lithang Horse Festival” www.flickr.com/photos/medapt/sets/72157610086514552/.]
(reported by The Huffington Post, 12 August 2008)

  Saturday, 26 July 2008
  Qinghai Province » Jyekundo TAP (Chin: Yushu) » Drokshog township, Nangchen county (Chin: Nangqian xian)

A planned five-day summer festival in celebration of the Beijing Olympic Games was officially announced around two months ago. County authorities ordered township and village authorities to organise a spectacle or performance for the planned summer festival which, with compulsory participation from each family, was to include a “song and dance, and custom competition among villages at Drokshog township”. A rehearsal was scheduled for 25 July; song lyrics prepared by each village were thoroughly scrutinised by the authorities to ensure that none referred to the Dalai Lama or Karmapa. The people showed “great displeasure over [the] stern enforcement by the Chinese authorities”.
On 26 July, three days before the festival was due to commence, four Tibetans shouted slogans “in the presence of a large number of local government officials and people at the site of the planned summer festival”. They said, “This is not the year to celebrate as Tibetans have suffered untold repression under the Chinese regime; rather, it is time to mourn and offer prayers” for those who have died or been imprisoned during recent unrest; “we want freedom” and “the Dalai Lama should return to Tibet”. They distributed pamphlets and requested Tibetans to return to their villages; those preparing for the festival packed up their tents and left, leaving only the government tents at the festival ground.
The protesters – Asang Bersatsang (aged 21), Ngoesoe Konkyaptsang (aged 35), Jamsang (age unknown) and Gadho (age unknown) – were arrested that evening by Nangchen county PSB officials. Two days later, township residents wrote an appeal letter to the county authorities calling for the immediate release of the four detained Tibetans. The festival did not go ahead.
(reported by TCHRD, 30 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Jyekundo TAP (Chin: Yushu) » Nagchen county

One person from each household in Drogshog township, Nangchen county, had previously been forced by the relevant county authorities to “join in practising the Tibetan songs and dances in groups for around two months after which the best performing groups would be selected through competition”. Residents believed that the selected groups would either perform during the summer festival to express happiness about the Beijing Olympics, or that they would be taken to Beijing to perform during the Olympics.
On 24 July, the performers gathered for a selection which occurred on 25 July; county officials found that most of the lyrics were in praise of the Dalai Lama and the Karmapa; the lyrics were “disapproved”; the performers then “strongly expressed their opposition”.
On 26 July, a group of Tibetans from Drogshog township, led by Asang from Bhertsa Tsang family, Ngoe Soe from Konkyab Tsang family, Jamsang, and Gado Nyima, staged a peaceful protest at the county government office “and the public place” while distributing leaflets; shouted slogans: “This year is not for us to celebrate but to offer our condolences and show solidarity at this time of inhumane treatment to the Tibetans. We must be given freedom. His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be invited to Tibet. People must not gather here, but return to your homes”. The four protest leaders were arrested that night by county PSB. On 28 July, Drogshog township residents submitted an “application” calling for their release or else they would “carry out strong protests until no one is left in the township”. No further information available.
(reported by CTA, 07 August 2008)

  Friday, 18 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzokchen monastery, Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county

A “huge number of Chinese forces” have [been present] at Dzokchen monastery since March [CTA does not state whether PLA, PAP or PSB].
On Friday 18 July, while “dressed in Tibetan attires” [some of the Chinese personnel] hunted animals in Ri-Dham-Loong, a place considered holy by local Tibetans. When a Tibetan lama on retreat told them that hunting is not allowed, the Chinese forces beat him. Upon hearing of this incident at around 3pm, Dzokchen monastery’s monks went to complain at the township. Their complaint was rejected, resulting in a fight between the monks and the “Chinese forces”. It is reported that some monks were shot during the fight. Some senior lamas mediated and the situation was temporarily calmed down.
(reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)

  Thursday, 17 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Yonten Tso, a 19-year-old nun from Dhargye Yetsag Nang village in Kardze county, staged a peaceful protest at the county government office. She was severely beaten and arrested by the PAP.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

  Tuesday, 15 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Gochok, Serthar (Chin: Seda) county

Lhagyal, from Gochok village, was arrested on 15 July for involvement in protests during March.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Kunsang Tsering, a 22-year-old monk from Dhargye Langna monastery in Kardze county undertook a peaceful protest in front of the county PSB office. He was shot during his arrest by the PAP. It has not been confirmed whether he is alive or dead.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

Dhungkar from Choegyam Tsang family in Tseshul village was arrested by county authorities, suspected of having participated in protests during March 2008.
(reported by CTA, 07 August 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: “In July, around 10 monks from an unidentified monastery located in Karze [Kardze] county were transferred [CTA doesn’t state from where] to Sangyib Prison” in Lhasa. Directly contradicting itself, CTA added: “According to some sources, they are likely from Kathok monastery in Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county” [both Kardze and Palyul counties are located in Kardze TAP]. Information regarding the monks’ arrest is not available; names of three of the monks are:

  1. Tenzin Soepa.
  2. Nyima Tashi.
  3. Gelek.
    (reported by CTA, 16 July 2008)
  Monday, 14 July 2008
  Qinghai Province » Tsonub M&TAP (Chin: Haixi) » Golmud (Chin: Ge'ermu)

Lobsang, a monk from Dzongkar monastery in Rebgong [Rebkong] county, Malho TAP, Qinghai Province, was arrested in Lhasa in March; he was studying at Drepung monastery at the time of his arrest. Currently, he is being held in a prison in Gormo [Golmud, a.k.a. Nagormo; Chin: Ge’ermu; in Qinghai Province], where he was severely beaten.
(reported by CTA, 14 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

A new official regulation was announced to maintain stability and to oppose ‘splittist’ forces; the regulation was jointly issued by TAR Communist Party’s Discipline Inspection Commission (Ch: Jie Wei) and TAR Government Discipline Committee (Ch: Jian cha ting); targets current and retired Tibetan Communist Party members and government employees whose children are studying in the exiled educational institutions run by the “Dalai Clique”. The act of sending children to India goes against Party rules and government policies; a two-month ultimatum was issued to recall children currently studying in India; Tibetan party members and government employees will face dire consequences (expulsion from the Party and loss of government jobs) if they fail to recall their children; they should voluntarily surrender and explain before the government department or the Party for leniency without penalty.
[Note: TCHRD cited chinatibetnews.com (14/07/08) as the source; an English language version of the original was not available at the time of posting the report on this database; therefore, a summary of TCHRD’s version has been provided. China Daily did not report this until 24/07/08 – a summary is available on this database.]
(reported by TCHRD, 15 July 2008)

Under a regulation drawn up by the regional Party and government disciplinary inspection commissions, all current and retired Party members and government employees working in the TAR were given an ultimatum to call back their children from overseas schools and monasteries run by the “Dalai clique” within two months; those who fail to do so will be expelled from the Party and removed from their posts.
(reported by China Daily, 24 July 2008)

  Sunday, 13 July 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

More than 1,000 Buddhist monks are still locked up under armed guard in monasteries around Lhasa. On every street corner in the city centre, a soldier stands watch. Most temples and monasteries are under 24-hour surveillance.
(reported by The Sunday Times, 13 July 2008)

PLA troops have sealed off Drepung monastery with a camp of tents and two rings of roadblocks; nobody may go in or out, photography is banned and passers-by are shooed away. Local people say the monks pay the army for food to be sent to them. Drepung’s monks were singled out for ‘re-education’ because Chinese security forces identified many of its monks on video recordings of protests.
(reported by The Sunday Times, 13 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Nechung Nangten Lobling monastery, Lhasa

Nechung monastery has been sealed off by PLA troops.
(reported by The Sunday Times, 13 July 2008)

  Saturday, 12 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Gonchen monastery, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Monks at Gonchen monastery attempted to mark a festival that pays homage to the birthday of Padmasambhava (Guru Rimpoche), on the tenth day of the sixth month of the Tibetan calendar. Officials who had been assigned to the monastery to “keep an eye on the monks” since a “deadly riot in Lhasa on March 12” [sic], refused to allow the monks to hold their traditional dances. Three Tibetan sources, speaking on condition of anonymity, told The Times that officers from the PAP were deployed to halt any violence, but monks clashed with the paramilitary police and shots were fired and two monks were killed [The Times wrote that all three sources stated that two monks had been shot dead]. One of the sources told The Times: “Two monks were killed. These were my relatives.”
Repeated calls by The Times to Dege [Derge] “resulted in professions of ignorance of any incident on that date”. A worker at a local hotel said: “The incident on July 12 was just an accident. Everything is safe here.” Another said: “The monasteries are open to visitors.” A government official put down the telephone when asked about the incident. Chinese officials installed in the monastery have refused to answer questions.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by The Times, 18 July 2008)

At least two monks of Gonchen monastery reportedly killed when Chinese police opened fired on a crowd of monks during a scuffle over an annual ritual Cham dance festival, which the authorities forcibly stopped.
An unconfirmed report also “suggested” that a blast in the monastery left an unknown numbers of monks dead and some injured; “Sources have further informed that the blast was a powerful one”.
It could not be confirmed whether the two incidents “occurred simultaneously or by which incidents the two monks were killed”.
They are:

  1. Delok, aged approximately forty years.
  2. Gyaltsen, in his twenties.

A monk named Passang and three others are said to be in a critical condition.
Chinese authorities have imposed severe restrictions, prohibiting “the assembly of more than two persons”.

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by TSC, 21 July 2008)

Date unspecified: Chinese authorities lately described a blast at Gonchen monastery “on around” 12 July that killed two monks and injured four others.
Following this incident, the local authorities heightened the restrictions including prohibiting the gathering of more than two people around Gonchen monastery; all communication channels kept under strict surveillance, making it very difficult to get clear accounts of the 12 July incident.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)

A wooden temple used to store cultural relics at Gonchen monastery collapsed following an explosion at 12:30pm. Six monks were eating in the building at the time of the explosion; two were killed and four were injured. The deceased were buried on 16 July.
Xinhua paraphrased Zhao Ying, vice director of the provincial information office, and Wang Jian, the prefecture public security bureau vice director, who were speaking at a news conference in Chengdu on 22 July. Xinhua reported that investigations had been carried out. A “short circuit in a worn-out electrical wire produced sparks, which ignited black powder that was stored there”. The temple had broken safety rules in storing 716 kg of “black powder” used “periodically in Buddhist rituals”. The “temple administration committee agreed with the probe’s conclusion”; “the temple transferred its remaining black powder and 29 guns used for Buddhist rituals to the county explosive warehouse and public security authorities”.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 22 July 2008)

Xinhua wrote that a report carried by London-based The Times on 18 July saying two monks in a temple in Garze [Kardze TAP] were shot dead by armed police was fabricated, according to “an anonymous Chinese official”. The comment was made by “an unnamed authority with the information office of the Sichuan Provincial Government”. Xinhua reported that “Investigations showed there has been no clash between monks and the armed police on July 12”. Paraphrasing the unnamed official, Xinhua wrote, “Two monks at Gonchen monastery … did die that day in a house blast in the monastery, but [were not] killed by armed police after they were in dispute with the officials, as the British newspaper reported”.
The unnamed official reportedly stated that a house in the northern part of Gonchen monastery exploded at midday when six monks were having lunch on the first floor. Three monks escaped, but the others were buried; two later died of severe injuries. The identities of the dead are “not immediately known”, but the two monks were allegedly buried on 16 July.
Xinhua wrote: “The collapse was caused by an explosion of black powder kept in the house. [An] explosion was caused as a short circuit in a worn-out electrical wire produced sparks, which ignited black powder stored there. It was also disclosed that the temple had broken safety rules in storing 716 kg of black powder. This was used periodically in Buddhist rituals … Following the blast, the temple transferred its remaining black powder and 29 guns used for Buddhist rituals to the county explosive warehouse and the public security authorities”.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23 July 2008)

According to a TibetInfoNet source, the incident at Gonchen monastery was an accidental explosion, not a shooting. However, the presence of 716 kilograms of “black powder” stored at the monastery for religious rituals is questionable. Explosives, mainly needed for road construction, are frequently stored in private premises in Tibetan regions; however, in this case it remains unclear what the black powder was.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by TibetInfoNet, 01 August 2008)

The Times published a letter written by Liu Weimin, Press Counsellor of the Embassy of China to the UK, in response to The Times’ 18/07/08 article Chinese impose blackout over new Tibetan monk deaths. The letter stated that the allegations made by The Times had “no basis in fact” according to subsequent investigations:
“No incident involving a clash between monks and the armed police occurred in any of the temples and monasteries in Dege [Derge] on July 12. However, two monks in Gonchen Monastery were killed on that day, though not as a result of clashes with the armed police, but due to collapsing buildings. At noon on July 12, six monks were having lunch in a room used for storing cultural relics and sacrificial articles in the north of the monastery. When the room collapsed, three rushed out and the other three were buried inside. The local government immediately sent rescue teams to the site. However, two monks died from their wounds. Investigations show that the collapse was caused by the explosion of 50 kilograms of black powder illegally stored in the monastery, which in turn was triggered by short circuit”.
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • AFP, 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
    (reported by The Times, 04 August 2008)

According to China’s state media (Xinhua), a Tibetan Buddhist temple collapsed killing two monks when a powder used in religious rituals exploded. The accident allegedly occurred when an electrical short circuit ignited a black powder stored there. Four other monks were hurt in the explosion and collapse of Gonchen monastery.
AFP noted that Xinhua’s report, which quoted Wang Jian, vice director of the prefecture’s police force, did not identify the powder and did not say why the incident was not reported sooner [Note: the incident appears to have been reported in response to an article by The Times which stated that two monks had been shot dead by PAP at Gonchen monastery].
See also, Gonchen monastery, 12 July 2008:

  • The Times, 18/07/08
  • TSC, 21/07/08
  • Xinhua/China Daily, 22/07/08
  • Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 23/07/08
  • CTA, 26/07/08
  • TibetInfoNet, 01/08/08
  • The Times, 04/08/08
    (reported by AFP, 23 July 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Tokdhen monastery Ngaba (Chin: Aba) county

“An additional People’s Armed Police (PAP) [unit?] arrived at Tokdhen monastery … and intensified the restrictions”. The monastery has been “wired up” in order to install security cameras to monitor the monks’ movements. Those monks who have fled the monastery were ordered to return before 15 July. Whereabouts of Lama Kyab and Trinkho, who were arrested in March, are unknown.
(reported by CTA, 16 July 2008)

  Friday, 11 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyagchu county (Chin: Yajiang xian)

A contingent of more than 600 Chinese soldiers is stationed two miles from the monastery of Tenzin Delek Rinpoche in Nyakchuka [Nyagchu] county. Residents are banned from travelling to Lithang county, where there has been a significant build-up of military forces; the annual Lithang horseracing festival has been cancelled.
(reported by RFA, 11 July 2008)

  Thursday, 10 July 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Gaden Choekhor (Ganden Chungkor/Phenpo township), Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Two people from “nearby the Phenpo county” [presumably two people from Gaden Choekhor, Phenpo Lhundrup county town] who had been beaten are in very a critical condition.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Thirteen Lhasa city Communist Party members were expelled from the Party for their involvement in the “March 14 riot” [protests/riots] and their failure to uphold the three themes under the renewed ‘patriotic education’ campaign.
[Note: TCHRD cited China Tibet Information Centre (10/07/08) as the source; an English language version of the original was not available at the time of posting the report on this database; therefore, a summary of TCHRD’s report has been provided.]
(reported by TCHRD, 15 July 2008)

The PSB arrested a businessman named Thupten from his house; he was suspected of carrying out political activities. Born close to Dhargye monastery in Karze [Kardze] county, Thupten is aged around 40 years and is a Lhasa resident. His whereabouts is unknown.
(reported by CTA, 16 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lopa village, Phenpo Lhundrup (Chin: Lingzhi) county

It is reported that a person from the lower division of Lopa village who had been beaten is in a very critical condition.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tuesday, 08 July 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Chengdu, Sichuan Province

Plain-clothed PSB in Chengdu arrested three monks from Larung Ngarik Nangten Lobling monastic institution in Serthar county, Kardze TAP, Sichuan Province:

  1. Taphun, aged 44; had studied at the monastic institution for over twenty years and obtained its abbot’s degree.
  2. Ngakchung, aged 37; had served in various positions at the monastic institution.
  3. Gudrak; had served in various positions at the monastic institution.

The monks were visiting Chengdu “to purchase the requirements of their monastic institution”. The reason for their arrest is not known.
(reported by CTA, 14 July 2008)

  Monday, 07 July 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Chengdu, Sichuan Province

The second part of an account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days.
In a hotel lobby, approached by two men and a lady believed to be PSB (later they said they were from the Foreign Relations Department); called the writer’s name; wanted to speak to him; the writer suggested they talk there in the lobby but they pointed in a direction away from the hotel; the writer gave the Tibetan restaurant next door as an alternative to the lobby. Seated in the restaurant, the writer stated that he was “a Tibetan living in Australia and […] registered with Australian Government site informing of my travels and concerns should anything happen to me while in Tibet and China”. The Foreign Relations Department people said they had been contacted by the department branch in Barkham and that they were from the Chengdu Headquarters. The writer was asked about his personal history, marital status, job, if he had been to Lhasa, who was responsible for the 14 March troubles, his opinions of China, and foreign perceptions of China. Their contact details were provided in the form of a hotmail address of the interpreter.
(reported by Phayul, 08 August 2008)

  Sunday, 06 July 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Chengdu, Sichuan Province

The second part of an account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days.
On the morning of 6 July, Chengdu bus station officials refused to sell tickets to four Westerners who wanted to go to Dartsedo [the writer was not present in Chengdu that morning, but left Dartsedo for Chendgu after midday; presumably the tourists told the writer this information while in Chengdu].
Encountered five separate NGO volunteers in Dartsedo and Chengdu who were leaving Tibet under orders [from the authorities].
(reported by Phayul, 08 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

Account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days; refers to himself as “one of the only few Tibetans, if not the only one, who managed to get into Tibetan territory at that time”.
The Dalai Lama’s birthday; the main marketplace was quiet but there were Tibetans, “especially elderly ones”, offering juniper-incense at “the giant hearth of the local temples” [Sangtahb, at each temple], fervently turning prayer-wheels and audibly reciting the long-life prayer of the Dalai Lama.
(reported by Phayul, 23 July 2008)

The second part of an account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days.
Foreign guests at hotels in Dartsedo “number in single digit”; encountered five separate NGO volunteers in Dartsedo and Chengdu who were leaving Tibet under orders [from the authorities]. On 6 July (the Dalai Lama’s birthday), barely fifty meters from the half-constructed Holiday Inn, all incoming vehicles were being stopped and checked by police “with paratroopers [paramilitaries?] on standby”.
(reported by Phayul, 08 August 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Chinese authorities have “tightened security around Tibet’s main monasteries and banned visits to a sacred site” on the edge of Lhasa [The Times did not state which site] “for fear of a fresh outburst of unrest on the Dalai Lama’s birthday [6 July]”.
Few monks remain in “the province’s three most important monasteries” [the article focuses on Drepung, Sera and Ganden monasteries]; many have disappeared; more than 1,000 in total have been transferred to prisons and detention centres in and around Golmud in Qinghai province; “Their detention is part of a policy to rid the monasteries of any monks not registered as formal residents” of the TAR. Family members have been told that the monks will be incarcerated in Golmud until the end of the Beijing Olympic Games; a relative of one of the incarcerated monks stated: “After that they have been told that they will be allowed to leave, because they are not guilty of a crime […] But they will be ordered to return to their home villages and will not be permitted to go back to the monasteries in Lhasa”.
[Note: The Times reports incidents that have been occurring since March 2008, but does not provide additional information regarding supposed tightened security at the time of the Dalai Lama’s birthday.]
(reported by The Times, 07 July 2008)

  Saturday, 05 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

Account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days; refers to himself as “one of the only few Tibetans, if not the only one, who managed to get into Tibetan territory at that time”.
Outwardly things do not appear too restrictive in Dartsedo; a handful of Westerners could still be seen wandering the streets.
A poster was seen on the wall at the entrance of a hotel; written entirely in Tibetan, with the heading Zin-bZung bKa’-rgya" (Order for Arrest); black and white photocopied passport-style photographs of over thirty people; the poster had been defaced and torn apart [the same poster had been seen four days earlier at the entrance to a hotel in Tanpa].
During the afternoon of 5 July, police cars and motorbikes patrolled up and down the main street; at one stage there was a police motorcade – three motorbikes followed by four cars, and another three motorbikes at the rear. Fearing protests from the Tibetans on the following day – the Dalai Lama’s birthday – the Chinese officials were “making a show of their arms, to intimidate the Tibetans”. Tibetan monks and nuns walked about the streets “uncowed”.
(reported by Phayul, 23 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kangtsa, Serthar (Chin: Seda) county

Soelo (or Solo), from Kangtsa village, was arrested on 5 or 6 July [perhaps during the night of 5/6 July?] for involvement in protests during March.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kyil-ru, Serthar (Chin: Seda) county

Tendhar, from Kyil-ru village, was arrested on 5 July for involvement in protests during March.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Lithang county (Chin: Litang Xian)

Evening: the Chinese authorities deployed “several additional forces” in Lithang county – the day before the Dalai Lama’s birthday. Many of these forces have “dressed themselves in Tibetan costumes in order to cover up their presence in a large number”. Lithang county residents were ordered to remain in their homes for three days commencing 8pm on 5 July and were “threatened with their lives if they were found in the market or travelling to other areas”.
The people of surrounding counties – Nyagchu (Chin: Yajiang), Bathang (Chin: Batang), and Nyarong (Chin: Xinlong) – were restricted from travelling towards Lithang county for a few days.
Orders were also issued for the annual Lithang horse race summer festival [which is usually held in August] to be cancelled.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

Authorities began a build-up of military forces in the Lithang region, including around the town and its monasteries, and cancelled the annual horseracing festival (which was marked by protests in 2007).
The military presence is intimidating local Tibetans by conducting firing drills and other military exercises; the sound of explosions and firing of weapons frightened away birds, making it impossible to conduct traditional ‘sky burials’.
Many Chinese soldiers are “disguising the number of troops by putting on Tibetan dress”; they are deployed in different areas in Lithang [county]; residents have been warned that no-one is allowed to “move around or go to Lithang town and its monasteries” for three days; residents of neighbouring counties are also banned from Lithang; the local authorities warned that the Chinese security forces are authorised to shoot anyone who ignores the ban.
(reported by RFA, 11 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Barkham county (Chin: Maerkang Xian)

The second part of an account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days.
Turned away from “revisiting Barkham for the second time in a week”; “had travelled nineteen hours by bus from Chengdu” when he, as the only ‘foreigner’, was asked to get off the bus at a police checkpoint a few kilometres from Barkham.
Police told him “Maerkhang, no foreigner!”; passport was passed amongst the policemen; the senior-most policeman took the passport across the road and upstairs into an office “within the army barrack of which the soldiers were performing an exercise drill, with guns in hand”. The writer followed the policeman; the passport was photocopied and then returned; luggage was not touched. Told to return to Chengdu by bus on the next bus coming from Barkham; the writer persuaded them to let him return via a stopover in Dartsedo.
[Notes: the writer’s journey appears to have been: Chengdu-Barkham-Tanpa-Barkham-Dartsedo-Chengdu. Therefore, he was attempting to visit Barkham for a second time (not “revisiting” for a second time); his first reference to Barkham related to being there on 24 June 2008. On 5 July, it seems he travelled from Tanpa, not from Chengdu as stated as this contradicts all other details of his journey (unless he returned to Chengdu and then returned to Tibetan areas, which is very unlikely over the course of around 18 days). He had apparently arrived via Chengdu airport circa 19 June and departed via Chengdu airport 20 days later on 9 July. It is assumed that when he was stopped a few kilometres from Barkham, he was within Barkham county but outside Barkham town.]
(reported by Phayul, 08 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Taktsang Lhamo, Dzoege county (Chin: Ruoergai Xian)

A deadline for absent monks to return: The continual harassment of monks at Kirti monastery has led many of them to return to their respective homes, leaving only senior monks who “suffer from severe emotional setbacks with the misconduct of the local Chinese authorities”. The authorities had ordered all absent monks to return by 5 July or face arrest.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Friday, 04 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo county (Chin: Kangding Xian)

Over 50 nuns from Pangri Na nunnery in Kardze county were arrested on 14 May [see Kardze, 14 May 2008; CTA 15/05/08]. Four have since been released. The rest of them are being detained in Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county, Karze [Kardze] TAP [as of 4th July 2008].
(reported by CTA, 04 July 2008)

  Thursday, 03 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Kyara Palden Drakpa, aged almost sixty years, died suddenly at his home during the evening. His two daughters, Tsering Tso and Ugyen Lhamo, both nuns from Watak (Samtenling) nunnery in Drakgo [Draggo] county, were arrested on 8 June for involvement in political activities. Subsequently, Kyara Palden Drakpa was often called by the PSB and “severely harassed” for “not providing proper advice to his daughters”.
(reported by CTA, 14 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti Dhongri monastery, Mehu-ru-ma village

Lobsang Tsultrim, a monk aged around sixteen years from Kirti Dhongri monastery committed suicide.
He had returned home and told his elder brother, “The Chinese official work teams have again arrived at the monastery. They have ordered the monks to assemble for the ‘education’. Again, they will not let us stay in peace”. Lobsang Tsultrim then walked out from his room. Around fifteen minutes later, his brother went to look for him; he had hanged himself using a rope in a nearby storeroom where firewood is kept.
Lobsang Tsultrim’s father’s name is Palkho.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tuesday, 01 July 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Khangmar monastery, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

When over 70 monks were conducting one of Khangmar (Gaeden Samdupling) monastery’s religious ceremonies which is held annually on 1 July, PSB and PAP officials arrived to raid the quarters of those five monks who were arrested between 14 and 22 June. The Chinese forces were met with strong opposition by the monks who refused to be bullied; the raid was temporarily postponed.
(reported by CTA, 04 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tenpa/Rongtrag (Chin: Danba), Tenpa/Rongtrag (Chin: Danba) county

Account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days; refers to himself as “one of the only few Tibetans, if not the only one, who managed to get into Tibetan territory at that time”.
Date unspecified, circa 1 July 2008: A poster was seen on the wall at the entrance of a hotel in Tanpa [Tenpa] (the wall “adjoined with that of the main long-distance bus-stand of Tanpa”); the poster was written entirely in Tibetan with the heading Zin-bZung bKa’-rgya" (Order for Arrest); black and white photocopied passport-style photographs of over thirty people.
(reported by Phayul, 23 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkor, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Date unspecified: in July, the Chinese authorities have “permanently” deployed forces in Tongkhor village; they check the identifications of Tibetan travellers and confiscate belongings; Tibetans are being threatened with detention, even if they are innocent, for refusing to part with their belongings.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Nyinmo township, Palbar (Chin: Bianba) county

Date unspecified: two men from Nyinmo township were arrested by the PSB “from the locality at the beginning of July”:

  1. Palden Choedak.
  2. Nyidor.
    They had reportedly spoken out against Chinese domination in government jobs and the PSB; they demanded equal employment opportunities for Tibetans.
    Two others were arrested by the county PSB for their alleged involvement in sharing information about the Tibet protests to the outside world:
  3. Lobsang Choejor, "a resident of the same township [in Palbar county, Chamdo Prefecture] and a monk of Bhenkar monastery in Driru county [Nagchu Prefecture].
  4. Dorjee Tashi, a layperson (elder brother of Lobsang Choejor).
    known.
    (reported by CTA, 15 July 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: A monk from Drepung monastery, Lhasa, was “recently” released after being arrested by Lhasa city PSB in March and severely beaten during interrogation [note: CTA did not provide the monk’s name].
The monk had already been imprisoned in Drapchi for over 13 years (1991 to 2004) for involvement in political activities, and sustained severe injuries when the prisoners staged a peaceful protest in 1998.
Following the March protests in Lhasa, most former political prisoners were arrested [note: other reports stated that former political prisoners were being arrested as early as 13 March 2008, on the eve of the riots in Lhasa]. Some of them were subsequently released but others remain in detention, their whereabouts unknown.
(reported by CTA, 02 July 2008)

Date unspecified: Passang (a.k.a. Tenzin Namgyal), a monk from Phagmo monastery in Taktse [Tagtse county], was released “in a deteriorated health condition recently”. He had been arrested in March by Lhasa city PSB and severely tortured in prison. Upon his release, he and his relatives were warned against “disclosing any information or photo on torture” or face harsh punishment.
Passang had been “imprisoned in August 1993 and tortured for six years in Drapchi Prison” for involvement in political activities.
(reported by CTA, 02 July 2008)

  Monday, 30 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

“On around 30 June”, two monks from Labrang monastery were “shifted to a prison in Lanzhou”; the Chinese forces had searched for them following their escape to “the mountain” during the recent protests. They were “arrested under gunfire” [it is assumed that they were arrested on 30 June and immediately taken to Lanzhou]. The two monks are:

  1. Tsultrim Gyatso, aged 37.
  2. Chone Khedup, aged around 40.
    (reported by CTA, 16 July 2008)
  Qinghai Province » Kyegudo TAP (Chin: Yushu) » Kyegudo/Jyekundo (Chin: Yushu/Jiegu) county

Date unspecified; June 2008: An unidentified man staged a peaceful protest while distributing and pasting leaflets in Kyegudo; arrested by Chinese authorities. The following day, two unidentified monks were arrested for protesting and distributing leaflets.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Date unspecified; June 2008: Ngag-gha and Dorjee Tashi, from Gyensang village in Karze [Kardze] county, were “arrested later” for “helping the peaceful protestors when they were being arrested by the PAPat the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

Date unspecified; some time in June: Ngawang Tashi or Ngagha (aged 18) from Jesang Dha village in Kardze county was arrested by the PAP for peacefully protesting at the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyitoe Phughu township, Serthar (Ch: Seda) county

Date unspecified; June 2008: Due to severe restrictions imposed by the Chinese authorities, the people of Nyitoe Phughu township wrote independence slogans on a hillside, visible from a great distance, by digging holes and filling them with white marble stones.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

Date unspecified: In June, a monk named Wanglo was beaten and arrested by the Chinese authorities for taking a photograph of a ‘patriotic re-education’ class in his village (the lower division of Tachok-tsang village in Serthar county).
When his relatives appealed for his release, the authorities demanded a 20,000 yuan fine.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Geynang village, Jomda (Chin: Jiangda) county

Date assumed to be 30 June; CTA had given the date as “31 June” (sic): Villagers requested the release of the four Tibetans who had been arrested on 29 June. An additional 32 Tibetans were then arrested; twenty-five were later released. Those who remain in detention are:

  1. Tsegyal, from Parwar Tsang family.
  2. Jamyang Tsering, from Momo Tsang family.
  3. Anyog.
  4. Palchen.
  5. Tsering.
  6. Chokdup.
  7. Sonam Dhargyal.
    (reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Woeser monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Date unspecified: In June, additional work teams from Lhasa and Chamdo arrived at Woeser monastery to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ to its monks. Orders had already been issued to the abbot and the senior monks to advise the monks against staging any protest, or else they shall be held responsible. The abbot is being watched closely by the work teams.
(reported by CTA, 14 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Mid June: some of those arrested for participating in protests on 15-16 March in Phenpo Lhundrup (Ch: Lingzhi) county were given arbitrary sentences a court in Lhasa city:

  1. Tenzin Lhamo, a girl from Ugyen Mey village in Gaden Choekhor township, [Phenpo] Lhundrup county; arbitrary sentence of ten years of imprisonment for merely participating in a peaceful protest in Lhundrup county on 16 March.
  2. Samdup, a man from “the same locality” [presumably also Ugyen Mey village]; sentenced to thirteen years in prison

Three others “including Kalden from Dhey village in Jangkha township, [Phenpo] Lhundrup county, were sentenced to 20, 17 and 12 years in prison”.
(reported by CTA, 31 July 2008)

Date unspecified: At the end of June, Anu, a man aged over 38 years, a resident of Paljor Rabten Khang in Lhasa who was shot during the March protests, succumbed to his injuries despite having undergone “every possible medical treatment at his home”.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phende Tse nunnery, Phenpo Lhundrup (Ch: Lingzhi) county

The nuns of Phende Tse nunnery (a branch of Nalanda monastery) who were arrested earlier were released recently [presumably in June 2008].
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Shar Bumpa nunnery, Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Date unspecified: Many of the nuns from Shar Bhumba nunnery who were arrested for participating in a two-day protest in Phenpo Lhundrup county in March were released recently [June]; due to “a strong request” from the local people and the nunnery, the local authorities “could not stop” them from re-entering their nunnery. However, they were expelled from the nunnery to their respective homes this month [presumably during June 2008].
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Sunday, 29 June 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Geynang village, Jomda (Chin: Jiangda) county

Suspecting the staging of a protest by the people of Geynang village following their harvest of a medicinal plant called caterpillar fungus (Cordyceps Sinensis), the Chinese authorities arrested four villagers including Tsegyal.
(reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)

  Saturday, 28 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

A document titled “Serious decisions to be taken against monasteries and monks/nuns for undertaking turbulent activities” was posted in Tibetan language on a “government information website” (URL provided as “www.ti.tibet.cn”) on 18 July. The “document” was “based on an earlier article” that appeared in the Tibet Daily newspaper [it it understood that both the article and the posting based on the article contained the entire text of the document].
A translation published by Tibet Watch carries the name Li Changping [possibly a signature on the original document], head of Kandze Autonomous Prefecture [Kardze TAP], and date 28 June 2008. The translation refers to “serious decisions” that were “settled at the third conference of the Executive Committee of concerned region”, and refers to new measures to deal with ‘subversive’ monasteries and nunneries in Kandze [Kardze] TAP; lists “various levels of punishment for monks or nuns who have taken part in protests, distributed flyers or raised the Tibetan flags”.
Families of monks and nuns who confess to ‘minor’ crimes are to be responsible for their ‘re-education’; religious leaders accused of collaborating with foreign ‘splittist’ groups are to be publicly humiliated on state television. A monk or nun charged with “quite serious” crimes will remain in custody until they tell the truth, confess their guilt and submit a shuyig (self-criticising letter). Severe punishment is prescribed for monasteries considered to have led protests in March and April. At monasteries where between 10% and 30% of monks took part in protests “all religious activities at the monastery will be halted. Movements of monks will be closely monitored”.
[Further categories of offences and prescribed measures are listed in full in the Tibet Watch report. Tibet Watch cited as “www.ti.tibet.cn” – an invalid URL; actually www.tibet.cn, the website of China Tibet Information Center. However, the posting appeared on the Tibetan language version, at http://zw.tibet.cn/news.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 October 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

China has ordered a “sweeping purge of Tibet’s ‘splittist’ monasteries” in the Kandze [Kardze] region, according to measures contained in an official “document” dated 28 June 2008, carrying the name Li Changping [possibly a signature on the original document], head of Kandze [Tibetan] Autonomous Prefecture. The “document” was posted in Tibetan language on a Chinese government’s Tibet information website (www.tibet.cn; Tibetan language version: http://zw.tibet.cn/news) on 18 July. However, the posting itself was “based on an earlier article” that appeared in the Tibet Daily newspaper [it appears that both the article and the posting based on the article contained the entire text of the document].
FTC’s translation of the document [specifically, a translation of the posting based on an earlier article] was independently verified by Tsering Topgyal at the London School of Economics [and trustee of Tibet Watch, FTC’s sister organisation]. The document reportedly contained details of “serious decisions” that were “settled at the third conference of the Executive Committee of concerned region”. The measures are “highly significant as they are to be implemented by the Kandze [Kardze] Tibetan Autonomous Prefectural Government” [note: FTC does not elaborate on this assumed significance]. Monks and nuns charged with “quite serious” crimes will undergo “serious re-education” [?] and will remain in custody until he/she “co-operates by telling the truth, confessing their guilt and submitting a shuyig (self-criticising letter). He/she must sincerely and voluntarily tell the truth”. Monks and nuns “with serious crime and attitude problem” will be “subjected to serious re-education” [?], dismissed from his/her monastery and his/her religious rights will removed. Monks and nuns not registered at the religious affairs office, or who have come from other regions, or who had been away from the monastery for a “very long time” will be “subject to dismissal from the monastery and their huts will be destroyed”. Severe punishment is prescribed for monasteries considered to have led protests in March and April. At monasteries where between 10% and 30% of monks took part in protests, “all religious activities at the monastery will be halted. Movements of monks will be closely monitored”.
[Further categories of offences and prescribed measures are listed in full in the FTC press release.]
(reported by FTC, 01 October 2008)

According to orders contained in an official document signed by Li Changping, the prefecture head, and posted only in Tibetan language on the Chinese government’s Tibet information website, China is planning a sweeping purge of Tibetan monasteries, including banning all worship at those deemed to be major centres of subversion. The document records decisions made by the local Communist Party cadres’ executive committee. Monks with “attitude problems”, or who refuse to change their thinking in line with official demands, will be dismissed or jailed; abbots and other leaders who fail to carry out government orders to “re-educate” their charges will be replaced by the regime’s appointees.
The most drastic action is promised against monasteries where ten to 30 per cent of monks were involved in protests; all religious activities at the monastery will be halted; movements of monks will be closely monitored. All monks or nuns at these monasteries will be required to “re-register”; those who fail loyalty tests will be dismissed and their accommodation demolished.
(reported by The Telegraph, 27 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

At around 2:30pm, three monks from Noobsur monastery in Serthar county were arrested for shouting slogans [location of the protest not stated].

  1. Trulku Gedun.
  2. Sashe.
  3. Gyachuk Wangchuk (Yangchuk).
    (reported by CTA, 04 July 2008)
  Friday, 27 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dura, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

Kalsang Lhamo from Dura village in Karze [Kardze] county died on 27 June; her death was reportedly caused by “intense harassment by the Chinese authorities”, including the arrest of her daughter, Tsewang Khando (aged 38, a nun of Dragkar nunnery), and the Chinese repression of the people of her village.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Samtenling nunnery, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

On 8 June, the nuns from Samten Ling [Samtenling, a.k.a. Watak] nunnery had gone to support a peaceful protest staged by Tsering Tso (also a Samten Ling nun) but were stopped en route, then confined to the nunnery for around nineteen days; forced to undergo ‘patriotic re-education’. These classes were met with continued opposition from the nuns. Consequently, at around 4pm on 27 June the Chinese authorities expelled all the nuns and handed them over to their respective families, leaving only an attendant at the nunnery.
Tsering Tso and Ugyen Lhamo, both arrested on 8 June, are still being detained. A nun named Guru has been missing since the protest; the authorities have denied that she was arrested.
(reported by CTA, 06 July 2007)

  Thursday, 26 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dragkar nunnery, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

PAP and PSB arrived at Dragkar nunnery and arbitrarily arrested Tsering Wangchuk, one of the head nuns.
(reported by CTA, 04 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Jianchao announced that “foreign journalists in China” are “allowed to apply for entering Tibet […] in line with previous procedure”, but they should abide by arrangement of local authorities since uncertainty still exists.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 26 June 2008)

  Wednesday, 25 June 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Tibet greeted its first foreign tourists, a Swedish couple who arrived by air, “marking the full opening of Tibet to all overseas and domestic tour groups after a stoppage of more than three months”. The couple, 77-year-old Kurt Persson and 62-year-old Eva Sandstrom, were aware they were the first foreign tourists after the 14 March riot. Sandstrom: “We have no worries about the safety here. It’s no problem. The only worry was to get the permission to come to Tibet. We heard that the Tibetan people are kind and friendly”. The couple were scheduled to leave for Beijing by train on Monday.
The TAR government stopped issuing tourist permits to overseas travellers and the tourism authorities suggested travel agencies postpone organising tour groups in the wake of the riot, citing safety concerns and the reconstruction of tourism facilities. Independent domestic travellers have not been prohibited from entering the region.
A second group of foreign tourists, four Singaporeans, were due to arrive on Sunday.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 25 June 2008)

Tibet is open once again to foreign tourists, who were barred from entering the autonomous region following the 14 March riot in Lhasa; two Swedish tourists will be the first to arrive, on 25 June; four Singaporean tourists will arrive on 29 June. Domestic tour groups have been allowed into Tibet since late April, followed by visitors from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan in May; as of 20 June, the region had received more than 160 tour groups.
(reported by CCTV, 25 June 2008)

The Chinese authorities began processing applications for foreign nationals to visit the TAR; although the Tibetan frontiers have re-opened to tourism, tours are expected to be severely restricted; Drepung and Sera monasteries are not open to visitors. The Potala Palace, Jokhang temple and Norbulingka are fully open; tour companies such as KE Adventure Travel are confident that visitors can “move throughout the country freely” but there are “no guarantees”; monasteries can “open and close on a day-to-day basis”.
(reported by The Observer, 06 July 2008)

Tibet welcomed its first batch of foreign tourists after a hiatus of more than three months; the first two foreigners to arrive in the regional capital were from Sweden; four tourists from Singapore were expected to arrive on 29 June. Tibet has regained social order with the resumption of schools, businesses and religious activities, as well as the re-opening of Jokhang, Ramoche, Sera and Drepung monasteries.
Tibet re-opened to domestic tour groups on 23 April, followed by visitors from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan in May.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 26 June 2008)

According to the Tibet Information Office, the TAR reopened to foreign tourists on 25 June; all attractions in Tibet, except Drepun, Ganden and Samye monasteries are receiving visitors.
Due to the “recent rioting in Lhasa”, parts of the infrastructure were “seriously damaged” and Tibet suspended tourism “out of consideration for the safety of foreign tourists”.
(reported by Travel China Guide, 25 June 2008)

  Tuesday, 24 June 2008
  Qinghai Province » Siling Municipality (Chin: Xining Shi) » Siling (Chin: Xining)

The Olympic flame concluded its [Qinghai] tour in Xining, the last stop of the torch relay’s 3-day leg in “multi-ethnic” Qinghai province. Thousands gathered in Central Square at 8am for the start of the relay, “holding a forest of the five star red flags”, hailing “Go Olympics, Go China”. Torchbearers included Han, Hui, Tibetan, Tu and Mongolian.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 24 June 2008)

The Olympic torch arrived in Xining; the planned 28.5 km relay curtailed to 8.8 km. The torch was originally supposed to pass through Ta’er Temple [Tib: Kumbum monastery] in Huangzhong [Tib: Kumbum] county, the Dalai Lama’s childhood home, but that part was cancelled. Each of the 291 runners ran for about ten metres
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Ba-Chodae monastery, Bathang county (Chin: Batang xian)

Security intense in Kardze county [town] following a number of protests in recent days. People afraid to speak for fear of detention; a Kardze monks stated: “It is very dangerous there now”; “All the telephone lines are being tapped”. A Kardze man now resident in Chengdu reported that he has been unable to call his family for several days.
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Buruna nunnery, Kardze county

Date unspecified, possibly circa 24 June 2008: Security forces were deployed in Buruna nunnery and in other monasteries in the area; nuns leaving the buildings to visit the toilets were being followed.
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Seda county

Date unspecified, possibly circa 24 June 2008: According to a monk in Kardze, “Apparently a few people got arrested in Seda county after they transmitted certain information by telephone. Nobody dares to say anything at all now”.
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Yaten nunnery, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

Date unspecified, possibly circa 24 June 2008: Security forces were deployed in Yaten nunnery and in other monasteries in the area; nuns leaving the buildings to visit the toilets were being followed.
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

  Monday, 23 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Bheri monastery, Kardze (Ch: Ganzi), Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) county

A “fire incidence occurred” on the Bheri Bridge over the Mekong River, near Bheri monastery. The Chinese authorities subsequently intensified restrictions at the monastery.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Fourteen people detained in Kardze “yesterday” [assumed to be 23 June considering the report was published on 24 June] after giving out leaflets calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and for freedom for the Tibetan people; there “weren’t many” monks among them, according to a Kardze monk. There were six separate attempts to hand out these leaflets during the course of a single day. Armed police descended on them as they were handing out the leaflets, grabbed them, and beat them. All the shops in Kardze town were closed.
The same source reported that a disabled Tibetan man was also detained for handing out leaflets in Kardze town “on Monday” [23 June 2008].
[Notes: RFA quoted a Kardze monk as saying that 14 people were detained “yesterday”; it is not stated, and therefore it is likely to be assumed that this comment was made on the day that RFA published this information and therefore that the detentions occurred on Monday 23 June 2008. However, RFA’s report also refers to the arrest of four monks from Khangmar monastery and 10 or 11 Tibetans from Gyasur village on Sunday 22 June 2008 – which also amounts to 14 or 15 people detained. Therefore, it would appear that RFA’s inclusion of “yesterday” is misleading and that the 14 arrests occurred two days before RFA’s report. This can be verified according to Kardze, 22 June 2008; CTA, 23/06/08.
The second incident – the detention of a disabled Tibetan man specifically “on Monday” – was mentioned six paragraphs later in RFA’s report, thus appearing to be a separate incident from the aforementioned 14 detained. CTA reported the arrest of just one man in Kardze town on the Monday – see Kardze, 23 June 2008; CTA, 10/07/08.]
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

County government ‘work teams’ have visited villages including Me-nyenda, near Bheri monastery, on and around 23 June; villagers “threatened with their lives against staging any protest”.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

Ngodup Dorjee, aged 25, from Phuk-Yi-Nang-Tsek-Lek village in Lhopa township, Karze [Karze] county, staged a peaceful protest in the market of the county [Kardze town] at 10:30am. He shouted slogans: “Dalai Lama should be invited to Tibet”, “We want religious freedom”, “Tibet belongs to Tibetans”. PAP personnel beat him with metal batons and then took him away.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Sunday, 22 June 2008
  Qinghai Province » Siling Municipality (Chin: Xining Shi) » Siling (Chin: Xining)

The Olympic flame concluded its three-day Qinghai province journey in Xining, “witnessing ethnic diversity and unity”. Nearly half of the 377 torchbearers chosen by Qinghai itself belong to minority ethnic groups, including 66 Tibetans; the number only ranks second after Tibetan torchbearers in neighbouring Tibet Autonomous Region.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 24 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsonub M&TAP (Chin: Haixi) » Golmud (Chin: Ge'ermu)

Jigme Phuntsok, a 22-year-old monk from Drepung monastery, Lhasa, died from torture in a prison located in Gormo [Golmud, a.k.a. Nagormo; Chin: Ge’ermu], Amdo [Chin: Qinghai Province].
Jigme Phuntsok was born in Gyalpo Ngulchu village, Rebgong (Chin: Tongren) county in Malho TAP, Qinghai province; his father’s name is Yangpa. Jigme Phuntsok was arrested from Lhasa during the protests in March and taken to Gormo; a large number of monks arrested in Lhasa reportedly taken to Gormo, Lanzhou, and other places.
Instead of handing over his body to the family, it was cremated by the Chinese authorities.
The death toll stands at 210.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

Jigme Phuntsok, a monk arrested from Drepung monastery and then transferred to a prison in Gormo [Golmud, a.k.a. Nagormo; Chin: Ge’ermu; in Qinghai Province], is reported to have died from torture on 22 June.
[Note: CTA stated that Jigme Phuntsok was a friend of Lobsang, a monk from Dzongkar monastery in Rebgong [Rebkong] county, Malho TAP, Qinghai Province, who was arrested while studying at Drepung monastery in Lhasa. Therefore it is implied that Jigme Phuntsok was also from Dzongkar monastery and was studying at Drepung at the time of his arrest.]
(reported by CTA, 14 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Bayan (Palung; Chin: Hualong) Hui AC

Messages are being sent by the local Tibetan people saying: “As our area is outnumbered by Hui and Han Chinese, it has been very difficult even to carry out even a minor [political] activity. It’s not because we don’t have courage and loyalty to our cause. We stand in solidarity with all the Tibetans, in and outside Tibet. We hope that all the Tibetans will come to know about our situation”.
(reported by CTA, 26 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Gyalgyud monastery, Bayan (Palung; Chin: Hualong) Hui AC

The monks of Gyalgyud monastery county were not allowed to conduct their annual cham (ritual dance) on 22 June. The monasteries are also restricted from performing other religious activities.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Tak monastery, Tak-tsang township, Bayan (Palung; Chin: Hualong) Hui AC

Circa 22 June (date unclear): The monks of Tak monastery were not allowed to conduct their annual cham (ritual dance). The Chinese authorities “have already given them restriction orders from conducting their annual Cham on 10 August” [?]. The monasteries are also restricted from performing other religious activities.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Four monks from Khangmar monastery in Kardze protested in the town; shouted slogans calling for Tibetan independence and the return of the Dalai Lama; detained after protesting for only a short time.

  1. Tsering Phuntsok, aged 24.
  2. Tashi Sherab, aged 36, of the Kulu Dapon family.
  3. Serga, aged 37, from the Kulu Wulu family.
  4. Yeshe Dhargyal, aged 27.

Three hours later, 10 or 11 Tibetans from Gyasur village in Kardze county protested; armed police dispersed the crowd using tear gas; the protesters were later detained.
(reported by RFA, 24 June 2008)

At least three protests carried out in Karze [Kardze] county. Palmo, a 17-year-old girl, and Karma Wangchuk, a 29-year-old man, were severely beaten and arrested by the PAP for participating in a peaceful protest “led by over 20 people – some sources said it is by over 10 people – at over 3pm”.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

At around 11am, 24-year-old Tsering Phuntsok and 36- year-old Tashi Sherab, both monks at Khangmar monastery in Kardze county, staged a peaceful demonstration in Kardze town.
At 1pm, 37-year-old Sergha and 27-year-old Yeshi Dargye, both monks at Khangmar monastery protested by “distributing pamphlets and calling for a free Tibet, and praying for the long life of the Dalai Lama and the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet”.
All four monks were reportedly beaten and arrested by Chinese armed forces.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 July 2008)

At around 11am, Tsering Phuntsok and Tashi Sherab, both monks from Khangmar monastery in Karze [Kardze] county, were arrested by PSB and PAP for staging a peaceful protest at the county government office.
At 1pm, Sergha and Yeshi Dhargye, both monks from Khangmar monastery, carried out a peaceful protest; severely beaten and arrested by PAP and PSB.
At around 3pm, over 10 people led by a layperson from Gyensang village, Karze [Kardze] county, staged a peaceful protest at the county government office; immediately arrested by PAP and PSB.
The protestors shouted slogans such as “Tibet is an independent country”, “His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be welcomed to Tibet” and “long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”.
(reported by CTA, 23 June 2008)

Sherab Gyaltsen (aged 36) from Sheling Dha village, Kardze county, and Nyilu (aged 35) from Gyurgha village, Kardze county, were severely beaten and arrested when they carried out a peaceful protest at the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Lobsang Chopel, a senior monk at Sera monastery, told foreign reporters on an official visit that in his youth he was given spiritual lessons by the Dalai Lama but with government officials looking on, the 77-year-old monk dismissed the Dalai Lama as a political figure: “In terms of religion, we believe in the Dalai Lama, but I don’t believe or accept what he says or what he does”.
Lhasa is a city where “anxiety and tension, and not Games excitement” dominates people’s lives.
Fewer Chinese tourists are visiting than last year; many taxi drivers are becoming bankrupt; a Chinese taxi driver said “It will be a long time before Lhasa returns to normal – two years, I’d say”. He added, “Tibetans are tough to live with, they’ll fight you at the drop of a hat […] 14 March wasn’t an exception. It was what we have to put up with”.
Lhasa remains divided by a gulf of distrust between Tibetans and ethnic Chinese.
(reported by Reuters, 22 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa Municipality

Chinese officials abruptly cancelled a planned government-organised tour by foreign media to the Jokhang temple in Lhasa, without explanation. The foreign reporters were instead taken to Sera monastery, where police could be seen keeping a watchful eye on its monks. A monk was asked by foreign reporters if he wished the exiled Dalai Lama to return; he responded: “I have nothing to say because I am just a small lama. Those decisions are up to the government”.
Following tight security in the city on Saturday 21 June, the city “appeared to be back to normal” on Sunday, with “no obvious security presence”. Later, reporters were taken to the Potala Palace, which was closed to tourists during the reporters’ visit; reporters were not allowed to wander away from the group.
(reported by AFP, 22 June 2008)

  Saturday, 21 June 2008
  Qinghai Province » Tsonub M&TAP (Chin: Haixi) » Golmud (Chin: Ge'ermu)

The Olympic flame arrived in Qinghai’s Golmud by flight from Lhasa in the afternoon, ready for the relay in Golmud on Sunday, and then Qinghai Lake and Xining. Tibetan Torchbearer Cega, director of the Hol Xil Natural Reserve Administration, said: “To the Tibetan people, the March 14 riot in Lhasa is a dishonour, a disgrace”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 21 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

A Tibetan youth named Dragu, of Khashul village, Dado township in Kardze county, was reportedly beaten and detained by seven PAP officers upon his arrival at the market [square in Kardze town]; he was wearing a white band tied around his head carrying the words Free Tibet, and had Tibetan flags painted on both cheeks.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 July 2008)

Nyima Tashi (aged 18) from Sheling village in Kardze county was arrested for shouting slogans at the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

Jampa Choephel, a 25-year-old from Me-nyenda village in Karze [Kardze] county, staged a pro-independence protest at around 11am; carried Tibetan flag and pro-independence banner; his head was “covered with a scarf attached with a photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama”; shouted slogans such as “Tibet is an independent country” and “long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. Jampa Choephel was severely beaten and arrested by the PAP.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

Many protests carried out in Karze [Kardze] county when the Olympic torch reached Lhasa on 21 June.
Draghu, a youth from Khashul village in Dhado township, Karze [Kardze] county, staged a pro-independence protest at the county market; a white band across his forehead read “independence for Tibet”; Tibetan flags painted on both cheeks. While protesting, he distributed pamphlets containing “9-point demand” stating that the Dalai Lama “must be welcomed to Tibet”, calling for human rights in Tibet and the release all political prisoners. The PSB arrested him, tied his legs and arms.
Around four youths staged a separate peaceful protest in Karze [Kardze] county.
Additional PAP personnel deployed in the county.
(reported by CTA, 24 June 2008)

Peaceful protest outside the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti Dhongru monastery, Ngaba (Ch: Aba) county

Date unspecified; circa 21 June 2008: The monks of Kirti Dhongru monastery in Ngaba county are being severely harassed; forced to undergo intensive ‘patriotic re-education’. PAP personnel are camped near down the monastery and have imposed “heavy restrictions” on the monks’ movements.
Five monks from Kirti Dhongru monastery arrested in March have been transferred from Maowun (Chin: Maoxian) county prison to Kakhog [Hungyon] (Chin: Hongyuan) county prison; relatives are not allowed to visit.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The Tibetan government in exile’s Central Tibetan Administration announced that it is yet to receive independent confirmation of the release of 1,157 Tibetan prisoners charged with minor offences by courts in Lhasa, as reported by China’s Xinhua news agency on 20 June. CTA noted that, according to Xinhua, defendants from minority ethnic groups were provided with interpreters at court sessions, which ensured their rights; however, CTA added that the Chinese government has thwarted some Chinese lawyers who had volunteered to offer legal assistance to Tibetan detainees, and suspended the licenses of two prominent human rights lawyers involved in this campaign.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

The BBC’s headline read “China stages torch relay in Tibet”: the Olympic torch has been carried through Lhasa amid heavy security. The 11 kilometre (seven mile) parade passed off smoothly, with the flame carried past apparently hand-picked spectators; each member of the crowd has a badge, suggesting that spectators were specially chosen or vetted for the ceremony. Torch bearers in tracksuits carried the Olympic flame through Lhasa’s streets, beginning at the Norbulingka. The closing ceremony took place in front of the Potala Palace where officials gave speeches.
The BBC’s correspondent reported a “staggering security presence” in Lhasa and passed through at least six checkpoints as he was driven in an official convoy to the start of the relay. “We saw very clearly several dozen soldiers wearing riot gear – a reminder that Lhasa is not a normal city”.
(reported by BBC, 21 June 2008)

The Olympic torch was paraded through the streets of Tibet’s capital; tight security accompanied the flame over its three-hour journey; hundreds of police and paramilitary troops lined the route; the roughly six mile run began at Norbulingka and ended at the square in front of the Potala Palace. Onlookers, who had been carefully screened beforehand, waved flags and chanted “go China”. About half of the 156 torch runners were ethnic Tibetan. The Lhasa leg saw the reunion of the main torch with a separate one carried earlier to the top of Mount Everest.
Foreign reporters were required to travel in a closely guarded convoy and only allowed to cover the opening and closing legs, isolating them from contact with ordinary residents. Lhasa all but shutdown for the relay, with streets deserted and most shops closed. A security cordon was thrown up around Potala Square, where costumed performers entertained the onlookers.
(reported by AP, 21 June 2008)

Foreign journalists prevented from freely covering the Olympic flame in Tibet and Xinjiang. Only about 50 foreign journalists were allowed to report on the passage of the flame through Lhasa; nearly half were from media outlets in Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan, handpicked by the Chinese government. No US or British daily paper was allowed in. International news agencies and some TV stations with rights to broadcast the Beijing Games were allowed two days in Lhasa.
Local people told to stay indoors; journalists forbidden to talk to local people and barred from going to the Jokhang temple and the old city; guided to Potala and Sera monastery. A large number of uniformed and plainclothes police filmed the journalists’ every move; very few monks they could talk to and question. Journalists were kept in a park opposite the [Norbulingka] where the [torch relay began]; journalists not allowed to follow the flame.
A Canadian reporter asked why all shops were shut; the reporter was told that shops in Tibet were always “closed on a Saturday (21 June)”; which is not true. Those watching [the torch relay] were chosen by the authorities; police lined the whole route; military checkpoints throughout the city.
A Tibetan official said most of the 1,300 people [the figure provided by the Chinese authorities] arrested after the demonstrations in March had been released, but there was no way [for the journalists] to verify this.
Chinese official media showed no film of military police present as the flame passed through Lhasa and Kashgar.
(reported by RWB, 24 June 2008)

Two-hour Olympic torch relay through Lhasa; streets had barbed-wire barriers; thousands of paramilitary and regular police present to prevent protests.
Invited guests were allowed into the opening and closing ceremonies; most ordinary Tibetans were kept far away from the torch route; aside from the torch route, Lhasa was almost deserted; residents told to stay inside their homes, unless they had a special pass allowing them to cheer for the torch. Hundreds of shops along the torch route were shuttered.
A small group of foreign journalists, invited to Lhasa for a government-sponsored press tour, were not permitted to see any of the nine-kilometre run except the beginning and end; passed through barbed-wire checkpoint and other security checks before they were permitted to the opening ceremony.
At the end of the relay, the torch was greeted by “a carefully choreographed display of ethnic dancing and rhythmic flag-waving from thousands of school children and other hand-picked spectators”. They cheered as the torch arrived in front of the Potala Palace. Chinese officials “took advantage of the Olympic event to launch another verbal blast at the Dalai Lama”. Zhang Qingli said: “We will certainly be able to totally smash the splittist schemes of the Dalai Lama clique”. He spoke through an interpreter “because he is not fluent in the Tibetan language”.
(reported by Globe and Mail, 21 June 2008)

Journalists on the government-sponsored press tour to Lhasa and who had left their hotel on Friday evening were reprimanded by a government minder, who claimed to be worried about their personal safety, despite the security presence. The minder made a vague reference to “intelligence” reports about possible attacks.
When asked why all the shops near the Olympic torch route were shuttered on Saturday, one minder claimed that Lhasa’s shops are always closed on Saturdays [which is not true].
Monks were kept far out of sight during the press tour. A journalist found a monk in a back corner of Sera monastery; he said nothing, but burst quietly into tears.
Globe and Mail journalist Geoffrey York talked to a few Tibetan shopkeepers near the Jokhang temple; they were too wary to say much, but they made it clear they were suffering greatly from China’s decision to prohibit foreign tourists from entering Tibet.
(reported by Globe and Mail, 22 June 2008)

The Olympic torch was carried through the streets of Lhasa, cheered by crowds of Chinese residents and protected by police and paramilitary forces. Most shops and businesses in Lhasa were shut and the ethnic Tibetan inhabitants were “conspicuous by their absence” along the route. Zhang Qingli, the head of the Communist party in Tibet, spoke at a rally to greet the torch outside the Potala Palace, and pledged to “totally smash” the “Dalai Lama clique”. It was unclear how Zhang’s rhetoric accorded with China’s insistence that the Olympics should not be politicised. Chinese officials said 156 torchbearers, half of them Tibetans, took turns to carry the flame. Xinhua, said all 2.8m [sic] Tibetans had been looking forward to the event.
(reported by The Times, 22 June 2008)

Thousands of youths holding the People’s Republic of China’s national flags chanted “play up China”, “good luck Beijing” and “good luck Olympic Games” to celebrate the Olympic torch relay; they also denounced “separatism activities” by the “Dalai Lama clique”, who “sabotaged the relay in foreign countries”. Many youths had gathered outside the Potala Palace on Friday evening. On Saturday, the Beijing Olympic torch was carried from the Norbulingka to the Potala Palace by 156 bearers, following a one-minute silence for those killed in the earthquake in Sichuan on 12 May. Security was tight in Lhasa for fears of “sabotage activities by the Dalai clique”. Palma Trily, executive vice chairman of [the TAR] said police have been deployed to ensure security during the relay, but none were from the PLA, whose duty was to “guard the frontier and protect the territory”. [Xinhua’s article then quoted several Tibetans who allegedly oppose Tibetan independence and the Dalai Lama.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 21 June 2008)

Olympic torch relay held in Lhasa amid tight security; paramilitary police watched the event closely from the ground and surrounding buildings.
The torch was carried first by 75-year-old Tibetan mountaineer Gonpo at the Norbulingka. Hand-picked spectators waved flags and cheered runners: “Good luck Beijing”, “Good wishes for the Olympics” in unison. The area was closed off to all but those given special passes for the relay; many locals were told to stay at home; shops along the relay route were closed. An employee at the Tibet International Hotel told AFP, “We are not supposed to leave the hotel to watch the relay, so we are staying inside”. No monks were seen around the Potala Palace and in neighbouring areas; a taxi driver (on Friday) said, “They all stay in their monasteries and they can’t go out”.
Tibetan singer Caidan Zhuoma [Tib: Tseten Dolma] ran the flame up to the Potala Palace where it was combined with the special flame that was carried up the Mount Everest.
Citing the 12 May Sichuan earthquake, the Chinese government shortened the original route in Tibet to just one day instead of three; then from eight hours to three, and finally to less than two hours. The carefully-staged event ended apparently without incident.
(reported by AFP, 21 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

Protests “seem to have occurred” in Sera monastery; during the night of 18 June (the 15th day of the 4th month of the Tibetan lunar calendar; considered to be the most holy day of the year), PAP personnel arrested 12 monks.
(reported by tibetcustom.com, 21 June 2008)

  Friday, 20 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Peaceful protest outside the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

As of 20 June, the whereabouts of Lobsang Wangchuk, Tashi, and his son Phuntsok Tsewang, are unknown. They are from Drepung monastery, where they were arrested by PAP personnel.
Wangchuk, aged 45, was born in Lhasa; he was among a group of 90 monks arrested in mid April.
Tashi was born in Lhokha and ordained as a Buddhist monk “at an old age” [it is assumed that Tashi and Phuntsok Tsewang were also arrested in mid-April].
(reported by CTA, 20 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

An increased security presence this week; several hundred police, some of them armed, on the streets of central Lhasa, in particularly on the road leading from the Norbulinga [Norbulingka] in central Lhasa to the Potala Palace.
Tibetans have been banned from performing the Lingkor circumambulation (a tradition on the fifteenth day of Saga Dawa – 18 June 2008).
Only Tibetans “in certain jobs” were allowed to apply for the special permit to watch the arrival of the Olympic torch in Lhasa on 21 June.
Telephone calls to Lhasa have been significantly more difficult in the last few days.
(reported by FTC, 20 June 2008)

China says it has released more than a thousand people and sentenced 12 others for alleged involvement in anti-government riots in Llasa in March [See Xinhua entry for Lhasa, 20 June]. China made the announcement two days after Amnesty International published a report urging China to reveal what happened to more than a thousand people arrested during the government crackdown on protesters.
(reported by VOA, 20 June 2008)

Tibet is still closed to foreign tourists. Foreign journalists have been allowed to visit only as part of closely monitored government tours [including at this time for the Lhasa leg of the Olympic torch relay]. Palma Trily, the vice-governor of Tibet’s Chinese-appointed administration, told foreign reporters that 12 more people had been sentenced for taking part in the 14 March riot in the city; he gave no details about their offences or the punishments meted out. He said another 1,157 people had been released from detention over minor offences related to the violent anti-government protests. Chinese officials accuse the Dalai Lama of trying to sabotage the Beijing Olympics and preparing “suicide squads” to carry out attacks.
(reported by AP, 21 June 2008)

Reporters representing about 30 international news organisations have been allowed into Lhasa in a closely monitored group to cover the torch relay. According to Chinese officials, a planned three-day torch relay in Tibet [the TAR] had been cut to one day because of schedule adjustments linked to last month’s Sichuan earthquake. On Friday evening, small crowds of people wandered in Potala Square, as performers practised for Saturday’s Olympic torch relay ceremonies. The BBC’s correspondent also saw four military trucks near the area, two of which were filled with soldiers in riot gear.
(reported by BBC, 21 June 2008)

Lhasa was under tight security – troops and police – as it prepared to host the Olympic Games torch on Saturday 21 June; Baima Chilin [Tib: Pema Thinley] a vice chairman of the TAR, said Dalai Lama supporters wanted to upset the event.
A group of foreign journalists arrived in Lhasa; police stood on guard every 200 metres; trucks full of troops and riot police were also present; slogans on billboards and village walls welcomed the Olympics and urged locals not to cause trouble for the torch relay. Police searched passers-by near the Potala Palace; a stallholder said families were told to stay at home during the torch procession.
The Lhasa relay has been drastically shortened from the 27 kilometres to 9 kilometres, allegedly out of respect for victims of China’s devastating earthquake. Authorities have told Lhasa residents that they are ready and willing to “severely punish” and “give no indulgence” to any attempted disruption of the torch relay.
(reported by Reuters, 20 June 2008)

Chinese state media claimed that 29 foreign media organisations were invited to Lhasa for a government-sponsored press tour to Lhasa and Olympic torch relay. The group was heavily weighted towards TV crews. One media organisation invited from each major country. The U.S. represented only by an NBC crew; New York Times and Washington Post were excluded. Britain represented by a BBC crew; nobody allowed from the Times, the Telegraph, the Guardian. No U.S. or British newspapers invited. Almost half of the invited journalists were from Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau.
Globe and Mail journalist Geoffrey York reported unsolicited wake-up calls at 6.15am; an itinerary (7.30am to 10.30pm) filled with “weirdly irrelevant events”: a handicrafts exhibition, a visit to a tourist village, and a press conference to announce a performance of traditional dance. Lodged in a government hotel, far from the historic centre of Lhasa.
At the allocated dinner time, Geoffrey York “managed to slip away from the hotel and hail a taxi to the old town”; saw the massive security presence, including thousands of paramilitary police in camouflage uniforms, in advance of the Olympic torch relay the next day; paramilitary troops and regular police on every corner.
Geoffrey York filed his first story on Friday and later looked at the Globe’s website – China’s censors had blocked the story; first few paragraphs visible but then it ended mid-sentence and the website crashed.
[See also Lhasa, Saturday 21 June 2008; The Globe and Mail, 22/06/08.]
(reported by Globe and Mail, 22 June 2008)

Press conference for a 50-strong delegation of journalists, including staff from 29 overseas news organisations. Palma Trily [Tib: Pema Thinley], TAR executive vice chairman, said the TAR government was “confident to have a safe and successful Olympic torch relay on Saturday” [Palma Trily paraphrased by Xinhua]; five organisations including the Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC) and Tibetan Women’s Association (TWA) had threatened to sabotage the torch relay. He said police have been deployed to ensure security during the relay, “but there was none from the People’s Liberation Army (PLA)” [Palma Trily paraphrased by Xinhua], as “the duty of the PLA is to guard the frontier and protect the territory” [quotation: Palma Trily].
Dekyi Drolkar, director of Tibet’s sports bureau, said the Olympic torch relay in Tibet would have 156 torch bearers including 75 Tibetans. The Lhasa leg would cover 9.3 kilometres “from Norbu Lingka Square and end in Potala Palace”. The torch’s relay schedule in Tibet was originally planned for three days, 19-21 June, but was cut to one day on which the “flame kindled on the top of Mount Qomolangma” [Everest] on 8 May will “join the main torch”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 20 June 2008)

Courts in the TAR handed down punishments on 19 and 20 June to 12 people who had been involved in the Lhasa riot in March. To date, forty-two people [included 30 charged on 29 April] have been convicted of “arson, robbery, the crime of gathering to assault state organs, and other crimes”; they received criminal punishments from courts for their actions; the punishments for 29 of the convicts have “gone effective”. Defendants from minority ethnic groups were provided with interpreters at court sessions, which “ensured their rights”. Another 116 people in custody are awaiting trial.
Tibet has released 1,157 people involved in the March Lhasa riot, who were charged with minor offences. Tibet police detained and arrested 953 people after the riot, while 362 others “surrendered to police”.
Judicial authorities followed the policy of “combining punishment with leniency” in handling the cases, which means “leniency for those with minor offences”.
[Note: no details are provided of the actual “criminal punishments”; the sentencing and Xinhua’s announcement of the sentencing occurred on the eve of the Olympic torch relay in Lhasa.]
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 20 June 2008)

As of 20 June, the whereabouts of three student monks, visitors at Drepung monastery arrested in Lhasa on 10 March, remains unknown:

  1. Pema Tsering.
  2. Pema.
  3. Samten.

They are from Dingkha village, Chusang township, Toelung Dechen (Chin: Duilongdeqing) county, Lhasa Municipality.
Relatives have enquired about them at every prison and detention centre in and around Lhasa.
(reported by CTA, 20 June 2008)

On 19 and 20 June, four courts in Lhasa and Shannan [Tib: Lhoka] Prefecture “announced prison terms” for 12 people for their involvement in the 14 March Lhasa riot, bringing the total number of sentenced people to 42 (the first 30 were sentenced on 29 April).
[Note: although Xinhua reported these sentences on 20/06/08, it is not clear why Xinhua reported this news again on 11/07/08.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 11 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhoka Prefecture (Chin: Shannan) » Lhoka Prefecture (Chin: Shannan)

On 19 and 20 June, four courts in Lhasa and Shannan [Tib: Lhoka] Prefecture “announced prison terms” for 12 people for their involvement in the 14 March Lhasa riot, bringing the total number of sentenced people to 42 (the first 30 were sentenced on 29 April).
[Note: although Xinhua reported these sentences on 20/06/08, it is not clear why Xinhua reported this news again on 11/07/08.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 11 July 2008)

The initial leg of the Olympic torch relay in Tibet, originally scheduled to start from Lhoka prefecture on Friday 20 June, was cancelled in favour of a single day event in Lhasa on Saturday.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 18 June 2008)

  Thursday, 19 June 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Chengdu, Sichuan Province

Account by Dhawa Dhondup (Acharya), a Tibetan living in Sydney who entered Tibetan areas of Sichuan Province in the third week of June 2008 and stayed for 20 days; refers to himself as “one of the only few Tibetans, if not the only one, who managed to get into Tibetan territory at that time”.
Date unspecified, circa 19 June 2008: Chengdu feels like an open city for travellers, despite ubiquitous close-circuit cameras on the ceilings of the hotels; when you check in, your passport is photocopied and sent to PSB; you are asked where you have come from and to where you are going.
Outwardly things in Chengdu do not appear too restrictive except for the heavy police presence, day and night, in Wuwuqi Street (the Tibetan area of Chengdu) monitoring the Tibetans.
(reported by Phayul, 23 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Bheri monastery, Kardze (Ch: Ganzi), Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) county

Following the arrest of three Beri [Bheri] monastery monks on 18 June, the Chinese authorities sent ‘work teams’ to provide ‘patriotic re-education’ to the monks of Beri monastery; this could not be conducted due to opposition from the monks.
(reported by CTA, 24 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Lobsang Tsewang (aged 30) from Tsoshi village in Kardze county staged a peaceful protest at the county government office. He was severely beaten and arrested by the PAP.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

On or around 19 June: Ngawang Lhundup and Kal Nyima, two monks from Karze [Kardze] monastery, were severely beaten and arrested by the PAP for holding a peaceful protest in front of the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

Youdroom, a monk from Koe-tsa village in Serthar county, staged a peaceful protest at 2pm in front of the county government office; waved Tibetan flag, shouted slogans: “Tibet is an independent country, long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama, His Holiness the Dalai Lama must return to Tibet”. When others gathered in his support, Youdroom was arrested by the PSB.
(reported by CTA, 29 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

At a press conference for Indian and Italian journalists, Palma Trily [Tib: Pema Thinley], TAR executive vice chairman said that 30 people had been sentenced on 29 April 2008 for their involvement in the 14 March Lhasa riot. They were convicted of “arson, robbery, disrupting public order and assaulting government offices, among other crimes”. Meanwhile, another 116 suspects were on trial [12 people were convicted on 19 and 20 June], “but no death penalty had been handed down”; “It would be decided under Chinese laws whether some would be sentenced to death”.
[Note: considering that the press conference occurred on 19 June 2008, it is not clear why Xinhua published this report online on 11/07/08.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 11 July 2008)

  Wednesday, 18 June 2008
  Qinghai Province » Kyegudo TAP (Chin: Yushu) » Nangchen county (Chin: Nangqian)

During morning, Tibetan residents of Nangchen county conducted a religious ceremony, burned incense, and then tried to carry out a peaceful protest; immediately stopped by local Chinese authorities; no details of arrests.
That night, the Chinese flag on rooftop of county government office was replaced with the Tibetan flag; many pro-independence posters were pasted throughout the county. Consequently, the Chinese authorities closed down private schools, including the schools of monks and nuns, located in the county.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2009)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Khando, a 25-year-old girl staged a peaceful protest at around 5pm despite wind and rain; shouted slogans: “Tibet is an independent country” and “long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”; she was severely beaten and arrested by the PSB [location of protest not provided].
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

Palden Nyima, a 27-year-old from Karze [Kardze] county, was severely beaten and arrested for staging a peaceful protest; the number of protesters is unknown [location of protest not provided].
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

At around 2-3pm, more than ten local Tibetans demonstrated, led by an unidentified layman of Shillidha village. They were reportedly beaten and arrested by Chinese armed forces.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 July 2008)

Six independence protests took place in Ganze [Kardze] county on 18 June.
(reported by The Times, 07 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Passang Dolma, a 32-year-old woman from Yartoe Lamna village in Karze [Kardze] county, carried out a pro-independence protest in front of the county government office. Before leaving her home, she “kept a message that ‘our parents had passed away hopefully waiting for all these years for the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and to get independence for Tibet and freedom to Tibetans. I too have promised them to contribute something in realising their hope. So, I have no regret even if my life meets its end in doing so’”.
Passang Dolma was badly beaten and arrested by the PAP during her protest.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

Two nuns from Gewa Drak nunnery in Karze [Kardze] county peacefully protested at the county government office; severely beaten and arrested by the PSB:

  1. Shitso, aged 26.
  2. Dhungtso, aged 20 (approximately).
    (reported by CTA, 20 June 2008)

Three monks from Beri monastery in Karze [Kardze] county were immediately arrested by the PSB when they staged a peaceful protest in front of the county government office.

  1. Lobsang Gelek, a chant master.
  2. Thang-nye, a former chant master.
  3. Lobsang Palden.
    (reported by CTA, 24 June 2008)

Protest in front of county PSB office at around 11am by Ngawang Phuntsok (aged 32), from the Ngangpa Taktsang family in Bhulshar area of Karze [Kardze] county. Carried Dalai Lama portrait, distributed leaflets, shouted slogans: “Chinese authorities must not denounce the Dalai Lama”, “Bring human rights in Tibet”, “Dalai Lama should be invited to Tibet”. Ngawang Phuntsok was severely beaten and arrested by the PAP.
Just over an hour later, three nuns from Yarteng nunnery – Yangzom (aged 31), Pewang (Pemo) (aged 27), and Lhamo (29) – staged a peaceful protest, shouted slogans: “Dalai Lama should be invited to Tibet”, “Bring human rights in Tibet”, “Tibet belongs to Tibetans”, “Release Lobsang Tenzin Yeshi Thinley Rinpoche” (the founder of Pangri-Na and Yarteng nunneries, who was arrested on 18 May).
[Note: CTA does not state the location of the three nuns’ protest, but it is assumed to have taken place in Kardze county town; CTA does not state whether or not the nuns were arrested for their protest.]
(reported by CTA, 04 July 2009)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

A gunshot was fired in Drepung monastery; the PAP opened fire in the air to warn the monks from protesting.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

Protests “seem to have occurred” in Drepung monastery on 18 June (the 15th day of the 4th month of the Tibetan lunar calendar; considered to be the most holy day of the year); PAP personnel reportedly fired warning shots.
(reported by tibetcustom.com, 21 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Lhasa will soon re-open to foreign tourists “very soon”; the date is to be announced after the Tibet leg of the Olympic torch relay on 21 June. It is not known whether other parts of Tibet would be re-opened to foreign travellers at the same time. The Olympic torch relay was scaled down from a planned three-day event in Lhasa to one day after the devastating 12 May earthquake in Sichuan Province.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 18 June 2008)

Travel agents in Lhasa say thousands of people have booked into Lhasa hotels for the Olympic torch relay and thousands of armed police patrolling the streets ahead of the rally. Restrictions on Tibetans in Lhasa very intense; Tibetans forced to stay home [instead of participating in annual Saga Dawa religious activities]. Tibetans [officials] reportedly threatened with the loss of their jobs and even pensions if they performed [religious] offerings during the torch relay.
Detailed routes of the torch relay not published; major routes to the Potala Palace reportedly to be blocked for the rally, as well as all shops. Chinese authorities are tightly controlling who will be allowed to watch the torch relay; most of the Tibetans selected hold some kind of leadership position; arrangements made for people from all work units and schools to show their support; onlookers would be require to cheer the torch’s progress by shouting “Go China!”
(reported by RFA, 18 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

On the night of 18 June, the PAP arrested 12 monks from Sera monastery.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Nagchu county (Chin: Naqu)

Four monks of Tarmo monastery, Driru county, on their way to Lhasa “for some monastery works” were arrested “when they reached the Nagchu prefecture” [presumably when they reached Nagchu town, the capital of Nagchu Prefecture] by local PSB. They were accused of not seeking permission to leave the monastery. It is not known where they are being detained.

  1. Ngawang Gyalten, aged 42; abbot and head of the Democratic Management Committee of Tarmo monastery.
  2. Ngawang Jampa, aged 40; one of the monastery heads.
  3. Ngawang Sangye, aged 38.
  4. Kalsang Lochok, aged 20.
    (reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)
  Tuesday, 17 June 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The first large religious festival is being held in Lhasa three months after the riot on 14 March. The month-long Sakadwa [Tib: Saga Dawa] festival, the anniversary of the Buddha’s birth, enlightenment and death, began on 4 June and has attracted many residents onto the streets to pray. Hundreds of people hurried to Lhasa from other provinces including Sichuan, Gansu and Qianghai to join the prayers’ march, with their family members and pets. Prayers began at 3am in the moonlight and followed three major routes all circling the Jokhang Lamasery [Tib: Jokhang temple]. The “lamaseries” [monasteries] have all opened to the public. Beggars sit along the major routes waiting for kind givers, which is an original tradition of the festival.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 17 June 2008)

  Monday, 16 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chuwal monastery, Tserima, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Chuwal monastery in Tserima township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. The monks were thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: Following the 16 March protests in Machu, the “Chinese local authority… divided a staff of 119 local Chinese and Tibetan officials, including police and [PSB] members, into groups and sent them to all monasteries in the Machu area” to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. The following monasteries were included: Washang, Nyinthag, Thuten Nyangdi lang, Tashi Chephal lang, Mayu Samten Chekor lang, Tsantak, Shilshu (Shashil), Tserima, and Chuwal [see database entries for each monastery for township location details]. The majority of monks in these monasteries were believed to have been involved in the protests in March, except monks from Washang and Shilshu (Shashil) monasteries.
The monks were expected to attend three ‘patriotic re-education’ classes per week, each class lasting two hours. There are “worsening reactions from the monks and local Tibetan people”, as they are continually forced to denounce the Dalai Lama; many monks have left their monasteries.
Machu county has faced tightened security controls since 16 March, where more than one thousand soldiers and armed police have been stationed; local Tibetans have not been allowed to walk or travel from one village to another by motorbike.
The local Chinese authority “put the monks in their prayer halls” when foreign journalists were due to visit this area, “so that in some instances monks did not even realise the journalists had come to their monastery”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Nyinthag monastery, Nyura, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Nyinthag monastery in Nyura township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. The monks were thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Shilshu (Shashil) monastery, Manma, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Shilshu (Shashil) monastery in Manma township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. However, Washang monastery’s monks were not thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See also Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Tsandak monastery, Manna, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Tsantak monastery in Manma township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. The monks were thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Tserima monastery, Tserima, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Tserima monastery in Tserima township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. The monks were thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Washang monastery, Nyima, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Date unspecified [some time between 16 March and 30 June 2008]: officials were sent to Washang monastery in Nyima township to “carry out a patriotic re-education campaign”. However, Washang monastery’s monks were not thought to have been involved in the protests in Machu during March.
[See also Machu county, 16 June 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dado township, Draggo (Ch: Luhuo) county

Three people from unit number 1 in Guda Nyakdrog village, Dado township, protested at the township government office; distributed leaflets, shouted slogans: “Tibet is an independent country”, “Long live the Dalai Lama”; fled to the mountains to avoid arrest.
(reported by CTA, 07 August 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dhado, Draggo (Chin: Luhuo) county

A group of Tibetans from Dhado township shouted slogans while distributing pro-independence leaflets [it is assumed the demonstration took place in Dhado]; they avoided arrest by feeling to “the mountain”.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Mid June: It was assumed that some Lhasa residents found to be communicating with relatives or friends abroad had also been receiving money from them, and were reportedly made to pay 20,000 yuan each to the authorities.
(reported by sources to TibetInfoNet, 16 June 2008)

The Chinese government abruptly postponed the date of the arrival of the Olympic torch in Lhasa; refused to present a reason or to detail the timing of the route.
The situation in Lhasa is “anything but normal”. The authorities continue to fear that Tibetans may try to stage further protests, and Tibetans continue to fear that they can be arrested at any time for any reason.
Several thousand additional troops are to be deployed this week.
(reported by HRW, 16 June 2008)

  Sunday, 15 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni Xian)

Two monks from Tashi Choekhor Ling monastery in Dho-khor township, Chone county, sentenced in a trial that “devoid of transparency and fairness”:

  1. Tenzin, sentenced to 15 years for being one of the leaders of the March protests.
  2. Tenzin Gyatso, sentenced to 13 years for replacing the Chinese flag with the Tibetan flag at a school in Dho-khor township.

Lekshey (a monk), Tenzin, Woeser (a monk), and five others currently detained in Chone county are to be sentenced soon.
Some of the Tibetans arrested on 17 March in Chone county were each fined 200 yuan and released.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » [Kanlho TAP]

The Kanlho TAP People’s Middle Court announced its ruling on three Tibetans arrested on 11 April for their participation “in the peaceful protests of March in Machu county”:

  1. Lama Kyab: sentenced to 15 years.
  2. Khechok, aged 30: sentenced to 13 years
  3. Konchok, aged 16: sentenced to 12 years.
    (reported by TSC, 21 July 2008)
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Three people arrested on 11 April by Machu county PSB for allegedly participating in a protest held in Machu county in March were given arbitrary prison sentences by the People’s Intermediate Court of Kanlho TAP:

  1. Kelbar, aged 20, from Drolkyab Tsang family in the upper division of Noorma village, Machu county; sentenced to 15 years.
  2. Kheychok Trimthak, aged 30, from Rongchok Tsang family; sentenced to 13 years.
  3. Kunchok, aged 16, from the lower division of Noorma village, Machu county; sentenced to 12 years.
    (reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Circa mid June: “Few days back” [a few days before 18 June], telephone lines of some households in Karze [Kardze] county were disconnected.
(reported by CTA, 20 June 2008)

An unidentified Tibetan carried out a protest in Karze [Kardze] county. Details not available.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Three Tibetans from Rakha village in Dhado township, Karze [Kardze] county, staged a peaceful protest in front of the county PSB office:

  1. Sonam Wangyal, aged 31.
  2. Dorjee Lorig, aged 23.
  3. Rinchen Dhondup, aged 24.

One of them held a portrait of the Dalai Lama on his head during the protest; shouted slogans: “His Holiness the Dalai Lama and His Serenity the Panchen Lama are most precious to us”, “Chinese authorities have compelled His Holiness the Dalai Lama to leave the country, and imprisoned His Serenity the Panchen Lama”, “His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be welcomed to Tibet”, “release all the political prisoners including His Serenity the Panchen Lama”, “Independence for Tibet”, and “China quit Tibet”.
The three protesters were severely beaten and arrested by the PSB and PAP; their whereabouts unknown; “Both of them are relatives” [presumably all three are related].
(reported by CTA, 23 June 2008)

Peaceful protest outside the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Saturday, 14 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Jampa Tashi (aged 24) from Tsangkha village in Kardze county was severely beaten when he shouted slogans at the county government office and then arrested by the PAP.
(reported by CTA, 01 August 2008)

Yeshi Palden, aged 27, from Khangmar (Gaeden Samdupling) monastery in Karze [Kardze] county, staged a peaceful protest in front of the county PSB office; shouted slogans: “release all the political prisoners”, “His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be welcomed to Tibet” and “long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. Yeshi Palden was severely beaten with metal batons and arrested by the PSB.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Friday, 13 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chone Gonchen Ganden Shedrubling monastery, Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni xian)

Date unspecified, circa 13 June 2008: Monks in a monastery near Zhuoni [Tib: Chone; presumed to be Chone monastery] shooed boys in maroon robes away before agreeing to talk to a journalist. The eleven-year-old boys were suspected of involvement in the uprising and detained for three days; relatives paid a fine of 3,000 yuan each to release them. Families also paid fines of 5,000 yuan (US$725) or more to free monks after 10 days to two months in detention. The amount is more than the average annual income in Gannan prefecture. A monk detained for 10 days said he had been “terrified”; his family sold a yak to pay for his release. Many families have borrowed money to pay for their relatives’ release.
(reported by Reuters, 13 June 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » [Kanlho TAP]

Armed paramilitary units guard access to monasteries; at checks along roads leading to monasteries, they ask if drivers are Han Chinese and check cars before allowing them through. Monks struggle to pay fines for their alleged involvement in protests. Work teams have moved in to supervise study sessions that are supposed to break monks’ allegiance to the Dalai Lama. Monks say the teams are likely to stay until after the Olympic Games; the monks have to master texts on “patriotic education” in order to pass a patriotic test, possibly in September, to be allowed to remain as monks. It is not clear how widely the tests are being enforced. Textbooks, in Chinese and Tibetan, cover Chinese law, including laws of autonomous regions, and chapters condemning Tibetan independence and the Dalai Lama. A textbook titled “propaganda material”, has chapters on “What happened during unrest in our prefecture” and “The history of how Tibet became part of China”.
(reported by Reuters, 13 June 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Thewo county (Chin: Diebu xian)

Date unspecified, circa 13 June 2008: An elderly monk at a tiny, remote monastery in Diebu [Tib: Thewo] county told a Reuters journalist, “The work team from the county seat tells us monks should only read scripture, don’t get involved with politics”
(reported by Reuters, 13 June 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Tsoe monastery, Tsoe (Khanlo Dzong; Chin: Gannan/Hezuo/ Hezuoshen), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

Date unspecified, circa 13 June 2008: PAP personnel in camouflage and helmets blocked entry to [Tsoe] monastery; the dirt streets of the monastery appeared bare of the usual traffic of monks and pilgrims.
(reported by Reuters, 13 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dawu (Tawu) county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Tsewang Rigzin from Chishar village in Barzing township, Tawu [Dawu] county, and another unidentified person from Pangna village in Tawu [Dawu] county were arrested by the county PSB on 13 June for allegedly taking part in and photographing “the protest” [CTA 29/0708 does not state the date or location of the protest, but it is assumed to be the protest which occurred in Dawu county on 5 April].
(reported by CTA, 29 July 2008)

  Thursday, 12 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

A Tibetan man named Palden Wangyal, aged 20, protested in Kardze town centre, tying a white prayer scarf round his head and holding the Tibetan flag; he walked two kilometres (1.2 miles) before being detained by police.
(reported by RFA, 12 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Se monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

On 11 and 12 June, PAP and others” continued to harass the monks who have been on 3-year retreat; restricted the monks of minor age from living in the monastery.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Recently the Labor and Social Security Office of the TAR issued an initial 1.19 million yuan (US$172,963; EUR€110,679; UK£87,647) in unemployment relief for those who were left temporarily unemployed after the " 3.14 Tibet riots". Only city residents are eligible to receive unemployment benefits; the first batch of unemployment assistance is targeted to five state-owned tourism enterprises [therefore, not to Tibetan-owned businesses]; compensation is for those who worked in hotels, tourism agencies, and restaurants, to guarantee their basic livelihood during the temporary unemployment period. Those with unemployment insurance will receive up to 480 yuan (US$70; EUR€45; UK£35) per month; those without unemployment insurance will received 420 yuan (US$61; EUR€39; UK£31) per month. It is expected that the relief will be provided for one year in Lhasa city and six months in other counties and cities in Tibet.
(reported by People's Daily Online, 12 June 2008)

Date unspecified: The Labour and Social Security Office of the TAR “recently” issued an initial 1.19 million yuan in unemployment relief for city residents left temporarily unemployed after the “3.14 Tibet riots”. The first batch of unemployment assistance is targeted at “five state-owned tourism enterprises”; compensation provided to those who used to work in hotels, tourism agencies, and restaurants; “In accordance with regulations, those who have unemployment insurance will receive up to 480 yuan per month. However, other victims who do not have unemployment insurance will also get 420 yuan per person per month according to Tibet’s unemployment relief standards”. It is expected that the relief will be provided for one year in Lhasa city and six months in other counties and cities in Tibet.
(reported by People's Daily, 12 June 2008)

  Wednesday, 11 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Two brothers, Lobsang, aged 20, and Dorje, aged 30, protested at around 2pm; shouted slogans and distributed leaflets calling for the return the Dalai Lama, religious freedom, equality of minority/nationality rights, and “Tibet for Tibetans”. Dorje was shot in the foot and both were arrested by PAP.
(reported by TSC, 21 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Four or five Tibetans demonstrated at the main intersection in Kardze town at around 10 am. The protesters were Namsel Lhamo, aged 30 (female), from Raka village; Tenzin Thargyal, 32 (male); a man whose name is not known. A boy and a monk from Lhoba village “protested on the same day” [although it is unclear if all five people participated in the same protest]. All five protesters were beaten and detained by police. Local officials then raided Namsel Lhamo’s home; “took away” photographs of the Dalai Lama and “smashed them on the floor”. Namsel Lhamo’s brother, Pema Gyatso, aged 30, then “drew his sword”; the officials fled; soon after, around 200 PSP personnel were dispatched to arrest him; meanwhile he had escaped to the mountains. Chinese officials were subsequently “giving a hard time” to family members, including the elderly parents and young children.
(reported by RFA, 12 June 2008)

Palden Wangyal, aged 20, was severely beaten and arrested by the PAP for staging a peaceful protest while flying the Tibetan flag in front of the county government office.
A layperson and a monk from southern Karze [Kardze] were also beaten and arrested by the PAP for carrying out a peaceful protest in front of the county government office.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

A peaceful protest occurred at around 11am at the county government office; slogans included “His Holiness the Dalai Lama must be immediately welcomed back to Tibet”, “Freedom for Tibet”, “Release all the political prisoners”, and “China quit Tibet”. According to some of CTA’s sources, there were five protesters who were all arrested; CTA confirmed that three Tibetans from Rakha village, Dado township, Karze [Kardze] county, were severely beaten and arrested by the PAP:

  1. Namsey Lhamo (female; aged 30).
  2. Tenzin Dhargye (male; aged 32).
  3. Unidentified monk.

Namsey Lhamo’s brother attempted to help her while she was being arrested; PAP later arrived at the brother’s home to arrest him but he fled.
(reported by CTA, 12 June 2008)

At around 11am, a peaceful protest was staged by a few Tibetan residents of Kardze county at one of the road intersections at the main market square in Kardze town; raised pro-Tibet slogans; distributed pamphlets calling for the “swift return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet”, “freedom in Tibet”, the “release of those arrested in recent protests” and “China, quit Tibet”. Shortly after the brief protest, at least three Tibetans were rounded up by county PSB officials and severely beaten before being taken away to the county detention centre; their current condition is unknown. Those detained are:

  1. Namsey Lhamo, aged 30; mother of two children; a farmer from Raga village, Dando township, Kardze county.
  2. Tenzin Dargyal, aged 32; father of an infant; a farmer from Kardze county.
  3. A monk whose identity has not been ascertained.
    (reported by TCHRD, 11 June 2008)

Lobsang (aged 20; born in Chokri village, Drakgo [Draggo] county) and his brother, Dorjee (aged 30; from Tsaklek village in Karze [Kardze] county) staged a peaceful protest while distributing leaflets at the [Kardze] county government office at around 2pm; shouted slogans such as “Tibet belongs to Tibetans”, “the Dalai Lama must be invited to Tibet”.
They were soon “suppressed” by the PAP, “resulting in a gun shot at Dorjee’s foot”; both were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2007)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Se monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Following the appearance of pro-independence posters pasted at the roadside near Se monastery and a Tibetan flag [see Se monastery, 9 June 2008; CTA 21/06/08], the PAP surrounded Se monastery and heightened its restrictions; a thorough raid was also conducted in the monastery; many monks fled the monastery.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

On 11 and 12 June, PAP and others” continued to harass the monks who have been on 3-year retreat; restricted the monks of minor age from living in the monastery.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Yunnan Province » Dechen TAP (Chin: Deqin) » Gyalthang (Chin: Zhongdian), Gyalthang (Chin: Zhongdian) county

Olympic torch relay through “Shangri-la” [Tib: Gyalthang]; several residents [not stated whether or not Tibetan] said “thousands of troops” were brought into the area; paramilitary police lined the streets, some kept watch atop buildings; others posted at intervals on a rural road which formed part of the relay route.
At a monastery on the outskirts of town [understood to be Sumtseling monastery], police had ordered the monks to stay in their compound; some were made to attend a “sutra reading session” that lasted from 7am until 3pm.
(reported by Reuters, 11 June 2008)

  Tuesday, 10 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Two monks were arrested by the PAP for staging a peaceful protest on 10 June at the county government office.
In another incident, a woman was arrested by the county PSB for her alleged involvement in sharing information with the outside world through phone calls [it is unclear whether or not this arrest also occurred on 10 June].
(reported by CTA, 12 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Se monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

A “huge contingent of PAP and others” arrived at Se monastery and arrested a group of monks; raided the monastery and confiscated Dalai Lama photos and portraits.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Monday, 09 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Nuns who had been arrested and beaten on 8 June but not released that night were finally turned over to their families, who were waiting at the police station, during the morning of 9 June. They had been badly injured; many had “long wounds or holes on their legs”, while others were unable to speak due to their injuries; some had to be supported to enable them to walk, and two nuns were taken out of Drango [Draggo] county for emergency treatment.
The nuns and their families were subsequently kept under surveillance by police.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

One of the three monks who staged a peaceful protest on 6 May reportedly died on 9 June. The monk is believed to be Tsewang Drakpa; was severely beaten and arrested on 6 May and later admitted to hospital.
(reported by Tibetan Solidarity Committee, 09 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Four monks from Khangmar (Khanang) monastery in Karze [Kardze] county carried out a peaceful protest while flying the Tibetan flag and scattering leaflets in front of county government office. They were severely beaten and arrested by the Public Security Burean (PSB).

  1. Jamgha Phuntsok, aged 18.
  2. Yeshi Dorjee, 32.
  3. Jampa Dorjee, 18.
  4. Solu.
    (reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Pa, Kardze (Ch: Ganzi) county

On or around 9 June: The PSB arrested Yangchen Khando from Pa village in Karze [Kardze] county for “allegedly sharing information about the protests being held in Karze county”.
(reported by CTA, 25 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Se monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Many pro-independence posters were found pasted at the roadside near Se monastery; a Tibetan flag was also found hoisted there [see also Se monastery, 11 June 2008; CTA 21/06/08]
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Sunday, 08 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Around 9am, Tsering Tso, a 27-year-old nun from Badak Samtenling [Samtenling/ Samten Ling/Watak] nunnery, nunnery scattered flyers and shouted slogans (“Invite the Dalai Lama to Tibet” and “Free Tibet”) in front of the Drango [Draggo] monastery shop. She continued the protest for “less than 30 minutes”, until two police came to arrest her, “soon followed by several additional police who came to help”.
At about 5pm, the nuns of Badak Samtenling Nunnery (approximately 300 nuns) marched “into” Drango town to protest in solidarity with Tsering Tso. Various sources confirm that as they arrived at Gochad Thang plain [?] “near” Drango town [hence the previous comment that they marched “into” the town states their intention, but not what actually happened], the nuns were stopped and beaten “with sharp metal implements” by “many armed personnel”. The nuns were taken in three canvas-covered trucks to Drango county jail, Drango town.
At around 9pm, nearly 500 lay Tibetans gathered in front of Drango county police station to demand the nuns’ release and denounce the government for arresting them. Most of the nuns were released that night, except for those who had been badly injured.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

At around 9am, a Tibetan nun named Tsering Tsomo staged a peaceful, solo protest in Draggo county; raised pro-Tibet slogans; distributed pamphlets calling for the “swift return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet” and “freedom in Tibet”. Tsering Tsomo, originally from Chakra village, Draggo county, is a 27-year-old nun from Samtenling (a.k.a. Watak) nunnery. During her protest, Tsering Tsomo was surrounded by security forces, and was “severely beaten and tortured”, pounded with iron rods, kicked and punched indiscriminately. She was detained by county PSB officials and held at the county Detention Centre for questioning.
In response, at around 5pm more than two hundred nuns of Samtenling nunnery staged a peaceful demonstration calling for the release of Tsering Tsomo; headed towards Draggo county headquarters; en route they were stopped at a place known as Gogaythang by security forces. The nuns were kicked and punched indiscriminately, and attacked with electric prods and iron rods. Ten protesters were seriously injured; taken to a nearby hospital for treatment; “scores” were detained and taken away in waiting military trucks to the county detention centre. Relatives of those injured and hospitalised were prohibited from meeting their loved ones. No further information available on the condition of those injured and detained.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 June 2008)

Tsering Tsomo, aged 28, from Samten Ling nunnery, was detained while handing out leaflets in Draggo county, calling for the return of the Dalai Lama. Later that day, more than 300 nuns from Samten Ling nunnery marched on county offices, demanding the release of Tsering Tsomo. All were detained and many were beaten.
(reported by RFA, 12 June 2008)

At around 9am, a nun named Tsering Tso(mo) from Samtenling (a.k.a. Watag) nunnery in Tehor, staged a lone protest in Draggo county; distributed leaflets calling for the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet; unknown whether or not she had shouted slogans; she was arrested and beaten.
At around 5pm, all other nuns from Samtenling nunnery went on a procession in solidarity with Tsering Tso(mo) towards Draggo county [government headquarters] but were stopped by security forces at a place called Go-geythang; the nuns were beaten; some of them reportedly sustained injuries caused by stabbing; some were hospitalised; others were detained.
Around five to six hundred local Tibetans later assembled to request that the authorities release the detained nuns, warning of possible widespread protests; picketed until 9pm. Some of the nuns were released; families of the detained nuns were seen carrying them home by hauling them on their [the relatives’] backs due to the nuns’ severe injuries. Among the injured were two nuns with broken ribs; many others were “virtually speechless”. Those with serious injuries have been taken to Chengdu for treatment.
(reported by Tibetan Solidarity Committee, 09 June 2008)

At around 9am at the county government office, Tsering Tso (Tsering Tsomo), a 27-year-old nun from Samten Ling (Watak) nunnery, distributed pamphlets calling for the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet. She was beaten and arrested by PAP personnel.
In response to the arrest of Tsering Tso, all the nuns from her nunnery “left for Drakgo [Draggo] county [presumably the county town] in order to carry out peaceful procession at around 5pm”.
When they were nearing the county [presumably the county town], the nuns were stopped in the Gogey Thang area by PAP personnel. Some nuns were beaten so severely that they had to be hospitalised at the county hospital; some were “taken away on the pretext of treating them in a Chengdu hospital”.
That night, local people protested; demanded the release of the detained nuns.
(reported by CTA, 11 June 2008)

  Saturday, 07 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Since 7 June, monks prohibited from leaving Labrang monastery after 9pm without permission from their Democratic Management Committee.
Sixty paramilitary personnel have been permanently stationed in the monastery and are manning six new checkpoints which have been built surrounding the monastery since 10 March. Paramilitary personal have “forcibly taken all desk phones from monks’ rooms” [?] and “cut off all phone lines in monks’ flats [quarters] in the monastery except in lamas’ residence” [note: this report provides an obviously exaggerated impression of the number of landline telephones in Labrang Tashikhyil monastery].
During ‘patriotic re-education’ meeting [date unspecified], the local police department announced that: “All monks…should not contact abroad or accept phone calls from abroad. Monks who go against this rule will be fined a minimum of [15,000 yuan]. Rumours spread from outside cause instability to the minds of monks and the monks’ community”.
A “new patriotic re-education campaign was brought into the monastery” on 7 June; small brochures of 7-8 pages were given to the monks, containing the “new campaign’s regulations”, consisting of the following 6 points:

  1. Be aware of the Communist constitution.
  2. Welcome the Olympic torch relay in Tibet.
  3. Do not listen to rumours from abroad.
  4. Be aware of the rules of religious freedom.
  5. Denounce the separatists.
  6. Practise patriotic re-education in the monastery.

The monks were ordered to memorise these points and then recite them to the “patriotic re-education campaigners”. Only those who passed the recitation exams would be allowed to resume their daily religious routine in the monastery.
Travel from Labrang monastery to adjacent areas, including the 70km route to Tsoe [Chin: Gannan – the prefecture capital] has been “tightened”; new checkpoints manned with armed police and traffic police set up to “search all passengers’ bags”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Friday, 06 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Three monks held a peaceful protest in Drango [Draggo] county, calling for a free Tibet and for the Dalai Lama to be invited to Tibet.
They were reportedly [arrested and] severely tortured; one of them, Tsewang Dakpa, received multiple critical injuries and is believed to have died on 8 June. The other two monks were hospitalised but were not allowed any visitors.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

Three monks from different monasteries in Draggo county staged a peaceful protest outside the county government headquarters, calling for Tibetan freedom and the return of the Dalai Lama. The monks were indiscriminately “beaten with electric prod”, kicked and punched by the Chinese security forces; the monks were critically injured and taken to Draggo county hospital for urgent medical treatment.

  1. Tsewang Dakpa, aged 22; from Jangtha township, Draggo county, Kardze TAP.
  2. Thupten Gyatso, (age unknown); from Tawu county, Kardze TAP.
  3. Jangsem Nyima, aged 22; from Dzatoe county, Jyekundo (Ch: Yushu/Jiegu) TAP, Qinghai Province.

Tsewang Dakpa reportedly sustained severe, multiple injuries; believed to have only a slight chance of survival; unconfirmed rumours have spread of his death. Thupten Gyatso and Jangsem Nyima are believed to be in a critical condition and moved to another hospital.

(reported by TCHRD, 09 June 2008)

Three monks were severely beaten and arrested by PAP personnel for distributing pamphlets, shouting slogans and waving the banned Tibetan flag at 12:22 pm. When the first monk was arrested, the second monk began to protest; when he was arrested, the third monk began to protest.

  1. Tsewang Drakpa, a monk from Drakgo [Draggo] county, Karze [Kardze] TAP. Tsewang Drakpa was reportedly severely injured; some sources report that he has died.
  2. Thupten Gyatso, a monk from Tawu county, Karze [Kardze] TAP.
  3. Jangsem Nyima, a monk from Zatoe county, Kyegudo TAP, Qinghai Province.
    (reported by CTA, 11 June 2008)
  Thursday, 05 June 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Most of the Tibetans arrested in Machu [whether town or county as a whole is not specified] since March “have now been” released in return for large sums of money, with the exception of those thought to have initiated the protests on 16 March [and presumably 17 March]. Those still detained include Sangta (Sangay Tashi), a nomad from Nyima township in Machu county, arrested on 19 March for waving a Tibetan flag and shouting slogans in Machu town on 16 March.
[Note: the significance of the date, 5 June 2008, is not stated; it is presumably a date when some of those detained were released, or when this information reached Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Three youths riding motorcycles waved the Tibetan national flag in the middle market of Draggo county [town]; shouted pro-independence slogans; scattered “anti-China” leaflets; they escaped from the scene.
(reported by Tibetan Solidarity Committee, 09 June 2008)

Some youths protested in Drakgo [Draggo] county while riding motorcycles and waving the Tibetan flag.
(reported by CTA, 11 June 2008)

  Wednesday, 04 June 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Additional armed police were deployed to the streets of Lhasa, according to a local official, as Buddhist pilgrims flocked to the city for Saga Dawa, a traditional month-long religious festival which this year commences on 4 June (which also happens to be the 19th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre). The government spokesman told AFP that “the deployment of armed police was increased because of the coming of a religious festival and as a response to some threat remarks made by Tibetan separatists recently”. Therefore, “we certainly have to increase police deployment […] to ensure people’s safety at the festival”.
(reported by AFP, 04 June 2008)

  Tuesday, 03 June 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The Chinese government acknowledged the possibility of further unspecified “incidents” in Lhasa.
(reported by HRW, 16 June 2008)

The Chinese government permitted a trip to Lhasa for foreign correspondents on 3-5 June [the third of three such media trips in 2008]. Chinese residents gave [some of?] the correspondents accounts of police shooting protesters in Lhasa.
(reported by HRW, 16 June 2008)

On 24 May, 2 and 3 June, “some Tibetan people expressed their frustration at those Tibetans (shop owners and street vendors) for resuming their businesses as reported earlier”. [Note: CTA does not state how this frustration was expressed.]
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

Date unclear: “Later” [after some Tibetans expressed frustration at Tibetan shop owners and street vendors on 3 June, for resuming their businesses] many posters were seen pasted at Barkhor Square and other areas, stating that people should neither visit the sacred shrines nor open up their shops, as this would allow the Chinese government to show the outside world that stability has been restored. Tibetans in Lhasa are neither visiting the sacred shrines nor circumambulating the Potala Palace and surrounding temples (the lingkhor) and continue to remain in their homes.
The possibility of further protests has led the authorities to tighten restrictions.
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

Second day of visit by thirty-one reporters from 18 media organisations in Taiwan (2), Hong Kong (15) and Macao (1).
Tuesday morning: visit to the “Lugu residents community”. Drakpa Yonten, director of the residents’ committee, said: “People live a peaceful life here now and they can worship Buddhas in monasteries”, noting the Jokhang Monastery [Tib: Jokhang temple] has “already been opened”. The Lugu area used to be a slum, “housing one third of the beggars in Lhasa”; now “85 percent of the residents are Tibetans and most run their own businesses”; residents donated 45,000 yuan for the 12 May “quake-hit regions” [Sichuan province].
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 03 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Ngari Prefecture (Chin: Ali) » Tashigang, Gergye (Chin: Geji) county

Circa 3 June 2008: Chinese helicopters are flying over the Ngari area on an almost daily basis; convoys of military trucks are on display in the main towns of the prefecture. Local Tibetans see these activities as “a show of force meant to threaten and intimidate them”. Tibetans in the area ordered to send one member from each family to serve in the local Chinese militia. Those conscripted are being trained at Tashi Gang [Tashigang] in Ngari; forced to wear uniforms issued by the Chinese. Police have warned Tibetans not to provide information about the local situation to outsiders, or face severe punishment.
(reported by a source to RFA, 03 June 2008)

  Monday, 02 June 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Gyalrong Tsodun Kirti monastery, Barkham (Chin: Ma'erkang) county

A contingent of PAP personnel arrived at Gyalrong Tsodun Kirti monastery in Barkham county and hoisted a Chinese flag on the monastery. The monks “secretly destroyed the flag with its pole the next night” [unclear if 2 or 3 June].
Consequently, restrictions heightened; no one allowed to leave or enter the monastery campus; additional PAP personnel deployed; monks interrogated to find out who committed the “serious crime” of destroying the Chinese flag. The monastery is reported to be in a critical situation.
(reported by CTA, 21 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Thirty-one reporters from 18 media organisations in Taiwan (2), Hong Kong (15) and Macao (1) arrived for “coverage of Tibet”; the “second batch of reporters invited to Tibet after the 14 March Lhasa riots”. Three-day visit to Lhasa and Shannan [(Tib: Lhoka) prefecture], Tibet University, companies engaged in handicraft art, Potala Palace and Norbu-Linkag [Tib: Norbulingka]. Reporters will have “extensive contact with officials, monks and common people” and be “able to interview shop owners whose shops were damaged during the riot”. A TAR government official said the trip will “provide open news coverage without any restriction”. Yang Liu, Oriental Daily (Hong Kong) reporter, had visited Tibet six times; met friends Monday evening, “he said normal life in Lhasa has resumed”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 03 June 2008)

On 24 May, 2 and 3 June, “some Tibetan people expressed their frustration at those Tibetans (shop owners and street vendors) for resuming their businesses as reported earlier”. [Note: CTA does not state how this frustration was expressed.]
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Sunday, 01 June 2008
  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Date unspecified: Rebgong [Rebkong] county’s annual summer festival which was to be held in June was cancelled “to show solidarity with, and gratitude to, those Tibetans who have suffered the brutal crackdown of the Chinese government” in recent months, and to show sympathy for the victims of the Sichuan earthquake in May.
Rebgong [Rebkong] county is being tightly guarded by the Chinese authorities.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Date unspecified: Two Tibetans, Tashi Dorje from Lagang teng village and Thupten Phuntsok from Phukyul Nang village, Karze county, were arrested by the Chinese security people in June on charges of staging a demonstration. It is believed that “there were few [a few] other Tibetans” [involved in the protest] but their details are yet to be confirmed.
(reported by TSC, 21 July 2008)

Date unspecified: In June, Tashi Dorjee (aged 19) from Gangteng village, Karze [Kardze] county and Thupten Phuntsok from Phukyul Nang village, Karze [Kardze] county, were arrested by the PSB after peacefully protesting. It is reported that the protest included other Tibetans whose details are yet to be confirmed.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

“Since” 1 June, Kirti monastery’s monks began leaving, unable “to bear the severe restrictions imposed on the monastery by Chinese authorities”. Since 20 March, the monks at Kirti have been forced to undergo ‘patriotic re-education’ in eight groups; they are made to provide their signatures or thumbprints in opposition to the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA), the exile Tibetan community, and particularly the Dalai Lama. The Chinese flag is flown on the monastery rooftop. Unable to bear this repression, all the monks stopped participating in the ‘patriotic re-education’ “since” 1 June. “From the evening of June 2 till the morning of next day” all the monks have fled the monastery, with the exception of a few senior monks aged over 70 years of age.
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Ghardo township, Markham (Chin: Mangkang) county

Date unspecified: In June, Gyurmey Wangdak from Guytsok nomad [area] in Ghardo township, Markham county, carried out a peaceful protest at the township government office calling for Tibet’s independence and wishing the Dalai Lama a long life. After the protest he was arrested by the Chinese authorities and the PSB; detained at the county detention centre; later taken “towards Chamdo” [apparently along with Soegyal; see Ghardo township, 15 May 2008; CTA, 29/0708]; current wellbeing unknown.
(reported by CTA, 29 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Armed police were re-deployed in Lhasa.
(reported by HRW, 16 June 2008)

“Since” 1 June, Chinese authorities have tightened restrictions in Lhasa with the deployment of an “additional strong contingent” of PAP personnel. People of the surrounding counties are prohibited from travelling to Lhasa by their respective authorities.
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhoka Prefecture (Chin: Shannan) » Zangri county (Chin: Sangri)

Date unspecified: all county officials ordered to attend patriotic education classes several times a week until after the Olympic Games.
(reported by RFA, 18 June 2008)

  Saturday, 31 May 2008
  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Machen (Chin: Maqin/Dawu), Machen county (Chin: Maqin Xian)

Circa 31 May 2008: Drolmakyi, the Tibet folk singer arrested on 30 March was permitted to return home in late May after nearly two months in custody; a condition of the release was reportedly that Drolmakyi cannot appear in public or discuss her arrest. [See also entry for LA Times, 30 March 2008]
(reported by LA Times, 08 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

The ‘patriotic education’ campaign has been vigorously enforced in Tibetan areas and monasteries in the Draggo area during the past few days. On 31 May, the Chinese authorities convened a meeting in a town close to Chogri monastery, Draggo county; Tibetans forced to denounce the Dalai Lama; many poor Tibetans were offered large sums of money to condemn the Dalai Lama and oppose Tibetan independence. Those who refused were threatened with expulsion from the area; told that all the land belongs to China; anyone refusing to comply with the patriotic education told they were “free to go to India or any other place”. Some poor families complied, but 90 percent of those present refused to sign criticisms of the Dalai Lama, even under threat of confiscation of their land and homes.
(reported by sources to RFA, 03 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Jampa Dekyi, a 20-year-old girl from Jokhang Nangkha Gon-tsang family, Thingka township, shouted pro-independence slogans at Karze county government office at about 12:00pm. PSB and PAP personnel immediately appeared; she was severely beaten and bled profusely from her head, before being taken away.
(reported by CTA, 04 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Se monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Date unspecified: Following their participation in a protest staged by local people and themselves on 16 March, the monks of Se monastery were placed under severe restrictions which restricted their movements and prevented them from organising gatherings. Therefore, [despite these restrictions] the monks left; the monastery remained empty at the end of May.
(reported by CTA, 31 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: Ngawang Palsang (a.k.a. Lama of Lo monastery), who had been arrested in March, died in May from a heart attached caused by torture he suffered in prison. His body was handed over to his family.
[See also: Lhasa, 31 March 2008; CTA, 02/07/08]
The death toll now stands at 211 [note: CTA’s death toll relates to the date when information was received about each death, not when each death occurred].
(reported by CTA, 02 July 2008)

Date unspecified: some of the 14 march Lhasa protesters who were released from detention in early May were re-arrested at the end of the month. Some of them “are being released by forcing them to furnish information of those involved in the Lhasa protests. Some are even given monetary incentives for this purpose. Through this way, Chinese authorities still continue to arrest people involved in the protest”.
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Date unspecified: Namlang, a man aged around 42 years from Dzong Shol village, was badly beaten during the March protests in Phenpo Lhundrup county; hospitalised in the county hospital; his health did not improve; he died in May.
Namlang is survived by his wife, two children aged 8 and 15, and a grandmother aged 82.
(reported by CTA, 10 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Gyalsho Bekar monastery, Bekar township, Driru (Chin: Biru) county

Date unspecified:
Three monks from Gyalsho Bhenkar [Gyalsho Bekar] monastery and six laypeople from Bhenkar [Bekar] township were “given nine years of sentences” in May [it is not clear whether each of them was sentenced to nine years, or if nine years was the combined total]; these nine people along with two monks sentenced in March (Drakpa Gyaltsen and Naymay) were all “imposed sentences at different times”.
The three monks are:

  1. Bhuchung Norwa.
  2. Bhu Tengay.
  3. Tsokchok.

The six laypeople are:

  1. Lhakpa Tashi.
  2. Dorjee.
  3. Lhakpa.
  4. Kyayou.
  5. Zumril.
  6. Woetro.
    (reported by CTA, 15 July 2008)
  Friday, 30 May 2008
  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Alak Khaso Rinpoche from Rongpo monastery is in a critical condition after being severely beaten when PSB officers cracked down on a peaceful protest staged by laypeople and monks on 17 April. He was being treated at a hospital in Siling (Chin: Xining) Municipality. His leg was broken and he suffered lung injuries; his vision and hearing have also been affected. Rongpo monastery was tense as monks rejected patriotic re-education, and seven others remained in detention. Due to this, there was a possibility of more protests.
(reported by CTA, 31 May 2008)

  Wednesday, 28 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

At approximately 10am, a 21-year woman named Rinchen Lhamo, from the Tapon-tsang family, “situated near Tachu Bridge”, staged a peaceful protest and waved the Tibetan flag [it is unclear whether “near Tachu Bridge” refers to Rinchen Lhamo’s home or the location of her protest]. Rinchen Lhamo handed out flyers with slogans such as “Tibet is an independent country”, “The Dalai Lama must be welcomed back to Tibet”, and “China quit Tibet”. She was severely beaten at the protest site and then arrested by county PSB officers. Local people at the scene confronted the PSB, but were ignored. Locals also reported hearing gunshots near the protest scene.
(reported by CTA, 29 May 2008)

At around 9am, three nuns from Draggar nunnery in Serchu Teng township protested at the county government offices, shouted slogans: “The Dalai Lama must be welcomed back to Tibet” and “Long live the Dalai Lama”. All three were arrested:

  1. Sangye Lhamo.
  2. Tsewang Khado.
  3. Yeshi Lhadon.
    (reported by CTA, 31 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

At around 9am, three nuns from Dragkar nunnery, Kardze county, staged a peaceful demonstration in Kardze county town’s main market square; they distributed pamphlets calling for Tibetan independence and chanted slogans calling for the “swift return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet”, the “Immediate release of all political prisoners”, as well as “Long Live the Dalai Lama” and “Freedom for Tibet”. The short demonstration was ended when they were arrested and taken by PSB officials for questioning. The nuns are Ven Sangye Lhamo, aged 26, from the Kyakyatengtsang family of Dungra village, Serchuteng township, Kardze county; Ven Tsewang Kando, aged 38, from Dungra village, Serchuteng township, Kardze County; and Ven Yeshi Lhadon, aged 24, from Tsozhi village, Kardze county. Their present condition and well-being is unknown.
About one hour after the nuns’ demonstration, a 21-year-old female student named Rigden Lhamo of the Tapontsang family from Lhakey village, Thingkha township, Kardze county, staged a solo protest; she unfurled the Tibetan national flag and shouted similar slogans at the county government headquarters. The county security forces reportedly fired gunshots; Rigden Lhamo was then detained and beaten severely by PSB officials; one eyewitness was unsure whether or not Rigden Lhamo had been shot or injured; another eyewitness reported seeing bloodstains on her body, but it could not be ascertained whether it was from bullet wounds or the beating. TCHRD reported that it was “confirmed that she has sustained an injury”, but that there is no information on her current whereabouts.
The current situation in Kardze is known to be very tense; the authorities are deploying more security forces to the area to suppress further political dissent.
(reported by TCHRD, 29 May 2008)

  Tuesday, 27 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Some of the laypeople and monks arrested around 22 and 23 March from Machu county were “recently” released [note the report is dated 12/06/08] after being heavily fined; the health of a few of them has deteriorated due to severe torture.
Lodoe Wangpo (a.k.a. Shidae Gyatso), who was arrested and detained on 17 April from Lanzhou, was released on 27 May “after paying many thousands of [yuan]”. He is no longer allowed to manage the school which he had established [see Lanzhou, 17 April 2008; CTA 12/06/08].
(reported by CTA, 12 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dawu town (Chin: Daofu), Dawu county (Chin: Daofu xian)

RFA does not specify Tawu town or Tawu county: Tibetan residents of Tawu own some 500 trucks, 200 of which have been parked in Tawu blocking Chinese-owned trucks. Residents said they “weren’t sure why but suspected the park-in amounted to a protest against Chinese rule”.
(reported by RFA, 27 May 2008)

  Monday, 26 May 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Lanzhou, Gansu Province

It was reported that Lodoe Wangpo, arrested on 14 April 2008, was released and allowed to return home [to Machu county rather than Lanzhou, where he had been staying at the time of his arrest; earlier he had moved from Machu to Lanzhou “following pressure by the authorities” in Machu county; details and date were not provided]. He had not been physically tortured during his detention and was “healthy following his release”. His belongings, confiscated and searched by the “State Security Bureau”, were returned to him following his release. He was warned not to leave Machu county.
[See also Lanzhou, 14 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Ramoche temple, Lhasa

Three monks from Ramoche temple were detained for allegedly sharing information with outsiders via telephone calls. They are:

  1. Bhuchung.
  2. Damdul.
  3. (The third is unnamed but was reportedly born in Maldrogongkar).

They had previously been arrested along with other Ramoche monks on 7 April, but were released after 17 days, along with all but five monks.
Subsequently, attempts to re-arrest the three monks failed due to the support expressed by other monks and the officials’ fear of sparking strong protests. On 26 May they were “arrested quickly” before other monks could show their support.
(reported by CTA, 31 May 2008)

  Saturday, 24 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Khenleb sub-district, Serthar (Ch: Seda) county

Sungkyab, resident of Tse-shey village, Khenleb sub-district, Serthar county, was arrested by Nyitoe sub-district PSB personnel. He had been injured during the protest held on 20 March in the Nyichu area. Sungkyab’s wife, Drukpo (aged around 30 years; a resident of Thoeshel village), was also arrested.
(reported by CTA, 02 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Paltsel Kyab (a.k.a. Shikalo), a 58-year-old resident of the Nak-tsangma area of Ngaba county, was arrested on or around 24 April by county PSB officers, allegedly for involvement in a protest in Ngaba county in March. He reportedly died after “severe torture” in Ngaba county prison.
(reported by CTA, 29 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gonsar monastery, Markham (Chin: Mangkang) county

Chinese authorities detained five monks from Gonsar monastery in connection with “a series of small blasts during massive anti-Chinese protests in late March” [RFA’s report contains contradictions; having stated that the explosions occurred in late March, RFA then adds that the explosions “are said to have occurred April 6-7”]. No casualties were reported and “nobody knows” who was responsible; however, the authorities linked the explosions to “the patriotic campaign” launched “around the time of widespread anti-Chinese protests from mid-March”.
The five detained monks are:

  1. Gonpo, aged 20.
  2. Choedrub, 25.
  3. Palden, 30.
  4. Ngawang Phuntsok, 17.
  5. Kunga, 20.
    (reported by RFA, 29 May 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Afternoon: Three Tibetan youths who opposed the opening of Tibetan businesses during the current period of repression of Tibetans, “had a short argument” with some of the Tibetan street vendors and shop owners at Tromsik-khang [Tromsigkhang] market. The three youths then shouted pro-independence slogans. PSB, PAP, “and other personnel”, both in uniform and civilian dress, appeared at the scene “to crackdown on the peaceful protest”, resulting in a fight between the youths and the Chinese forces; people near the scene had dispersed; a gunshot or explosion was heard. All the shops near Barkhor square were immediately closed; PAP tightened security checks “on every passer-by”.
(reported by CTA, 03 June 2008)

  Friday, 23 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Two nuns from Dhargye Hardu nunnery demonstrated outside the county government offices; shouted slogans: “Freedom for Tibet”, “The Dalai Lama must be welcomed back to Tibet” and “Long live the Dalai Lama”. They were severely beaten and then arrested by county PSB and PAP officers. The nuns are:

  1. Jampa.
  2. Rigzin Wangdon.
    (reported by CTA, 26 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Two nuns of Dargay Hardu nunnery staged a peaceful protest at the Kardze county government headquarters; chanted slogans: “Swift return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet”, “Long Live the Dalai Lama”, “Freedom for Tibet” and “Immediate release of all political prisoners”. PSB personnel arrested the two nuns, Ven Jampa Lhamo, aged 30 from Sadul village, Kardze county and Ven Rinzin Wangdon aged 23 from Lharinyan village, Kardze county. They were reportedly “severely beaten and manhandled” by the PSB personnel at the site of the demonstration before being taken to Kardze county PSB detention centre for questioning. No information available on their current condition.
(reported by TCHRD, 26 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

At 9am, county PSB personnel arrested two monks, Lobsang Dorjee and Kunga, for “showing disrespect to the ‘patriotic re-education’ being imposed on the monastery”.
(reported by CTA, 02 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

On 24 May, 2 and 3 June, “some Tibetan people expressed their frustration at those Tibetans (shop owners and street vendors) for resuming their businesses as reported earlier”. [Note: CTA does not state how this frustration was expressed.]
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Thursday, 22 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

At approximately 6pm, four nuns from Nyima Gesey nunnery distributed posters [or leaflets] and shouted slogans outside the county government office, including “Freedom for Tibet”, “All the political prisoners must be released immediately” and “Long live the Dalai Lama”. County PSB and PAP officers immediately arrived and arrested the nuns. They are:

  1. Tengha.
  2. Rinchen, from the Jama-tsang family.
  3. Jamgha Dolma.
  4. Pema.

    (reported by CTA, 26 May 2008)

Ugyen Tashi, an 18-year-old monk from Tse-tsang monastery, staged a peaceful protest in Karze county carrying a large Dalai Lama portrait. Ugyen Tashi was immediately arrested by PSB personnel.
(reported by CTA, 04 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

At around 6pm, four Tibetan nuns of Nyimo Gaysey nunnery in Tehor, Kardze county had staged a peaceful protest at the county government headquarters against the recent crackdown of peaceful Tibetan protesters and the illegal detention of Tibetan people in the Chinese prisons. The nuns distributed pamphlets calling for Tibetan independence, “raised their fists” and shouted slogans: “Long Live the Dalai Lama”, “The Dalai Lama to return to Tibet”, “Independence for Tibet” and “Release all political prisoners”. Moments after the protest [began?], local PSB personnel immediately arrested the four nuns. The detained nuns were identified as Bhumo Tengha from Lunang village, Kardze county and Rinchen Jamatsang, Jamgha Dolma and Pema from Lhopa township, Kardze county. According to TCHRD, “The detained nuns were later subjected to severe beatings and torture by the Chinese security forces”, while “There has been no information about the nuns’ current whereabouts and well being”.
(reported by TCHRD, 26 May 2008)

  Tuesday, 20 May 2008
  Qinghai Province » Siling Municipality (Chin: Xining Shi) » Siling (Chin: Xining)

Chinese authorities have released on bail a leading Tibetan media personality – writer, television producer, and performer – Jamyang Kyi. Relatives reportedly paid 5,000 yuan in bail; her family has urged friends to avoid phoning their home; Jamyang Kyi expects to stand trial on unspecified charges related to massive “anti-Chinese” protests in March. [See also entry for RFA, 1 April 2008]
(reported by RFA, 20 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Buruna nunnery, Kardze county

Nuns at Buruna nunnery were told to criticise the Dalai Lama and their rinpoche, Buruna Rinpoche [detained two days earlier; see Kardze county, 18 May 2008; RFA, 21/05/08]. The nuns refused; 52 of them went to Kardze town in two groups and protested. They called for the long life of the Dalai Lama and distributing protest leaflets; all 52 were detained.
Security forces surrounded Buruna nunnery, placing it under virtual siege. “Security police” raided the nunnery and for the rest of the day, 21 nuns were restrained inside the nunnery with tied hands; their hands were later untied but they were prevented from leaving the nunnery. [RFA stated that Buruna nunnery is usually home to 89 nuns but did not report on the whereabouts of the other 16 nuns on 20 May; the incident was apparently reported on 20 May 2008 by a nun who had not taken part in the protest.]
A local PSB official, contacted by telephone, commented only that “Several separatists were detained […] according to the law of the country”. Residents of a home for the elderly tried to appeal for the nuns’ release but police prevented them from entering Kardze town centre.
(reported by RFA, 21 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dragyab, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

At 1am, three nuns from Nya-gye nunnery in Dargye township began a march to Kandze town, and walked about 20km before dawn. At around 9am they protested in the town; shouted slogans: “Long live the Dalai Lama”, “Invite the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet”, “We Tibetans want freedom”, “Release all the arrested Tibetans”.
The three nuns were arrested by PAP.

  1. Achoe, from Rimda village, Kandze [Kardze] county.
  2. Sonam Choekyi, from Lamna village, Kandze [Kardze] county.
  3. Taga, from Nodkhab village, Kandze [Kardze] county
    (reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

During the morning, some nuns from Nyagey nunnery were arrested for protesting at the county offices.
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

Two Tse-tsang monastery monks named Loyang and Tenzin Ngodup staged a peaceful protest at the county government offices; shouted slogans including “Freedom for Tibetans”, “The Dalai Lama must be welcomed back”, and “Long live the Dalai Lama”.
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Following demonstrations by 52 nuns of Baruna nunner[see Buruna nunnery, 20 May 2008; RFA, 21/05/08], no one was allowed in Kardze town; all shops were ordered closed and the town was full of security forces.
(reported by RFA, 21 May 2008)

Two monks in their early twenties from Tehor Tsitsang monastery staged a peaceful protest outside the Kardze county government headquarters; chanted slogans: “Dalai Lama return to Tibet”, “Long Live the Dalai Lama”, and “Immediate Release all political prisoners including Trulku Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche” (a prominent religious figure arrested on 18 May from his residence for unknown reasons; his whereabouts unknown). The two monks, Loyang from Tsaklab village, Lhopa township, Kardze and Tenzin Ngodup from Pharingtsang, Kardze, were immediately arrested by PSB personnel and taken in a police vehicle to Kardze county PSB detention centre for questioning. No information available on their condition.
(reported by TCHRD, 22 May 2008)

At around 1am on 20 May, in order to avoid restrictions of movement, three nuns from Nyagay nunnery began walking from Tehor Nyagay nunnery (located close to Tehor Dargay monastery) towards Kardze county – a distance of around 20 kilometres – for a demonstration. The nuns were Achoe from Rida village, Kardze county; Soe Choekyi from Lamna village, Kardze county; and Taga (Tashi Yangtso) from Noekab village, Kardze county. The nuns reportedly reached Kardze county town before dawn and began their protest at around 9am near Kardze county headquarters; they shouted slogans (“Freedom in Tibet”, “Dalai Lama should return to Tibet” and “Immediate release of the political prisoners imprisoned by the Chinese authorities”) and were immediately detained by the county security forces; their whereabouts is unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 21 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Jokhang temple

Date unconfirmed; circa 20 May: an unidentified Tibetan girl was shot dead outside the southern gate of the Tsuklakhang [Jokhang] temple at around 12 noon.
The girl, who is believed to have come from a village in Lhokha, was attempting to visit her brother, a monk at the Jokhang. The girl argued with PAP personnel who are surrounding the temple and who denied her permission to visit; during the argument she was shot dead from behind by a PAP officer using a gun with a silencer. A witness reported that the girl bled from her chest after she fell. Witnesses were dispersed from the scene at gunpoint.
(reported by tibetcustom.com, 16 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Circa 20 May: An unidentified Tibetan girl, who came from a village reportedly in Lhokha, arrived at the southern gate of the Tsuklakhang [Jokhang] temple to visit her brother, a monk; she was denied entry by PAP personnel who are guarding the temple, resulting in an argument. An armed policeman then shot her from behind (the gun used to shoot her was fitted with a silencer) at about 12 noon. She reportedly fled, bled from her chest, and died on the spot. People [bystanders] were dispersed from the scene at gunpoint; the corpse was later taken away by the PAP.
(reported by CTA, 16 June 2008)

  Monday, 19 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dragyab, Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) county

Phurbu Rinpoche, a famous “incarnation lama” [tulku] from Trehor Kandze monastery, was arrested at his house in Dragyab village, outside Kandze [Kardze] town, at around 4.30am. Phurpu Rinpoche is the “root incarnation lama” [not root lama; he is the spiritual head] of two nunneries: Pangrina [Pangri Na] nunnery and Yatsak (Yarti) nunnery; he also runs two medicine shops and has built an elderly care centre.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Tibetans arrested in Kandze [Kardze county]:

Name Gender Village County
Dorje Gyalten Male Tharmey Kandze
Tsashi Wanggyal Male Tharmey Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Dingri Shelkar Choedhe monastery, Tingri county (Chin: Dingri Xian)

A Chinese ‘work team’ visited Shelkar Choedhe monastery on 19 May 2008 to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’, resulting in a “bitter and heated argument” between the monks and the ‘work team’. Ven Khenrab Tharchin, a member of the monastery’s so-called Democratic Management Committee (DMC), stood up during a ‘political re-education session’, which he opposed, stating that he could not denounce the Dalai Lama as required under the campaign. Eleven monks stood up in support of Ven Khenrab Tharchin and in opposition to the ‘re-education’ campaign. After the incident, the monastery was closed to all visitors, the monks were forbidden from leaving and their mobile phones were confiscated to prevent news of the incident from spreading; the monks were threatened with “dire consequences” if found leaking information to the outside world. That night, “scores” of PAP and PSB personnel conducted a raid on the monastery, arresting twelve monks:

  1. Ven Khenrab Tharchin, 32, Drushe village, Shelkar township,
  2. Ven Tsewang Tenzin, Phelbar village, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  3. Ven Tenzin Gayphel, Lingshar village, Gaymar townsip, Dingri county
  4. Ven Khenrab Tashi, Mashak village, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  5. Ven Topgyal, Drushe village, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  6. Ven Tenzin Tsering, Bichu village, Gyatso township, Dingri county
  7. Ven Lobsang Jigme, Norgay nomadic area, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  8. Ven Khenrab Nyima, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  9. Ven Dhondup, Che village, Tsakhor township, Dingri county
  10. Ven Tenpa, Lolo Langga, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  11. Ven Samten, Shollingshar, Shelkar township, Dingri county
  12. Ven Choedhen, Shollingshar, Shelkar township, Dingri county

Several days after their arrest, relatives enquired with the local PSB officers as to the monks’ whereabouts and requested permission to visit them; the relatives were then intimidated with a “stern warning” for “damaging the image of the government” and requested the identity of the person who informed them of the monks’ detention.
(reported by TCHRD, 31 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Shelkar Choede monastery, Dingri (Chin: Dingri) county

Twelve monks were arrested by county PSB at Shelkar Choede monastery, for refusing ‘patriotic re-education’:

  1. Khenrab Tharchin, a member of the monastery’s Democratic Management Committee.
  2. Choewang Tenzin.
  3. Tenzin Gephel.
  4. Khenrab Tashi.
  5. Topgyal.
  6. Tenzin Tsering.
  7. Lobsang Jigme.
  8. Khenrab Nyima.
  9. Tashi.
  10. Tenpa.
  11. Samten.
  12. Choeden.

Among those arrested monks, four are being held at Dingri county detention centre; eight were taken away to Shigatse Prefecture [presumably Shigatse, the prefectural capital].
At Shelkar Choede monastery, monks’ quarters were raided, mobile phones were confiscated. Strict restrictions are being imposed; monks are prohibited from leaving the monastery campus and visitors are being prevented from entering the monastery.
Another member of the monastery’s Democratic Management Committee, Lobsang Jinpa, was later arrested “for having links with those monk arrestees in refusing the so-called patriotic re-education” [date of arrest not provided]. Lobsang Jinpa had been in Lhasa during March and was subsequently arrested for his alleged involvement in the Lhasa protests; he had been detained until the beginning of May.
(reported by CTA, 02 June 2008)

  Sunday, 18 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Tulku Phurbu Tsering (commonly known as Buruna Rinpoche; founder of Buruna and Lhatseg nunneries) was detained at 4pm after rejecting Chinese ‘patriotic education’ by refusing to condemn the Dalai Lama.
[see also Buruna nunnery, 20 May 2008; RFA, 21/05/08.]
(reported by RFA, 21 May 2008)

Tibetans arrested in Kandze [Kardze county]:

Name Village County
Champa Dorje Monk Angsang Kandze
Palden Trinley Monk Angsang Kandze
Kunga Trinley Monk Serchuteng Kandze
Tse-og Monk Dzapa Kandze
Jamyang Tsering Monk Dzapa Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Pangri-Na nunnery, Sib-ngo township, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi xian)

At approximately 4pm, Trulku Phurbu Tsering and Khado, the head and deputy head of Pangri-Na (Trehor) nunnery, were arrested by PSB officers. Trulku Phurbu Tsering, is also responsible for the functioning of Pangri-Na and Ya-tsek or Yarti nunneries. He is a popular and highly revered monk who established a home for the poor and the old, two medical stores and worked for the welfare of local people. His arrest caused great concern.
Two laypeople, one of them named Jampa Dorjee, were also arrested in the same area.
(reported by CTA, 19 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tehor Kardze monastery, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

At around 4.30am on 18 May 2008, security forces arrested Tulku Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche from his residence without stating any reason; his whereabouts is unknown. He is the chief spiritual preceptor and the head of Pang-ri and Ya-tseg nunneries in Kardze; he had constructed an “old age orphanage” (sic) and opened two chemist shops for the local Tibetans. As a highly revered religious figure in Kardze county, and therefore viewed by the Chinese authorities as a direct challenge to their authority, the arrest of Tulku Phurbu Tsering Rinpoche has brought “much grief and disbelief to the local Tibetans”.
(reported by TCHRD, 19 May 2008)

  Saturday, 17 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Tibetans arrested in Kandze [Kardze county]:

Name Gender Village County
Thubten Male Tharmey Kandze
Lunglung Soname Male Tharmey Kandze
Yeshi Jigmey Male Tharmey Kandze
Choephel Male Tharmey Kandze
Jo-nga Female Tharmey Kandze
Pema Yangchen Female Tharmey Kandze
- Female (described as “a girl”) Gechung Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Friday, 16 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Phuwu village, Nyitoe sub-district, Serthar (Ch: Seda) county

On or around 16 May, Rigdhak, Menkyab and Ghoeso were arrested for their participation in a protest in Phuwu village, under Nyitoe sub-district, on 18 March. Their names had subsequently been included among the list of wanted ‘rioters’.
(reported by CTA, 02 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Jokhang temple

The Jokhang temple reopened on 16 May, state-run media reported, two months after a violent uprising in Tibetan areas throughout China.
Phone calls to the temple went unanswered Saturday morning (17 May 2008).
(reported by AP, 17 May 2008)

The Jokhang temple in Lhasa, closed to public since the 14 March violence, re-opened to Buddhist believers and tourists on 16 May; “Buddhists queued up to make pilgrimage before the statue of Sakyamuni and tourists took photos against the background of the temple complex”. In half a day, the temple received “more than 400 Buddhist believers and some 40 tourists organised in three groups”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 16 May 2008)

  Thursday, 15 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Xiahe [Tib: Labrang] and the surrounding region is not formally under martial law, “but that’s what it amounts to”; foreigners have been mostly kept away; New York Times journalist travelling in Gansu and Qinghai provinces eluded troops by taking a local car with curtains pulled over the windows. “Although there was some rioting here in Xiahe, and some attacks on the police and burning of police vehicles elsewhere, most of the demonstrators were peaceful. But even where protests were entirely peaceful, the repression has been merciless”.
At Labrang monastery, more than 220 Buddhist monks were arrested [date unspecified] and beaten according to local Tibetans; the majority have been released but some are still hospitalised; others are hiding in the mountains. A monk who was released after one night of imprisonment, said “I was beaten for two hours with sticks, and kicked all over”.
(reported by New York Times, 15 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Following demonstrations by nuns of Pang-ri nunnery on 14 May, during which more than 55 of them were arrested, the Chinese authorities have imposed strict restrictions on daily movements of nuns and monks. Since 15 May 2008, shops and groceries remain closed and freedom of movements restricted in Kardze County.
Tibetan monks and nuns requiring medical treatment must procure special permission from the “higher Chinese authorities” [TCHRD does not specify which level] and they must have a member of government staff as a guarantor to escort them. Failure to follow these instructions could lead to arrest.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 May 2008)

The Chinese government has been filming every evening for the last few days with a cast of PAP officials at the old airport (known as Mara-thang) near Kardze monastery. Scenes being filmed include Tibetan protestors engaging in violent acts such as attacking PSB and PAP personnel, who are then in self-defence forced to resort to violence including opening fire on Tibetan protesters. CTA believes the film may be used for propaganda purposes to deceive the international community.
(reported by CTA, 15 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

At around 5pm, more than 70 nuns from Pangrina [Pangri Na] nunnery entered [Kardze] town in two groups from two directions – the Shuriling and Degonpo areas. Shouting slogans (“Long live the Dalai Lama”, “We Tibetans want freedom and independence”, and “The Dalai Lama should be returned to Tibet”) and scattering flyers, the two groups joined together at the intersection near the town bridge; they crossed the bridge en route to the police station but “police and armed police arrived” and began beating the nuns. Around 50 nuns were arrested on the spot and were “put in a police vehicle together”. The nuns continued to shout slogans and scatter flyers from the moving vehicle. Witness reported seeing “blood dripping to the ground, with robes and shoes dropped from the nuns left lying on the ground”.
Prior to this event there were 87 nuns in the nunnery; after the protest only 16-20 nuns remained. Reportedly “approximately 50 of these nuns” [i.e. the fifty arrested during the protest] were taken to Dartsedo county.
[Note: Tibet Watch does not account for the seemingly ‘missing’ 17-21 nuns, but having stated that “around 50” were arrested, the names of specifically 54 nuns “arrested in this incident” were provided.]

Name Age Village Township County
1 Sonam Lhatso 34 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
2 Yangchen Khadro 38 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
3 Sangwang 39 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
4 Tsewangtso 38 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
5 Giling 34 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
6 Chumey Lhamo 19 Phuyinang Karak Kandze
7 Tselu 34 Phuyinang Karak Kandze
8 Yangchen 33 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
9 Norbu Dolma 42 Su-ngo Su-ngo Kandze
10 Phuntsok 33 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
11 Sonam Paldhon 34 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
12 Sonam Choedhon 36 Lhopa Lhopa Kandze
13 Chamdhon 31 Phuyinang Lhopa Kandze
14 Khaga 32 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
15 Alo Chimey 30 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
16 Sonam Dekyi 30 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
17 Lobsang Lhamo 28 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze
18 Namkha Choetso 27 Shenyen Lhopa Kandze
19 Jam Lhayang 23 Lhopa Lhopa Kandze
20 Soku 24 Gunkha - Kandze
21 Lobsang Yangtso 30 Sarse - Kandze
22 Tashi Lhawang 37 Sarse - Kandze
23 Dorje Khadro 30 Lagangteng Lhopa Kandze
24 Bang Tsega 27 Sarse Lhopa Kandze
25 Lhaga 26 Tsaklek Lhopa Kandze
26 Omtso 26 Lagangteng Lhopa Kandze
27 Lhaga 33 Golubuk Lhopa Kandze
28 Palkyi 23 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
29 Tashi Dolma 30 Tongkornang Tongkor Kandze
30 Dhonga 21 Phuyinang Lhopa Kandze
31 Soga 23 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
32 Riga 20 Shiling Lhopa Kandze
33 Pema Yangtso 33 Shenyen Lhopa Kandze
34 Choepa Sonam 28 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
35 Rigzin Choetso 23 Phuyinang Lhopa Kandze
36 Phun-ga 30 Sertok Lhopa Kandze
37 Sonam Choedhon 22 Dru-nga Su-ngo Kandze
38 Yudhon 27 Phuyinang Lhopa Kandze
39 Choelha 40 Drewo - Drak-go
40 Tsomo 33 Drewo - Drak-go
41 Yeshetso 20 Drewo - Drak-go
42 Tsuldhon 25 Drewo - Drak-go
43 Sonam Yangtso 26 Drewo - Drak-go
44 Nyima Lhamo 31 Drewo - Drak-go
45 Pejung 31 Drewo - Drak-go
46 Rinyang 21 Drewo - Drak-go
47 Yudhon Lhamo 18 Tongkor Tongkor Kandze
48 Palden Lhatso 35 Tongkor Tongkor Kandze
49 Konchok 28 Lhopa Thingkha Kandze
50 Chuyang 23 Lhopa Thingkha Kandze
51 Wangchen Lhamo 20 Tongkor Tongkor Kandze
52 Yangchen 40 Tsalek Lhopa Kandze
53 Bumo 36 Phuyinang Lhopa Kandze
54 Bumo 36 Gechung Su-ngo Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch; an additional name was listed, citing TCHRD: Chime Dolma. Aged 32, from “Tonkor”.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

Dorjee Tashi, an 18-year-old male from Se-ngo township, Karze [Kardze] county, shouted slogans against the Chinese authorities at the county government office. He was arrested immediately by PSB personnel.
(reported by CTA, 04 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Ghardo township, Markham (Chin: Mangkang) county

Soegyal from Guytsok nomad [area] in Ghardo township, Markham county, shouted slogans at the township government office. After the protest he was arrested by the Chinese authorities and the PSB; detained at the county detention centre; later taken to “towards Chamdo” [apparently along with Gyurmey Wangdak; see Ghardo township, 1 June 2008; CTA, 29/0708]; current wellbeing unknown.
(reported by CTA, 29 July 2008)

  Wednesday, 14 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Nuns from Ganden Choeling nunnery protested against the Chinese authorities at 9 am [TCHRD reported the number of participants as both “scores of nuns” and a “few nuns”]. During their demonstration, the nuns marched towards Kardze county government headquarters; as they were about to cross the Kardze bridge, about 300 PSB and PAP personnel arrived and blocked their way. Three nuns – Dorjee Khando, Takdon and Pema Lhamo – breached the security and protested and shouted slogans upon reaching the county government building. They were arrested within minutes and beaten severely by the security forces. Their whereabouts is unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 May 2008)

Four nuns from Gaden Choeling nunnery were arrested after protesting outside the county government offices at approximately 4pm local time:

  1. Yeshi Choetso (a.k.a. Yigha), aged 36.
  2. Gyalgha Lhamo, aged 54.
  3. Deyang, aged 31.
  4. Choetso, aged 25.
    (reported by CTA, 17 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

2pm, six nuns from Gaden Choeling nunnery began a protest; slogans included “Long live the Dalai Lama”. When they were beaten by armed police, a lay Tibetan man
joined in to try to fight off the policemen. All seven people were arrested.

Name Village Township County
Dorje Khadol Nun Chumkha Damdo Kandze
Champa Lhadhon Nun Drakdong Serkham Kandze
Pema Lhamo Nun Drakhar Serkham Kandze
Choetso Nun Damdo Damdo Kandze
Gyal-ho Nun Angsang Damdo Kandze
Yeshi Choetso Nun Dzoshu Damdo Kandze
Serga Layman Gonpashab Kardze Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

Fifty-four nuns were arrested on 14 May [not 52 as reported by FTC on 15/05/08; FTC also revised the spelling of the nunnery, from Pungrina to Pangrina].
Work teams of local government officials had been implementing ‘patriotic re-education’ sessions at Pangrina Tashi Gephel Ling nunnery since March; nuns ordered to denounce the Dalai Lama and sign a document vilifying the Dalai Lama as a ‘separatist’. The nuns decided unanimously that they would rather die than denounce the Dalai Lama; held a secret meeting at which it was decided they would stage a peaceful protest against the Chinese government.
At around 5pm on 14 May, the nuns entered Kardze town in two groups from different directions – from the Shurilung area and the Degonpo area. They scattered flyers, shouted slogans: “Long Live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”, “The Dalai Lama must return to Tibet” and “We want freedom”. As they approached the police station they were beaten; 54 arrested, bundled into a police van; they continued to shout slogans and scatter flyers as they were driven away. Blood seen on the street and some of the nuns’ robes and shoes left lying on the ground.
The whereabouts of a further 19 nuns who took part in the protest remains unknown.
(reported by FTC, 19 May 2008)

At around 5pm, approximately 76 nuns from Pungrina nunnery (located 4 km from Kardze town) protested on the street linking Kardze monastery and the county police station; shouted slogans: “Long Live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”, “We want freedom”. Fifty-two nuns were arrested by the police.
There are usually 87 nuns resident at Pungrina nunnery; following the protests and arrests there were only 16 nuns remaining in the nunnery; the whereabouts of 19 nuns who took part in the protest remains unknown.
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

Over 60 nuns from Pangri-Na nunnery, in Sib-ngo township, Kardze county, staged a peaceful protest at approximately 5pm at the county government offices; 52 nuns were arrested after being severely beaten by PSB and PAP personnel. Others escaped arrest; their whereabouts not known.
Prior to the protests, there were over 80 nuns in Pangri-Na nunnery; following the arrests, approximately 16 nuns remain; they had been conducting prayer rituals in private households on the day of protests.
After the protest, work teams from the township arrived to “educate” the remaining nuns; however, the officials “had to flee due to strong opposition from the nuns”.
[See also: Dartsedo county, 4 July 2008; CTA 04/07/08.]
(reported by CTA, 15 May 2008)

Six nuns from Gaden Choeling nunnery protested in Kardze town; shouted “Long Live the Dalai Lama”. Police stepped in immediately to stop the protest and beat the nuns; a Tibetan man named Serga from Gonpashab town “charged into the crowd to defend the nuns”; he was arrested along with the six nuns:

  1. Dorje Khadol from Damdo township.
  2. Champa Lhadon from Serkham township.
  3. Pema Lhamo from Serkham township.
  4. Choetso from Damdo township.
  5. Gyal-ho from Damdo township.
  6. Yeshi Choetso from Damdo township.

The Tibetan man was in Khardze county.
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Pang Na Tashi Gepheling nunnery (Pang-ri nunnery), Su-ngo township

Over 55 nuns of Pang-ri nunnery protested against the Chinese authorities (Pang-ri is usually home to around 80 nuns, but around 25 were absent due to religious ceremonies in “other places”). The nuns voiced their resentment against the ongoing ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign in Tibetan nunneries and monasteries, including the killing, torture and arrest of peaceful Tibetan protesters. They resented the Chinese government’s allegations that the Dalai Lama had masterminded protests in Tibet, and they resented the implementation of ‘patriotic re-education’, forcing Tibetans to sign official documents that criticise and denounce the Dalai Lama.
In an “anticipatory move”, the nuns gathered for a meeting where they vowed never to take part in ‘patriotic re-education’ at any cost. They made a proclamation: “It is better to die than to denounce, criticise and attack the Dalai Lama; to sign official documents denouncing the Dalai Lama. If there is no place for us to worship and live, let us go somewhere else or die. If the Chinese authorities kill us, let us be killed; we have no regrets”. Shortly after the end of the meeting, at around 5 pm, the nuns grouped themselves at the Kardze bridge and then marched towards the Kardze county government headquarters, located about two kilometres from Pang-ri nunnery. They chanted slogans including: “Independence for Tibet”, “Long Live the Dalai Lama” and “The Dalai Lama to return to Tibet”.
Approaching the county government building, PSB and PAP personnel immediately arrested more than 55 nuns “on the spot and their torn and fallen robes and clothes were reportedly scattered on roads. No one picked up the nuns’ robes for fear of being arrested by the security forces”. The nuns shouted slogans and threw pamphlets into the air while they were “bundled up and thrown them [sic] into police vehicles and taken into custody within minutes”. TCHRD also remarks that the nuns were “beaten and tortured during the arrest”. The nuns’ current whereabouts and conditions are unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

A 22-year-old monk named Bumgha from Gonjo county in Chamdo prefecture was arrested by PSB officers following a protest in Serthar county. He denied PSB claims that he was resident at Larung Ngarig Nangten Lobling monastery in Serthar county, “but the monastery he belonged to was unknown”.
Additional PAP personnel were reportedly deployed in the county.
(reported by CTA, 17 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Two lay Tibetans were arrested, seemingly in connection with the arrests of monks from Khenpa Lungpa and Woeser monasteries in Garthog township. The are: Dhargye Garwatsang, aged 19, and Kunchok Tenzin, aged 21.
(reported by TCHRD, 15 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Monks and two laypeople affiliated with the Oser and Khenlung monasteries, Markham county, were detained on 14 May. The Oser monastery monks were identified as:

  1. Tenphel, aged 19.
  2. Riyang, 21.
  3. Choegyal, 23.
  4. Lobsang, 19.
  5. Tenzin Tsampa, 19.
    The monastery’s manager, Ngawang Tenzin, was also detained but has since been released.

The Khenlung monastery monks were identified as:

  1. Lobdra, aged 15.
  2. Namgyal, 18.
  3. Butruk, 13.
  4. Jamyang Lodroe, 15.
  5. Tsepak Namgyal, 15.
  6. Kalsang Tashi, 17.
  7. Jamdrub, 21.
  8. Wangchuk, 22.
  9. Penpa Gyaltsen, 26.
  10. Pasang Tashi, 30.
  11. Lhamo Tsang.

The detained laypeople were identified as Dargye Garwatsang, aged 19, and Konchog Tenzin, 21.
[Notes: RFA does not clearly state the allegations against those detained on 14 May, but states that the allegations against five monks detained ten days later, on 24 May, “echoed those [allegations] against monks and two laypeople” who were detained on 14 May. The allegations against those detained on 24 May had been their alleged connection with “a series of small blasts during massive anti-Chinese protests in late March”. RFA’s report contains contradictions; having stated that the explosions occurred in late March, RFA then adds that the explosions “are said to have occurred April 6-7”.]
(reported by RFA, 29 May 2008)

  Tuesday, 13 May 2008
  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

Choyang Gyatso wrote a petition dated 13 May 2008 to county prosecutors, the Rebkong People’s Procuratorate, stating that 23,000 yuan (US $3,352; EUR €2,128; UK £1,680) disappeared from his quarters at Rongwo monastery between 17 and 19 April. Choyang Gyatso accused 20 police officers (15 special policemen and five armed policemen) who searched the premises after he was detained on 17 April. The money included donations by the devotees and families of several monks, including Choyang Gyatso, and from donations and payments for prayer sessions. The money had been saved for use on the monastery, and wrapped in a yellow ceremonial scarf and placed in a red cloth bag, but after Choyang Gyatso’s release on the morning of 19 April, he found the cloth bag was on his bed but the ceremonial scarf and the money had vanished. Other monks are able to testify that the money was being kept in Choyang Gyatso’s room. Choyang Gyatso threatened to sue the government unless authorities investigate. A copy of the letter had been sent to Woeser, the Beijing-based Tibetan writer.
(reported by RFA, 26 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Ten nuns from Drakar nunnery protested peacefully; shouted “Long live the Dalai Lama” and “We Tibetans want freedom of religion and human rights”; they were arrested by PSB and PAP “after the protest”.

Name Age Village Township County
Botsun - Gyalyung Serchuteng Kandze
Trinley - Gyalyung Serchuteng Kandze
Sonam Yangtso - Gyalyung Serchuteng Kandze
Tamdrin Tsekyi 36 Nyoelang Serchuteng Kandze
Lhamo Choekyi 44 Gyalyung Serchuteng Kandze
Dekyi - Serchu Serchuteng Kandze
Bumo Yangkyi 21 Serchu Serchuteng Kandze
Champa Lhamo - Labang Karak Kandze
Trinley/Nyiga - Labang Karak Kandze
Bumo Taga - Shingkhar Karak Kandze
Lobsang Tonpa 20 Bushu Serchuteng Kandze
Palden Tsultrim 19 Serchu Serchu[teng?] Kandze
Lobsang Choeje 19 Lamgong Thingkha Kandze

[Spellings in this table according to Tibet Watch.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

Three Tibetan Buddhist monks from Kardze monastery gathered in Kardze town at around 9.30 to 10 am; they distributed leaflets and shouted for the long life of the Dalai Lama; protested in the presence of Chinese security forces (there are reportedly hundreds of soldiers dressed as ordinary labourers in Kardze town; there is a “huge presence” of armed security forces). The protesting monks were detained by the police. The monks were identified as:

  1. Lobsang Tenpa, aged 20.
  2. Lobsang Choeden, 19.
  3. Palden Tsondru (Tsultrim?), 19.

Five Tibetans from Palden Tsultrim’s hometown, Seshutin Yaratin, have also been detained.
(reported by RFA, 15 May 2008)

Three Trehor monastery monks were arrested for protesting in Kardze town; shouted slogans and scattered flyers calling for a Free Tibet:

  1. Lobsang Thonpa, aged 20, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  2. Palden Tsultrim, aged 19, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  3. Lobsang Choeje, aged 19, from Thingka township, Kardze county.

Their whereabouts unknown.
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

Monks from Kardze monastery protested outside the county headquarters; three monks known to have been arrested are:

  1. Lobsang Choeden.
  2. Palden Tsultrim.
  3. Lobsang Tenpa, aged 20.
    (reported by CTA, 13 May 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Local police arrested five monks, “Chogyal and Tenphel and another three monks from the Wese [Woeser] monastery”, who “allegedly plotted to bomb key county establishments” [the ‘plotting’ was reported to have taken place on 3 April, the actual bombing allegedly on 5 April].
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Woeser monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

The arrival of a Chinese ‘work team’ on 10 May to conduct an intense and rigorous ‘patriotic re-education’ programme resulted in “bitter and heated” arguments between the monks and the Chinese authorities. Monks adamantly refused to sign official documents or write essays denouncing the Dalai Lama, leading to the arrest of six monks at Woeser monastery on 13 May:

  1. Ngawang Tenzin, aged 40 (monastery administrator)
  2. Tenphel, aged 19
  3. Rigyang, aged 21
  4. Choegyal, aged 23
  5. Lobsang Gyatso, aged 19
  6. Tsangpa, aged 17

The remaining monks subsequently left Woeser monastery and “returned to their respective homes in a solemn act of protest”. The closure of the monastery, which usually housed fewer than one hundred monks, has brought “much sadness to the local Tibetan devotees who were unable to come to terms with a sudden closure of sacred monasteries”.
(reported by TCHRD, 15 May 2008)

  Monday, 12 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

A group of nuns from Drakar nunnery protested against the Chinese authorities during the afternoon. Ten nuns were arrested:

  1. Tashi Gha
  2. Thinely
  3. Sonam Yangzom
  4. Tamdin Choekyi
  5. Yangkyi
  6. Lhamo Choekyi
  7. Jampa Lhamo
  8. Dickyi
  9. Nyima
  10. Bhuti
    (reported by TCHRD, 17 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Gaden Choeling nuns protested against the detention of two nuns (Bumo Lhag and Sonam Dekyi, arrested on 23 April); ten nuns arrested:

  1. Botsun, from Serchu township.
  2. Trinley Sonam Yangtso, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  3. Tamdrin Tsekyi, aged 36, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  4. Lhamo Choekyi, aged 44, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  5. Dekyi, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  6. Bumo Yangkyi, aged 21, from Serchu township, Kardze county.
  7. Champa Lhamo, from Karak town, Kardze county.
  8. Trinley from Karak town, Kardze county.
  9. Bumo Taga, from Karak town, Kardze county.

[Note: FTC did not provide a tenth name; however, “Trinley Sonam Yangtso” may actually be two names, missing a coma in FTC’s text. FTC gave the location of the protest as Kardze county; more specifically, it is believed to have occurred in Kardze town.]
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

Fourteen nuns from nunneries in Kardze (Chin: Ganzi) were detained after demonstrating on 11-12 May in the centre of Kardze town, near the local television station. They were protesting against the detention of two nuns from Drakar nunnery (Bumo Lhaga, 32, and Sonam Dekyi, 30) who were detained on 23 April for calling for the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet.
Twelve of the 14 nuns were identified:

  1. Sey Lhamo, aged 36
  2. Thubten Drolma, 40
  3. Ani Taga, 36
  4. Lhawang Chokyi, 41
  5. Yangkyi, 28
  6. Gyayul Seyang
  7. Gyayul Thinley
  8. Gyayul Shachotso Bodze
  9. Tamdin Tsekyi
  10. Seshuktin Tamdin Tsekyi
  11. Seshuktin Dekyi, 29
  12. Bendetsang Yangchen

The nuns shouted pro-independence slogans, calling for the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet and wishing him a long life. Chinese security forces rounded up and beat the nuns, seriously assaulting Ani Taga, striking her head against the pavement; she was bleeding profusely. Bloodstains were found on the pavement. All 14 nuns are believed to be held in Kardze prison.
(reported by RFA, 12 May 2008)

Ten nuns protested at the county headquarters; they were arrested by the PSB and PAP. A few nuns, including one named Tragha, were severely beaten.
(reported by CTA, 13 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Police arrested Tashi Tsering who allegedly “ignited” a bomb “while passing an armed police station” on 8 April; police are seeking three other monks who, along with Tashi Tsering, allegedly intended to bomb “a fuel station and a police service spot” on 7 April, but failed.
According to the local police, “all the suspects had confessed to their crimes, claiming they had been listening to foreign radio for a long time and were following separatist propaganda from the Dalai Lama. They said the 14 March unrest had inspired them”.
[Notes: No reported casualties and no explanation given as to why the incident was not reported until almost two months later. In this 05/06/08 report, Xinhua stated that police had arrested sixteen monks and were seeking three others who were allegedly involved in three “separatist bomb attacks and plots”; however, the details provided contradict the total number of sixteen arrests. Monks named Tengpa Gyatso and Gyapa Dondrup and four others were reportedly arrested on 12 May; a monk named Tashi Tsering was also arrested on 12 May and police were seeking three others involved in the same incident; monks named Chogyal and Tenphel were arrested along with three others on 13 May. The total, according to this information, is twelve arrests.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Khenpa Lungpa monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

The arrival of a Chinese ‘work team’ on 10 May to conduct an intense and rigorous ‘patriotic re-education’ programme resulted in “bitter and heated” arguments between the monks and the Chinese authorities. Monks adamantly refused to sign official documents or write essays denouncing the Dalai Lama, leading to the arrest of ten monks at Khenpa Lungpa monastery on 12 May:

  1. Lodoe, aged 15
  2. Namgyal, aged 18
  3. Butuk, aged 13
  4. Jamyang Lodoe, aged 15
  5. Tsepak Namgyal, aged 15
  6. Kalsang Tashi, aged 17
  7. Jangdrup, aged 21
  8. Wangchuk, aged 22
  9. Tenpa Gyaltsen, aged 26
  10. Passang Tashi, aged 30

Khenpa monastery usually houses fewer than one hundred monks, but “few remaining monks” left the monastery and “returned to their respective homes in a solemn act of protest”.
(reported by TCHRD, 15 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Police arrested monks accused of being involved in “bombing a local resident’s home” on 15 April.
According to the local police, “all the suspects had confessed to their crimes, claiming they had been listening to foreign radio for a long time and were following separatist propaganda from the Dalai Lama. They said the 14 March unrest had inspired them”.
[Notes: Xinhua did not provide any further details about the incident; no reported casualties caused by the alleged bombing; no explanation given as to why the bombing incident was not reported until more than seven weeks later, and why the arrests were not reported until more than three weeks later. Xinhua did not specify how many monks were arrested in relation to this particular incident, but it is understood to be a total of six monks including Tengpa Gyatso and Gyapa Dondrup. Xinhua stated that in relation to three different alleged “separatist bomb attacks and plots”, police had arrested a total of sixteen monks and were seeking three others; however, the details provided contradict the total number of sixteen arrests. Monks named Tengpa Gyatso and Gyapa Dondrup and four others were reportedly arrested on 12 May; a monk named Tashi Tsering was also arrested on 12 May and police were seeking three others involved in the same incident; monks named Chogyal and Tenphel were arrested along with three others on 13 May. The total, according to this information, is twelve arrests.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Sunday, 11 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Two nuns, Sonam Lhamo and Thupten Dolma, from Drakar nunnery were arrested while calling for religious freedom and protesting against the Chinese authorities, in response to an ongoing ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign in Tibetan regions
(reported by TCHRD, 17 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Two nuns from Drakar [Dragkar] nunnery protested and scattered flyers but were subsequently arrested.

  1. Thubten Dolma (father’s name: Yonten Rigzin).
  2. Sonam Lhamo (from the Gyaye Ngozatsang family).
    (reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

Two Drakar nuns, Thubten Dolma and Sonam Lhamo, arrested after scattering flyers in Kardze town; the flyers called for the return of the Dalai Lama.
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

  Saturday, 10 May 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Khenpa Lungpa monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

The Chinese authorities have been conducting an intense ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign in Khenpa Lungpa monastery since the beginning of April 2008. On 10 May, the Chinese ‘work team’ entered the monastery to conduct an intense and rigorous ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign. [note: these events occurred in parallel with those at Woeser monastery, also located in Garthog township.]
(reported by TCHRD, 15 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Woeser monastery, Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

The Chinese authorities have been conducting an intense ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign in Woeser monastery since the beginning of April 2008. On 10 May, the Chinese ‘work team’ entered the monastery to conduct an intense and rigorous ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign. [note: these events occurred in parallel with those at Khenpa Lungpa monastery, also located in Garthog township.]
(reported by TCHRD, 15 May 2008)

  Friday, 09 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Following the arrest of around 140 monks on 7 May and the release of 122 on 8 May, Labrang monastery monks continued to protest, calling for the release of the 18 monks still in detention. Eleven of them were then released during the morning of 9 May. Despite the “additional contingents of armed police arriving at the monastery”, large numbers of monks “determined to secure the release of the remaining seven monks at all cost” protested again on 9 May. The authorities have refused to release those still detained. The situation at Labrang monastery remains extremely tense.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Labrang monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Eleven monks detained on 7 May were released on 9 May as a result of continued demands from Labrang monastery. Seven more remained in detention. Those released had been severely beaten; two monks named Jigme and Thapkhey had suffered more beatings than the others.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Sog county (Chin: Suo Xian)

A 15-year-old boy named Sonam Gyalpo shouted slogans such as “Tibet is an independent country” and “Long live the Dalai Lama” at the market intersection in Sog county. He was arrested by county PSB officers and taken to Nagchu town.
(reported by CTA, 24 May 2008)

  Thursday, 08 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

A “large number” of Labrang monks protested, calling for the release of the monks arrested on the previous day. The authorities, fearing the protest would escalate, released all those detained with the exception of 18 monks, but protests continued, calling for their release.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Labrang monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

The “remaining huge number of monks” protested for the release of the 149 monks arrested on the previous day. The authorities released 131 of the detained monks in order to prevent the protest from gaining further intensity.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Wednesday, 07 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

An estimated 5,000 PAP and PSB personnel surrounded Labrang monastery and carried out a sudden raid. Around 140 monks were arrested and detained.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Derong county (Chin: Derong Xian)

The Kandze [Kardze] TAP PSB issued a notice dated 7 May 2008, addressed to each PSB branch and police station throughout the 18 counties of Kandze TAP. The notice was seen at the beginning of June 2008 in the form of “a ‘wanted’ poster […] on a wall at Derong County checkpoint as well as on walls of civilian houses in towns in Kandze TAP. The “warrant” [apparently a ‘wanted’ poster, not actually a warrant] called for the arrest of 36 people wanted in relation to protests which had occurred in Kandze [Kardze] since March 2008. They are accused of being “national splitters” who “planned, organsied [sic] and created…criminal incidents harmful to the security of state in Tibetan areas”. The list, which contained the names of five females and seven monks, included:

  1. Rigzin Karma (Chin: Renzhen Gama), aged 22; a monk from Drango [Draggo] county.
  2. Choedrak (Chin: Quzha), aged 22; a monk from Drango [Draggo] county.
  3. Tsering Nyima (Chin: Zeren Nima, aged 25; a monk from Kandze [Kardze] county.
  4. Tashi (Chin: Zhaxi), aged 62; a villager from Serta county.
    (reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Papal, a former nun from Drakar nunnery, and Lagruk, a nun from Drakar nunnery, were detained for taking part in earlier protests.
(reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Lhadruk, a nun from Draggar nunnery in Serchu Teng township and Pay Pay, a former nun from Draggar nunnery, were arrested during the afternoon by the PSB for shouting slogans outside the county headquarters, including “Tibet is an independent country”, “Long live the Dalai Lama”.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Labrang monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Without warning, “thousands” of PAP personnel raided Labrang monastery in Ngaba county arrested 149 monks.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Doctor Yangzom and her husband Shilok, residents of the area under Key-ray Neighbourhood Committee in Lhasa, were arrested by Lhasa PSB personnel at around 10pm. Doctor Yangzom had retired after serving many years at Lhasa People’s Hospital, although she continued to serve there in retirement. She was arrested for providing medical treatment to those who were injured during the protests in Lhasa and nearby villages. Her husband, who had been doing tailoring work in his retirement, was arrested for allegedly passing information relating to protests in March to “separatists”. Their wellbeing following their arrest is not known.
[Note, RFA reported that they were arrested separately, on 3 and 6 May 2008.]
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

  Tuesday, 06 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Three monks staged a peaceful protest while dressed entirely in white; held the protest “in succession with one emerging after another”; they were severely beaten in public and arrested.

  1. Tsewang Drakpa.
  2. Thupten Gyatso.
  3. Jangsem.

[See also entry for Draggo county, 9 June 2008]
(reported by Tibetan Solidarity Committee, 09 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Morning: two women from Kandze County protested and scattered flyers; shouted “Long live the Dalai Lama” and “Free Tibet”. They were arrested “after the protest”.

  1. Lhadue, a nun from Drakar [Dragkar] nunnery; originally from Bendegon village near Kandze [Kardze] town.
  2. Pepe (nickname) from Kandze [Kardze] town; a former nun of Drakar [Dragkar] nunnery.
    (reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

A Tibetan woman named Yangdzom, works in retirement as a doctor at the Lhasa People’s Hospital, was detained three days after her husband [See RFA entry for 3 May 2008]. She was accused of secretly taking painkillers and other medications from the hospital to treat Tibetans injured in the [March] protests. Here whereabouts is unknown. The couple’s two children, both at university in China, returned home to Lhasa to find the family home had been looted.
(reported by RFA, 15 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Maldrogongkar county (Chin: Mozhugongka xian)

Between 6 and 7 May, groups of people who had been previously arrested and detained in Maldrogongkar county (as well as Phenpo Lhundrup and Tagtse counties) were released. Some of them had injuries; a man from Maldrogongkar county named Kunga, aged approximately 60 years, passed away within three days of his release.
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Between 6 and 7 May, approximately 300 (from 500 people arrested in Phenpo Lhundrup county) were released, including a group of approximately 35 nuns from Shar-Bhumpa [Shar Bumpa] nunnery. Among those released, a group of people were released from Lhasa prison and sent to their respective families in Phenpo Lhundrup county. Others from Maldrogongkar and Tagtse counties were also released. Some of those released had injuries
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Tagtse county (Chin: Dazi xian)

Between 6 and 7 May, groups of people who had been previously arrested and detained in Tagtse county (as well as Maldrogongkar and Phenpo Lhundrup counties) were released. Some of them had injuries
(reported by CTA, 20 May 2008)

  Monday, 05 May 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Local police arrested five monks from Wese monastery for allegedly bombed a transformer in Gartog township on 5 April 2008:

  1. Chogyal.
  2. Tenphel.
  3. (unknown).
  4. (unknown).
  5. (unknown).

According to the local police, “all the suspects had confessed to their crimes, claiming they had been listening to foreign radio for a long time and were following separatist propaganda from the Dalai Lama. They said the 14 March unrest had inspired them”.
[Notes: Xinhua gave no explanation why the incident was not reported until two months later. In this 05/06/08 report, Xinhua stated that police had arrested sixteen monks and were seeking three others who were allegedly involved in three “separatist bomb attacks and plots”; however, the details provided contradict the total number of sixteen arrests. Monks named Tengpa Gyatso and Gyapa Dondrup and four others were reportedly arrested on 12 May; a monk named Tashi Tsering was also arrested on 12 May and police were seeking three others involved in the same incident; monks named Chogyal and Tenphel were arrested along with three others on 13 May. The total, according to this information, is twelve arrests.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 13 May 2008)

  Sunday, 04 May 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Lathok Yuchu township

At approximately 9am, seven PSB officers raided the house of Akar Tashi (aged 38-39) in Lathok Yuchu township; they attempted to arrest Akar Tashi for his alleged involvement in the recent Lhasa protests and for his past involvement in other political activities. Akar Tashi resisted arrest and during a scuffle he allegedly stabbed one of the officers; Akar Tashi was then shot dead by the PSB officers.
(reported by CTA, 07 May 2008)

  Saturday, 03 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Dzamthang county (Chin: Rangtang xian)

Paljor and Dorjee Drakpa, two monks from Sangloong monastery, were arrested and beaten by the PSB for pleading at the PSB’s county office for the release of a fellow monk named Kunchok, arrested on 29 April.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

A 63-year-old retired Tibetan named Shelok, formerly of the Chinese border patrol, was taken from his residence between midnight and 1am and taken to Gutsa detention centre. He was accused of passing information about the death and detention of Tibetan protestors and prison conditions, to contacts outside Tibet; he was also accused of “helping Tibetan protestors in the hospital” [Lhasa People’s Hospital]. [See also RFA entry for 6 April 2008]
(reported by RFA, 15 May 2008)

  Friday, 02 May 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

For approximately 15 minutes, four students (two boys and two girls) from a middle school in Draggo county shouted slogans such as “Tibet is an independent country” and “His Holiness should be welcomed to Tibet and enthroned”.
(reported by CTA, 07 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Samtenling nunnery, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Date unclear; “around four or five days” before CTA reported the incident: At Samtenling (Watak) nunnery, people hung banners for over almost two kilometres, on which pro-independence slogans had been written in Tibetan and Chinese. The local authorities summoned officials from the nunnery and sent in work teams to impart ‘patriotic re-education’; however, the nuns walked out.
(reported by CTA, 07 May 2008)

  Thursday, 01 May 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Date unspecified; “beginning of May”: Drakpa, a monk from Gyuto monastery (a branch of Labrang Task-khil [Tashikhyil] monastery) was arrested by PSB officers; he was one of the monks who protested before a Chinese state-managed media tour [which included Western journalists] in April. His whereabouts not known.
(reported by CTA, 17 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzakhok, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Date unspecified: During the first week of May, thirteen “armed personnel trucks” arrived in Dzakhok, a remote area in Derge County [note: Dzakhok is possibly the name of a village]. The large number of armed personnel staying there has taken food from the local Tibetans, and forcefully claimed the fields owned by Tibetan villagers to use as their own vegetable plantation. Lay Tibetans and monks in the area are “currently being threatened” by the armed personnel.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

For the past week, restrictions have been the same as those imposed during the Cultural Revolution: the authorities go from house to house checking residence permits (obtainable only by Tibetans born and brought up in the Lhasa area; Chinese residents do not need permits); any Tibetan without a permit is detained. Tibetans have to report any visitor to the Lhasa Municipal Committee; hosts of any Tibetans visiting from outside Lhasa for business have to vouch for the guest, providing details of all relations, contacts, length of stay. No Tibetan from outside Lhasa is allowed to remain for more than ten days; no one is allowed to stay on pilgrimage; all holy sites are closed. These precautions are intended to prevent demonstrations during the Olympic torch relay in Lhasa in June; reportedly only one Tibetan from each family is allowed to witness the torch ceremony in front of the Potala Palace. Many Chinese troops are being dressed in civilian uniforms with blue hats and red hats; several thousand regular army troops are deployed in Lhasa. For two consecutive nights, trains arrived from China loaded with armoured vehicles and tanks; the area just below Drepung monastery is “packed with soldiers”. Tibetan members of the Communist Party are being subjected to intense political education; Tibetan officials monitored for their loyalty.
(reported by sources to RFA, 01 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Date unspecified: Monks and nuns arrested during their two-day protest in Phenpo Lhundrup county in March, including those from Gaden Choekhor monastery and Shar Bhumba nunnery, were released in May after nearly two months of detention. However, local authorities attempted to bar their re-admission into their respective monasteries and nunneries; this attempted failed due to strong opposition from local nuns, monks and laypeople.
(reported by CTA, 03 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Nagchu Shabten monastery, Nagchu town, Nagchu county (Chin: Naqu xian)

During the course of approximately eight days (1-8 May), “heavy machinery” was used to move eleven stupas from behind the prayer hall of Nagchu Shabten monastery and relocated to a crematorium at the foothill of Gyabri Dharcha Lhamo. The stupas had been damaged during the Cultural Revolution and subsequently repaired. County and prefectural officials told monks that the stupas were being moved because they did not look “appealing” enough to the many tourists who visited the monastery. The original location of the stupas was turned into a park. Monks and laypeople in the region have shown “much resentment” toward the relocation.
(reported by CTA, 08 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Dingri county (Chin: Dingri Xian)

Circa 1 May: Five or six military companies [PLA and/or PSB] have been deployed between Shigatse and Dingri; there is an estimated one soldier for every 50 meters in this area. Security is very tight in the Dingri area to prevent protests when the Olympic torch passes through the area. Chinese soldiers are being allowed to enter the Nepalese side of Mount Everest.
(reported by sources to RFA, 01 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Dram, Nyalam county

Circa 1 May: In preparation for the Olympic torch to be taken to the summit of Mount Everest, three additional military companies [PLA and/or PSB] were added to the two already stationed in the area of the Dram Friendship Bridge. [see also entry for Dingri county for 1 May 2008]
(reported by sources to RFA, 01 May 2008)

  Wednesday, 30 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Labrang eyewitness account; dates unclear: “Most of the monks arrested […] at that time [dates unclear due to lack of chronology in the eyewitness account, but the eyewitness appears to referring to arrests made between 9 and 15 April] were released when I was there” [Tibet Watch did not state when the eyewitness left Labrang; therefore, 30 April has been stated on this database as an approximate date]. Some of the monks’ families had to pay the “local authority” for their release, on average 5,000 yuan.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dza Gonsar monastery, Dza Bharma township, Derge county (Chin: Dege xian)

During ‘patriotic re-education’ sessions, work teams attempted to pressure monks to sign a letter stating that they oppose all “separatists”. The monks refused. In response, PAP personnel surrounded the monastery and tight restrictions were imposed.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Gonkhang temple, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Monks gathered in Gonkhang temple and one by one promised not to “sign up”, but were forcefully ordered by the authorities to do so.
[Note: Tibet Watch is referring to monks refusing to sign “patriotic re-education papers”; see Dzagonsar monastery, Monday 28 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Armed police near Ramoche Monastery [temple] “disguised themselves as tourists wearing red hats”; police “in other places have pretended to be tourists or civilian workers in black hats”; they have been “loitering about in the streets in small groups, some holding radio-telephones”. Small groups of “tourists” wearing the same coloured hats “were actually policemen”. Soldiers posted at Sera Monastery had replaced their military
uniforms with business suits with “Security Officer” badges on their chests.
Plainclothed police and paid informers have been wandering the streets of Lhasa and “mingling among Buddhist believers to monitor their daily religious rituals”; retired officers from legal enforcement departments have been enlisted as part-time non-uniformed police.
[The Epoch Times cites Voice of Tibet in Norway as the information source.]
(reported by The Epoch Times, 07 May 2008)

Date unspecified: Tenzin Choedak (a.k.a. Tenchoe), aged 20, was arrested from his house by Lhasa city PSB in April; he was alleged to be one of the leaders of the Lhasa protests in March.
Tenzin Choedak was born in Lhasa (his father’s name is Khedup); he is well educated and has worked with an international NGO serving the Tibetan community of Lhasa; “along with [a] few other people of similar case, [Tenzin Choedak] is about to be given arbitrary sentence”.
(reported by CTA, 20 June 2008)

Late April 2008: Konchog Dondrub, a monk aged between 26 and 30 from Thayi in Markham county, Chamdo Prefecture, was recently detained in Lhasa along with two other monks, Tashi Gyaltsen and Choedrub Norbu. Chinese officials had issued a ‘wanted’ notice for Konchog Dondrub in the local newspapers and on television, offering a reward of 22,000 yuan to anyone providing information leading to his capture. He was suspected of participating in the March demonstrations and unrest in Lhasa, and had subsequently disappeared. Towards the end of April he was detained at the residence of two monks from Gyuto school at Ramoche monastery in Lhasa. RFA’s source stated that Tashi Gyaltsen and Choedrub Norbu will be charged with the same crime as Konchog Dondrub because they sheltered him.
(reported by sources to RFA, 03 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Nalanda monastery, Phenpo Lhundrup (Ch: Lingzhi) county

Date unspecified: Moenpa (his nickname) and two monks from Nalanda monastery were arrested in April; they were beaten by the PAP and made to kneel on stones with their “necks tied with automobile tyres”. They were later released [date unspecified; some time before July]; however, their health has deteriorated due to torture.
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Tuesday, 29 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Bardzi township, Dawu county (Ch: Daofu xian)

PSB officers arrested Nyima Drakpa, 41-year-old former monk from Nya-tso monastery. He had previously been arrested in 1998 for being “one of the first people to hang pro-independence posters in Dawu county”.
(reported by CTA, 06 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Seven nuns and one layperson were sentenced to prison on 29 April for protesting in Chori, Draggo county.

  1. Khandro Lhamo, aged 32 (seven-year sentence)
  2. Khagongtsang Choedron, 43 (seven-year sentence)
  3. Drolma Yangtso, 23 (seven-year sentence)
  4. Wangmo, 29 (seven-year sentence)
  5. Yibu, 22 (three-year sentence)
  6. Drolyang, 42 (three-year sentence)
  7. Sonam Choedron, 28 (three-year sentence)
  8. Kalsang Dorje, 39 (layperson; three-year sentence)

Of 200 people detained in Kardze [not specified whether Kardze town, county or prefecture] since 24 March, 93 were nuns; the rest were monks and laypersons; of the 200 detained, 20 people remain in detention.
(reported by RFA, 12 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Dzamthang county (Chin: Rangtang xian)

A monk named Kunchok [believed to be from Sangloong monastery] was arrested for shouting slogans in front of the local PSB office.
(reported by CTA, 12 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

At an open court session on Tuesday morning, Lhasa Intermediate People’s Court sentenced seventeen people in connection with the Lhasa violence on 14 March.
Soi’nam Norbu [Tib: Sonam Norbu], born in 1988, a driver with a Lhasa real estate company, was “one of the mobs which burnt vehicles in a square near the Johkang Monastery, smashed police stations and fire engines with stones, and assaulted firemen”; he was “convicted of arson and disrupting public services” and sentence to life.
Basang [Tib: Pasang], a monk from Doilungdeqen county [Tib: Toelung Dechen; Chin: Duilongdeqing] in Lhasa Municipality was also sentenced to life; he had “led 10 people — including five monks — to destroy the local government office, smash or burn down 11 shops and rob their valuables, and attack policemen on duty”.
Of the five monks who “followed” Basang, two were sentenced to 20 years and the other three to 15 years.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 29 April 2008)

Lhasa People’s Municipal Intermediate Court held a “public trial against 30 so-called rioters”; those in attendance were “selected and arranged” by local government organisations including the Communist Party Committee, People’s Congress and Resident Committees. Those on trial had been “cruelly coerced”; one of them was “unable to stand up maybe because his legs were broken”. Some attendees said that “all formal procedures such as lawyers’ arguments and defendants’ statements” were “completely eliminated” from the trial.
[The Epoch Times cites Voice of Tibet in Norway as the information source.]
(reported by The Epoch Times, 07 May 2008)

The Intermediate People’s Court in Lhasa conducted a “sentencing rally” (xuanpan dahui) during which thirty Tibetans’ sentences, which ranged from three years to life in prison, were announced. Reports from the official Chinese news agency Xinhua characterised the proceedings as an “open court session.” However, The trials of the thirty Tibetans accused of participating in violent protests on 14 March in Lhasa were not open and public, as claimed by the Chinese government, and did not meet minimum international standards of due process. The actual trial proceedings, in which evidence from the prosecution was introduced, had been conducted covertly on undisclosed dates earlier in April. Guilty or innocent, these Tibetans (and any other defendant in China), are entitled to a fair trial. Instead, they were tried on secret evidence behind closed doors, without the benefit of a meaningful defence by lawyers they had chosen.
Severe flaws in the regional authorities’ handling of the Tibetan protests precluded fair trials of people suspected of having participated in the disturbances. These flaws included a consistent failure to establish a distinction between peaceful and violent protesters, statements by the Procuratorate (the Public Prosecution) at the time of the suspected protesters’ arrest that assumed their guilt rather than their innocence, and secret trial proceedings.
(reported by HRW, 29 April 2008)

The first sentences for those involved in the 14 March Lhasa riot were handed down by the Intermediate People’s Court of Lhasa; 30 people; sentences ranging from three years to life; convicted of “arson, robbery, disrupting public order and assaulting government offices, among other crimes”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 11 July 2008)

More than 200 people attended an “open trial” during which the Intermediate People’s Court of Lhasa sentenced 30 Tibetans, including six monks, to jail terms ranging from three years to life for their roles in “deadly riots” in Lhasa on 14 March. These were the first sentences since the 14 March incidents.
Three people were given life sentences:
Soi’nam Cering (Tib: Sonam Tsering), a driver with a Lhasa real estate company born in 1988, “joined mobs which burned vehicles in a square near the Johkang Monastery, smashed police stations and fire engines with stones, and assaulted firemen. He was convicted of arson and disrupting public services”.
Basang (Tib: Passang), a monk from Doilungdeqen County in Lhasa, “led 10 people – including five monks – to destroy the local government office, smash or burn down 11 shops and rob them, and attack policemen on duty, the court said. Of the five monks who followed Basang, two were sentenced to 20 years and the other three to 15 years in jail”.
A 30-year-old businessman Cering (Tib: Tsering) was convicted of “inciting others to loot shops and burn vehicles and buildings in his home county of Lingzhou, about 70 kilometers outside Lhasa, during riots on March 15 and 16, the court said. His actions were described as a major cause of the persistent unrest in Lingzhou”.
(reported by ShanghaiDaily.com, 30 April 2008)

A “public court session” commenced on Tuesday morning at the Intermediate People’s Court, Lhasa. Thirteen people were sentenced that afternoon, “bringing the number of people imprisoned for involvement in the 14 March riot to 30”. Sentences ranged from three to thirty years.
(reported by Xinhua/People's Daily , 29 April 2008)

A Chinese court imposed sentences on 30 Tibetans [allegedly] involved in the recent protests in Tibet. Three were given life sentences; seven were given sentences of over 15 years; the remaining twenty were given sentences ranging from three to fourteen years.
Contrary to Chinese allegations that the 30 Tibetans’ sentences were related to 14 March protests in Lhasa, Pasang (a.k.a. Ngawang Ignyen) was given a life sentence [note: CTA does not state why the sentencing of Pasang could not be related to 14 March protests in Lhasa]. Furthermore, most of those who received 15-year sentences were monks from Dhingkha monastery, Toelung Dechen (Chin: Duilongdeqing) county, while other individuals sentenced were from Phenpo Lhundrub (Chin: Lingzhi) county.
CTA notes that protests in Toelung Dechen county and Phenpo Lhundrub county began after 14 March, “therefore those sentenced cannot be linked to the 14 March protests in Lhasa” [however, it is possible that those individuals from Toelung and Phenpo counties were visiting nearby Lhasa on 14 March]
Sentences imposed were apparently not consistent, with those who lived in villages being given longer sentences.
(reported by CTA, 06 May 2008)

  Monday, 28 April 2008
  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Darlag county (Chin: Dari)

Following several peaceful protests in Darlag county since 21 March, the security forces and the armed forces have arrested countless monks and laypeople but other protesters escaped and avoided arrest. Additional security forces were deployed on 28 April to arrest those protestors who had fled. One security official was reported to have died while attempting to make arrests, and a 22-year-old monk named Choedhen (a.k.a. Choetop) from Pongkor Toema township was shot dead by PSB officers on 28 April.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Hongke, Dari (Jimai) county (Chin: Darlag Xian)

An ethnic Tibetan police officer named Lama Cedain arrived at Hongke on Monday morning to arrest a 21-year-old monk, identified by Tibetan sources as Quduo, and shot him. It was not clear if the monk had been resisting arrest.
The monk was wanted by the authorities after he took part in a Tibetan independence demonstration in the nearby town of Dari on 21 March. During the protest he climbed onto the local government offices, pulled down the Chinese flag flying above the building and set fire to it in protest against Chinese rule.
After the monk was killed, angry villagers turned on the police officer; they fetched guns, commonly used in the area for hunting and also in provincial border disputes among Tibetans vying to collect [lucrative] caterpillar fungus for traditional herbal medicines, and shot the police officer six times, according to state media.
The young monk’s father, identified as Sangsang Lailai, was arrested in the police raid; there are no details of other injuries or detentions.
(reported by The Times, 02 May 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Ponkor Toema township, Darlag county

Chinese armed security forces surrounded a nomadic hamlet in Ponkor Toema township; at dawn, the armed security forces fired live ammunition at the nomads, killing a 22-year-old nomad named Choetop. The security forces removed the corpse; as of 29 April it had not been returned to the deceased’s family for funeral rites. The situation in Ponkor Toema township remains tense, with an increasing presence of Chinese security personnel.
(reported by TCHRD, 29 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzagonsar monastery, Tehor, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

At around 1pm, thirteen trucks containing “military forces and high local officials arrived in Tihor [Tehor] township from Derge county” [note: Tehor is located in Derge county. Tibet Watch is understood to be referring to Derge town, the county capital]. They announced that Dzagonsar monastery would be sealed off if the monks did not sign “patriotic re-education papers” [see also Dzagonsar monastery, 1 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08].
The officials charged Geshe Tashi Gyamtso, Samphel (the chant master) and Lobsang Dhonyun (a teacher) as the “main perpetrators of the crimes”.
[Note: Tashi Gyamtso and Lobsang Dhonyun were reportedly arrested on the previous day, i.e. before the 28 April 2008 protest in Derge county; Samphel was hospitalised “due to his torture by Chinese authorities at this time”, i.e. circa 27 April 2008, although no specific dates or further details were provided. The “crimes” referred to are understood to be the refusal by local monks and laypeople to denounce the Dalai Lama, rather than the 28 April 2008 protest in Derge county which occurred in response to the arrests.]
The officials announced that “they would arrest any other protest organisers who did not respect the patriotic re-education campaign”, and that they would “crack down against any monks rebuking authority”. Furthermore, they added that “out of 54 monasteries in Derge County, Dzagonsar was the worst in resisting the government and would therefore be punished”. Monks and nuns “answered they would not sign in denouncing the Dalai Lama”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kana, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Local people held a peaceful protest calling for the unconditional release of all innocent Tibetans arrested [in Kana village and Tehor township] during the previous few days. The march was stopped by “Chinese military soldiers on the way to Derge county” [note: the protest took place in Derge county; Tibet Watch’s reference to “Derge county” means Derge town, the county capital. It is understood that it was the protesters, not the soldiers, who were heading for Derge town].
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Woenpo Gaden Dho-ngak Shedup Dhargeyling, Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu xian)

PAP personnel raided a village near Voen-po [Woenpo] Gaden Dho-ngak Shedup Dhargeyling. Altars with portraits of the Dalai Lama were mishandled. During one such incident, a girl [age not provided] by the name of T. Lhamo shouted that the Dalai Lama was her supreme protector and that he should welcomed back to Tibet, and “Long Live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. She demanded to know why Tibetans could not have the portrait of the Dalai Lama at their altars; she also demanded an explanation for the arbitrary arrests of A-drel Lama Rinpoche and monks from the local monastery. T. Lhamo later committed suicide by hanging herself.
(reported by CTA, 06 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Namtso monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Chinese officials arrived at Namtso monastery and attempted to raise the PRC flag; a monk tried to stop them and was severely beaten by PSB personnel.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Ra Tsedak, aged 32, and Gondon Sangay, aged 35, both from Mehu-ruma village and arrested earlier, were transferred [on 28 April?] to a prison in Dawu Chang Yen, near Chengdu.
Monks and laypeople arrested in Ngaba county in recent weeks were detained in Dawu Chang Yen; many had broken limbs but were denied proper medical care.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

Additional PAP personnel were deployed in Ngaba county at around 11am.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Chushur county (Chin: Chushui)

Nuns from Shugseb [Shugsib] nunnery and monks from Gangri Thoekar monastery protested locally; county police arrested nineteen nuns (including Dangdug and Tsondue) and four monks [CTA’s wording suggests that this is the total number of people involved in the demonstration]; they are being detained in the county prison.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Gangri Thoekar monastery, Tselna, Chushur county (Chin: Chushui xian),

Monks from Gangri Thoekar monastery joined nuns from Shugseb nunnery in a demonstration. County police arrested four monks and 19 nuns [it is not clear whether or not this is the total number involved in the demonstration]. They were detained in the county prison. Security forces have since imposed tight restrictions within Gangri Thoekar monastery (home to approximately 20 monks).
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Lhasa People’s Intermediate Court sentenced Yeshe, a 35-year-old Tibetan from Phenpo Lhundrup county, to 12 years imprisonment: seven years for “storming and charging at the government offices” and 5 years for “inciting unrest”. The 12-year sentence will be followed by a further two years of deprivation of ‘political rights’.
(reported by TCHRD, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

Sera monastery re-opened to both worshippers and tourists on Monday 28 April, having been closed since the “unrest in the regional capital” on 14 March 2008. Buddhist services at the monastery resumed on 20 April.
“In recent days, the monks have been taught legal knowledge and the monastery has resumed its normal religious activities”, according to Tenzin Namgyal, deputy director of the Tibet autonomous regional ethnic and religious affairs committee. He added, “It’s the first monastery in Lhasa to reopen to outsiders. The others will follow suit in the future. Many [Chinese] tourists and worshippers came to the monastery today, and many more are expected in the coming days”.
A tourist from Guangzhou claimed: “I have been in Lhasa for two days. Life here is back to normal”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 30 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Shugsib nunnery, Tselnashang, Chushur county (Chin: Chushui xian)

Following a protest by nuns of Shugseb [Shugsib] nunnery, the armed forces have imposed tight restrictions within the nunnery [see also Chushur county, 28 April 2008; CTA 02/05/08].
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Thoekar monastery, Chushur (Chin: Chushui) county

Following a protest by monks of Thoekar monastery, the armed forces have imposed tight restrictions within the monastery [see also Chushur county, 28 April 2008; CTA 02/05/08].
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Sunday, 27 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzagonsar monastery, Tehor, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

The Chinese authorities arrested Tashi Gyamtso, a Geshe graduate from Drepung monastery in South India [note: Tibet Watch’s incomplete sentence “Tashi Gyamtso, Dzagonsar’s monastery’s a Geshe graduate…” suggests that Tashi Gyamtso held a key position at Dzagonsar monastery].
Dzagonsar monastery’s chant master, Samphel, was hospitalised in Kandze [Kardze] prefecture “due to his torture by Chinese authorities at this time” [no specific dates or further details provided].
[See also: Dzagonsar monastery, 28 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08].
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kana, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Lobsang Dhonyun, a highly respected teacher from Dzagonsar monastery in Tihor [Tehor] township was arrested at Kana village. When the local villagers attempted to prevent his arrest, PAP personnel fired warning shots. Lhakpa Tsering, a layperson, was arrested.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Zakhog monastery, Derge county (Chin: Dege xian)

Lobsang Dhonyoe, a tutor at Zakhog monastery, was arrested at midnight along with two other monks, identified as Phurga and Tanam (these two monks were released the following morning).
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: In Lhasa, residents report tight security and an oppressive police presence. The city is scheduled to re-open for tourism in May, and only the Jokhang temple remains closed; other monasteries are open to the public.
Tibetan residents have to have two IDs to go grocery shopping: a residence permit and an ID issued by the Lhasa municipal government. Lhasa residents have been told not to leave the city or to move around until the end of May; Lhasa residents are “being forced to criticise the Dalai Lama”.
Those who rent shops or homes have been warned that if they have links to separatists, or if protesters are found on their properties, the property owners will be detained and punished.
(reported by CTA, 27 April 2008)

  Saturday, 26 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Bada Samdupling monastery, Tzenda township, Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu xian)

Monks refused to sign blank documents and walked out of a ‘patriotic re-education’ session.
Three of the monastery’s 70 monks had been arrested during a protest in Lhasa in March 2008:

  1. Gelek Thapkhey, aged 27.
  2. Gelek Drakpa, aged 28.
  3. Tenzin Phuntsok, aged 17.
    (reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Shiwa Lhathim monastery, Raloong township, Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong xian)

Date unspecified, reported 26 April: Chinese “work teams” arrived at Shiwa monastery (a branch of Shiva Lhathim monastery) and ordered three senior monks to fly the Chinese flag on the monastery’s roof; the monks refused. Local police sought the alleged leader of a demonstration held “earlier”; the monks said that there was no individual leader. No arrests were made. Tight restrictions continue at the monastery, where around 200 “armed” [security personnel] are stationed.
(reported by CTA, 26 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Zakhog monastery, Derge county (Chin: Dege xian)

Tashi Gyaltsen, the former abbot of Zakhog monastery, and Samphel, the monastery’s chant master, were arrested at approximately 8am.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Potala Palace, Lhasa

The Potala Palace re-opened to [Chinese] tourists on 26 April.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 30 April 2008)

  Friday, 25 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Date unspecified: A petition campaign to vilify the Dalai Lama was launched amongst nomads and farmers in Draggo county. Tashi Sangpo, a young farmer from Gephen Li-khokma village, refused to provide his signature and was severely beaten; he was taken to hospital but was later detained for his alleged involvement in earlier protests in Draggo county.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Woenpo monastery, Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu Xian)

Approximately three people living near Voen-po [Woenpo] monastery were arrested and severely beaten by Chinese police. Seventy-year-old Gyalong Sonam Nyendak from Voen-po [Woenpo] monastery has been suffering from depression due to the intense pressure that has been imposed by the Chinese authorities.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Chugkha Jang, Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi xian)

Exact dates unclear: A nun from Shar Bhumpa nunnery (from the Gerpa family in Chugkha Jang village), who had been severely beaten after participating in protests in March, was discharged from the county hospital [possibly on 25 April]. She remains in a critical condition.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Approximately 20 people from Gaden Choekhor town, who had been arrested during protests in March, were transferred to Lhasa [it is assumed they were transferred from a local PSB detention centre to a prison in Lhasa].
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Thursday, 24 April 2008
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Tibet received its first domestic tour group since the 14 March unrest; a 15-member tour group from the eastern city of Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, arrived at Lhasa Railway Station at about 9:50pm. They were due to visit the Potala Palace, the Norbulingka and Yamdroktso Lake before leaving on Saturday afternoon.
Following the 14 March unrest, “the regional government stopped issuing tourist permits to overseas travellers and the tourism authorities suggested travel agencies postpone organising tour groups in the wake of the riot. It cited safety concerns and the reconstruction of tourism facilities around scenic spots damaged in the unrest. Independent domestic travellers have not been prohibited from entering the region”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 24 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Shelkar town, Dingri county (Chin: Dingri xian)

Around 3,000 armed forces [sic] were deployed in Shelkar town; a few days earlier, a “sizeable force” was deployed in Drakmar village, Shelkar town and a “sizeable force” was also deployed on Ghung-la mountain, Solu-Khumbu. The yak herders of Choe-loong monastery, Dingri county, were forced to act as porters for the security forces.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Wednesday, 23 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Two nuns from Drakar nunnery arrested for calling for the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet:

  1. Bumo Lhaga.
  2. Sonam Dekyi.
    (reported by FTC, 15 May 2008)

At around 1 pm, two nuns from Drakar nunnery held a peaceful protest at Kardze county town market; they were Sonam Dekyi, aged 30, from Serchu village, Kardze town, and Lagha, aged 32, from Dzongpa village. They scattered hundreds of small pieces of paper around the market, containing statements such as “Tibet is an independent country” and “Long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. After a “considerable amount of time” they were arrested by security forces; the nuns’ subsequent whereabouts unknown.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

Two nuns from Kandze Tagkar nunnery, Sonam Dekyi aged 20 and Lhaga aged 31, distributed leaflets and posters containing Tibetan slogans, opposing Chinese rule and the crackdown against Tibetans. After half an hour, at least 15 PAP personnel arrested the nuns; their whereabouts unknown.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

At around 1pm, two nuns from Drakar nunnery, Kardze county, protested in Kardze town centre. The nuns, Bumo Lhaga, aged 32, and Sonam Dechen, aged 30, distributed hand-written flyers calling for the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet and saying that Tibet is independent; the flyers declared that they were acting on their own and that Drakar nunnery was not involved in their protest. Chinese security officers saw the flyers and began to collect them, demanding to know who had distributed them. The nuns were then arrested on a street corner while shouting slogans calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and for freedom for Tibetans; during the arrests they continued to shout but were quickly taken away in a police vehicle to a local detention centre; their subsequent whereabouts unknown.
(reported by sources to RFA, 23 April 2008)

At around 1pm, two nuns from Drakar nunnery handed out leaflets in Kardze town centre calling for the return of the Dalai Lama to Tibet and saying that Tibet is independent. Chinese security officers saw the flyers and began to collect them, demanding to know who had distributed them.
The nuns, identified as Bumo Lhaga, aged 32, and Sonam Dekyi, aged 30, were seen on a street corner shouting slogans calling for the return of the Dalai Lama and for freedom for Tibetans. They were quickly detained and taken away in a police vehicle; even while they were taken away, they continued to shout.
A second witness said the nuns “were fully prepared for the eventualities that would follow. They were dressed warmly and bundled themselves to face both beating and cold during detention. There were armed Chinese police everywhere but they couldn’t see them protesting for quite some time, and then later when they came for the second round, the police saw flyers. When police asked who had distributed the flyers, they showed themselves and shouted slogans in the presence of police”.
Sonam Dekyi’s mother, contacted by phone on 26 April, said: “My daughter, Sonam Dekyi, fulfilled her purpose in life; she made her own decision to protest, knowing fully the risk and danger that she would face. I am not worried at all. If she doesn’t survive Chinese torture, I have no regrets…As His Holiness wished, she protested peacefully and didn’t resort to any kind of violence”.
The two women are believed to have been taken to Kardze detention centre. The sources told RFA that the nuns’ flyers “indicated that they were acting on their own and that the Drakar nunnery wasn’t involved in the protest”.
A Kardze PSB official said “No nuns were arrested”, adding “I don’t know”.
(reported by RFA, 27 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Jomda county (Chin: Jiangda xian)

Date unspecified: Two men from Jomda have been released from prison. They were arrested on 14 March for their alleged involvement in demonstrations in Lhasa; they were taken to Gutsa prison [detention centre] and were later transferred to a prison in a “very cold location”. They endured “various torture methods” and reported that Tibetan prisoners were denied regular food, and some resorted to drinking their own urine. Before they were released, the other prisoners asked them to report the prison conditions to Tibetans outside Tibet, including the CTA in India. Both the released Tibetans were in poor physical condition from torture and beatings during their imprisonment.
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Tuesday, 22 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Labrang eyewitness account: One week [note, 22 April is an approximate date] after Jamyang Jinpa was arrested at Labrang monastery [see Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, 15 April 2008; Tibet Watch 01/07/08], he was released “in the name of medical treatment”. Serious health problems due to torture endured “for almost 12 hours a day”; his health deteriorated within the week following his release; was hospitalised for two weeks; his family had to pay for his treatment.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

In a village near Rongpo monastery, security forces confiscated explosives from a few families. The explosives had earlier been provided by government offices, and were used by Tibetan farmers to ward off extreme weather, especially hail storms that can ruin the farmers’ crops.
(reported by CTA, 24 April 2008)

Almost “200 Chinese military” have been deployed to monasteries everywhere in the Rebkong region since 19 April.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

The security forces entered Rongpo Gonchen monastery’s protective deity chamber (typically a small room where a monastery’s deity statue is housed, and where hunters and poachers give up their weapons while vowing to abstain from hunting). The security personnel removed knives, bows and arrows; these items were arranged outside the monastery and photographed allegedly for propaganda purposes.
(reported by CTA, 24 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Yama Tashi Kyil monastery, Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren xian)

At Tashi Kyil monastery, monks’ quarters “and also that of Alak Dotsang” searched by police; cash, a computer and many CDs removed.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Chogri, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

In Chogri (a.k.a Chokri) town, Chinese officials began collecting signatures on blank pieces of paper, without providing any explanation. In the past, residents of Draggo county were “ordered” to grow certain plants and trees on most of their agricultural land, for which they were given “financial compensation”. Currently, people were told that if they still want to claim any compensation, they had to provide their signatures. It was also announced that poorer families in the region would be provided with assistance towards their children’s school fees if they provided their signatures. Very few people provided their signatures, while others emphasised that even though they were poor, they had no desire to take the money.
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mi-nyak Garthar, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu xian)

Tibetans farmers from Mi-nyak Garthar stopped farming on 22 April but were ordered by county officials to immediately resume work; the farmers continued to be harassed by the officials.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mi-nyak Lha-ghang village, Dartsedo county (Chin: Kangding xian)

Many posters declaring “Tibet is an independent country”, “His Holiness must be welcomed back to Tibet” and “Tibetans want freedom” were distributed in Mi-nyak Lha-ghang village, Dartsedo county. Police investigated, seeking the person(s) responsible.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Monday, 21 April 2008
  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Mangra county (Chin: Guinan Xian)

Date unspecified: “Chinese prostitutes are being used to lure arrests of people involved in the recent protests in Tibet”.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tehor, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

At least 15 policemen from Derge County police station came to Tihor [Tehor] township to enforce a ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign, which required local Tibetans to denounce and criticise the Dalai Lama, and sign [statements declaring that he is] a separatist. The authorities tried to mislead the local people into signing by asking them to sign up to register for new identity cards, again without success.
[See also Dzagonsar monastery, 1 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Date unspecified: Chinese authorities have offered a 30,000 yuan reward for Lobsang Jinpa, who allegedly participated in a protest in Ngaba county in March. A reward of 15,000 yuan has been offered for a man injured in a protest in March, but who fled the scene. The authorities announced that those who protest against the Dalai Lama and the Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) will receive monthly salaries. Since 21 April, all officials in Ngaba county were instructed to lead activities against the Dalai Lama and the CTA; such activities will be filmed.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Sunday, 20 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Lithang monastery, Lithang county (Chin: Litang xian)

Officials arrived at Lithang monastery [CTA provided no further details, but this incident was linked to the report of attempts to force monks to provide their signatures on blank pieces of paper without explanation on 4-5 April].
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tse-nyi monastery, Lithang county (Chin: Litang xian)

Date unclear; presumed from context of report to be 20 April: At Tse-nyi monastery, a branch of Lithang monastery, officials announced that each monk would be photographed holding a Chinese flag in one hand while signing their names with their other hand; all the monks refused to participate.
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Woenpo monastery, Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu Xian)

Monks from Voen-po [Woenpo] monastery were summoned to patriotic re-education classes by work teams in Dzamey sub-district. During the meeting, four statements opposing “separatists” were announced, and monks were given orders to raise the Chinese flag on their monastery roof. The monks expressed their discontent and work teams “had to rescind their flag order”.
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

Buddhist services resumed at Sera monastery on 20 April 2008.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 30 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Nagchu (Chin: Naqu)

Many pro-independence posters appeared in Nagchu town and in Sog county during April. Chokdhen Tsultrim, a 19-year-old monk from Zendhen monastery in Sog county, was arrested in Nagchu town on 20 April in connection with the posters. He is currently being detained in Sog county prison.
(reported by CTA, 24 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Sog county (Chin: Suo Xian)

Many pro-independence posters appeared in Nagchu town (Nagchu county) and in Sog county during April. Chokdhen Tsultrim, a 19-year-old monk from Zendhen monastery in Sog county, was arrested in Nagchu town on 20 April in connection with the posters. He is currently being detained in Sog county prison.
(reported by CTA, 24 May 2008)

  Saturday, 19 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dawu (Tawu) county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

A Tibetan man named Nyima Drakpa, described as “a very smart person” with “many connections” was detained in Tawu county, for allegedly contacting a reporter in Hong Kong, and providing information and photographs regarding the recent protests in Tibet. He was given a phone number by a contact in Dharamsala, India, and told a Hong Kong reporter in Mandarin that Tibetans were not protesting against the Chinese people or the Beijing Olympic Games, but stated that Tibetans have no human rights and their religious teachers are not allowed to visit them in Tibet.
On 5 April, Nyima Drakpa suspected he was in trouble when “Chinese officials mentioned several countries contacted from Tawu […] so he stopped staying at his own home”.
Late on 19 April, Nyima Drakpa was travelling to his sister’s home with a friend when he was stopped and detained, not by local police, but by PSB officers who “came in three vehicles from China” according to one source. Nyima Drakpa is reportedly being held in Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) town; his relatives weren’t allowed to contact him.
Nyima Drakpa had previously been detained for 15 days, for copying statements by the Dalai Lama; he was later detained briefly for allegedly putting up posters calling for Tibetan independence, but he was released when another man confessed.
(reported by RFA, 27 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Serthar county (Chin: Seda Xian)

Monks and laypeople staged a demonstration at a monastery, but they were suppressed by military police. Witnesses say people were killed or injured; no further details available.
(reported by Woeser blog/chinadigitaltimes, 20 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, Dzoge county (Chin: Ruanggui/Zoige Xian)

Around 190 young monks fled Tak-tsang Lhamo Kirti monastery due to the tight restrictions imposed on the monks by the authorities. Around 21 monks had been arrested at different times for their alleged participation in a protest on 15 March in Dzoege county market; ‘patriotic re-education’ classes were ongoing; the monks were constantly harassed and it was expected that more monks would be arrested. The situation at the monastery remains tense.
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Nechung Nangten Lobling monastery, Lhasa

During a ‘patriotic re-education’ class at Nechung Nangten Lobling monastery, a monk stood up and said the monks do not need patriotic re-education classes and had no desire to participate. Other monks and laypeople joined in to express their discontent over the classes. Six or seven monks were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Friday, 18 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Dogo township, Chone county (Chin: Zhouni Xian)

Date unclear: Xinhua reported on 18 April that two “riotous monks” have “surrendered to the authorities” after participating in demonstrations in Dogo township on 18 March (See Dogo township, Chone county, 18 March). “After the violence”, Xinhua reported, police issued a circular urging the “criminal suspects” to surrender. Garzang Samdain (born 1971) and Garzang Samzhou (born 1980) from Goinba monastery in Zho’nyin (Zhouni) county, both “came forward and confessed their crimes”. An investigation revealed the two were “of the Tibetan ethnic group”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 18 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Tsandak monastery, Manna, Machu (Chin: Maqu) county

Twenty-three trucks each carrying 30-50 troops from Lanzhou Northwestern Military Command reportedly arrived at Tsendrok monastery in Maima; the troops raided the monastery, claiming to search for weapons. Rifles were found “stored at the monastery by nomads” and sacred religious objects and relics with a gross value of more than 105 million yuan were taken from the monastery, including a large golden Buddha statue. Monks complained; officials said they were investigating.
(reported by RFA, 26 June 2008)

The “Chinese local authority deployed military trucks full of military personnel into Tsandak monastery” in Manna township [note: it is unlikely that the local authority had power to deploy military personnel]. “The trucks surrounded the monastery, and [the military personnel] carried out a house by house search, also searching the prayer hall and other small temples” [sic].
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Following the arrest over one hundred Tibetans on 17 April during the crackdown by Chinese security forces against demonstrations, the situation remains “tense and volatile”; the Chinese authorities are not allowing visitors to meet those detained. [See entries for Rong Gonchen monastery, Rebkong county, 17-18 April.]
(reported by TCHRD, 18 April 2008)

Following the arrest over one hundred Tibetans on 17 April during the crackdown by Chinese security forces against demonstrations and the subsequent raid on Rong Gonchen monastery, armed Chinese security forces continue to keep a close watch over the monks; their movements are severely restricted; they are “isolated from each other without any form of interaction”. They have been issued a terse warning about leaking information to the outside world. The exact number of monks arrested remains unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 18 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Tight restrictions were enforced after a large contingent of security forces arrived at Rongpo Gonchen monastery; the armed forces were most likely from Hunan province.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

Seventeen arrests were made at Rongwo monastery. Alak Khaso [arrested on 17 April] was seriously injured and taken to hospital in Xining; his whereabouts not known.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Yama Tashi Kyil monastery, Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren xian)

A search was conducted at Yama Tashi Kyil monastery; the residence of Alak Drotsang was searched extensively. No arrests were reported on that day.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Chogri, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Khe-tsun (Khetsun), the former abbot of Chokri monastery, in Chokri (a.k.a Chogri) town, arrested on 25 March, was released on 18 April due to his deteriorating health.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Police are still searching for 88 suspects who were “heavily involved in the March 14 riot” in Lhasa. Lhasa PSB claims to have evidence against 170 people; 82 have of whom have been formally arrested, 11 of whom “surrendered to police”; 88 are “still at large”. To date, 365 suspects have surrendered; at least 328 were freed because of the minor nature of their offences and willingness to cooperate in the police investigation. Lhasa PSB vice director Jiang Zaiping told Xinhua that the majority of the suspects “have pled guilty, and many of them were cheated or pressured into the smashing, beating, looting and arson. Some turned in their collaborators”. Many citizens in Lhasa allegedly “provided clues” to help the investigation, helping police “identify the suspects” while others “accompanied investigators to the suspects’ possible hideouts”. Jiang Zaiping reportedly claimed that Lhasa has “restored social order” and promised that his department will “strive to fight crime and make the citizens feel safer”. The municipal government, Xinhua claimed, has earmarked one million yuan (US$ 143,000) to build new homes for the 59 people from ten families whose houses on the downtown East Beijing Road were “burned down by mobs”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 18 April 2008)

  Thursday, 17 April 2008
  Outside Tibetan Regions » Lanzhou, Gansu Province

Lodoe Wangpo (a.k.a. Shidae Gyatso) was arrested and detained from Lanzhou. After his arrest, the Chinese authorities closed down a school which he had established and its students were sent to a primary school in Machu county.
[See also: Machu county, 27 May 2008; CTA 12/06/08].
(reported by CTA, 12 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rebkong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

At around 11 am, 22 monks from Rong Gonchen monastery staged a peaceful demonstration in Rebkong county market calling for the release of three monks (Lobsang Dhondup, 20 years old; Drakpa, 28 years old; and Lobsang Dhondup, 30 years old) who had been arrested on 13 April 2008 for participating in a peace march on 16 March 2008. The monks demonstrated for “a few minutes” but were then arrested by Chinese armed security forcesl; when this news reached
Rong Gonchen monastery, 80 monks marched to the county market and called for the release of the 22 monks arrested that morning; laypeople joined the monks’ demonstration, which became “large and very loud”.

Additional security personnel arrived; the situation became “extremely tense”. Former chief of Rong Gonchen monastery, 80-year-old Alak Khasutsang, arrived to intervene in an attempt to diffuse the tension, but the Chinese security forces started to severely beat every one at the scene irrespective of age or status. Over 80 Tibetans, including monks and lay people, were arrested and taken to the County PSB detention centre.

Chinese security forces have been deployed at Rong Gonchen monastery, prohibiting visitors as well as restricting monks from leaving.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 April 2008)

At 11 am, around 22 monks from Rebgong monastery were arrested after they demonstrated for the release of three monks arrested on 13 April for their involvement in protests held on 17 March. Hearing about the arrest of the 22 monks, another group of 80 monks “followed the protest”, and were joined by local people. Alag Khatso-tsang, an eighty-year-old former abbot of Rongpo monastery, tried to calm the situation down and was badly beaten and injured by PLA personnel. A further 140 people including monks and laypeople were detained. The monastery [presumably Rongpo monastery] was put under tight surveillance; nobody was allowed in or out.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

Between 17 and 21 April, over 430 monks and laypeople were arrested in Rebkong county and initially detained in the county prison; their subsequent whereabouts is unknown. Security forces began conducting searches at the smaller monasteries near Rongpo Gonchen monastery.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

Rongpo Gonchen monastery and surrounding area under tight restrictions; numerous monks from Rongpo monastery were arrested, but some, including Tenzin Chophel (a spiritual teacher at the monastery) were released. Border Security Forces from Hunan [possibly Chongqing Garrison District] continue to impose tight restrictions in the county.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

Following the arrest over one hundred Tibetans including monks in Rebkong county market town on 17 April, “scores of Chinese armed security forces raided monks’ houses” in Rong Gonchen monastery at around 6 pm; “a dozen of the Chinese security forces in full combat gear were armed with guns”; the monks were “forcibly flushed out” to the monastery’s courtyard and were made to kneel down with hands behind their heads. The monks were threatened at gunpoint and photos of the Dalai Lama found in the monks’ rooms were seized.

Alak Khasutsang, the 80-year-old former chief of Rong Gonchen monastery who tried to diffuse the tension between the Tibetan demonstrators and the Chinese security forces on 17 April, has reportedly sustained a severe head injury during the police crackdown. He is believed to be in a critical condition; one source reported that he had been taken to a hospital in Siling (Chin. Xining) city for treatment although this has not been confirmed. He was also known to be suffering from high blood pressure [unclear if this is an ongoing medical condition or if as a result of the events on 17-18 April].

Geshe Tenzin Choephel, a 50-year-old monk from Siling (Chin. Xining) city and a teacher of Qinghai University for Nationalities, was at Rong Gonchen monastery at the time of raid; he is known to have been arrested although for “unknown reason[s]”. His whereabouts remains unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 18 April 2008)

Armed police raided Longwu (Longwusi/Rongwu) monastery and seized audio-visual discs and pictures of the Dalai Lama, and detained around 200 monks – four fifths of the monastery’s inhabitants – as well as dozens of local laypeople, some of whom had tried to prevent police from detaining the monks.
(reported by Reuters, 18 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Among those arrested on 17 April was Alag Khatso-tsang, eighty-year-old former abbot of Rongpo Gonchen monastery. Alag Khatso-tsang was severely beaten, resulting in a head injury and three broken ribs; the security forces stated that he would be taken to hospital but his whereabouts is unknown.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

At 11am, twenty monks demonstrated at Rongwo monastery, demanding the release of the three monks arrested on 13 April [see entry for Tibet Watch, Rebkong, 12 April 2008]. Nineteen trucks of armed police arrived; all protesters arrested. An estimated eighty monks then protested at these arrests; laypeople joined the protest; an eighty-year-old lama named Alak Khaso stepped in to persuade the protesters to disperse. All the protesters were “cracked down upon harshly and beaten”; more than 140 arrests including Alak Khaso. Armed police surrounded the monastery; no-one allowed to enter or leave. In the evening, ten to fifteen soldiers checked the monks’ quarters; confiscated Dalai Lama photographs. Some soldiers had guns, others had electric batons. Monks were arrested; numbers unclear.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Date unspecified, apparently between 26 March and 17 April 2008: Monks were told to repent and apologise for their involvement in anti-China protests and to fly the Chinese flag; they refused.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

Date unspecified, circa 17 April: Several Chinese residents said all temples in Kardze [unclear whether town, county or prefecture] were now flying Chinese flags; a resident told RFA’s Mandarin service, “There are national flags everywhere”.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong)

Date unspecified, apparently between 26 March and 17 April 2008: Armed police sent to Nyagrong [Nyarong] town after residents refused to condemn the Dalai Lama.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Shiwa Lhathim monastery, Raloong township, Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong xian)

Date unspecified, apparently between 26 March and 17 April 2008: Monks at Shiwa [Shiwa Lhathim] monastery in Nyagrong [Nyarong] have begun flying Chinese flags at the monastery [see also Nyagrong, 17 April 2008; RFA, 17/04/08].
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Jiarima, Ngaba (Chin: Aba) county

Nyichung, a Tibetan woman arrested on 18 March following 16-17 March protests in Jiarima township and released on 26 March with severe injuries caused by torture, died on 17 April. Following her release from detention, her family had been told by the local authorities that she did not have permission to receive medical treatment in hospital, and her condition grew increasingly worse. After her death, the family invited monks to pray, but the local authority did not allow this.
Nyichung was aged around 38; the mother of four children.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A 38 year-old woman named Nechung, from Charu Hu village in Ngaba county, died after being subjected to brutal torture by guards in a Chinese prison. She was the mother of four children.

Nechung had been involved in peaceful protests on 16 and 17 March 2008 in Ngaba county. On 18 March she was arrested for allegedly being “the first person to pull down the door plate of the Township office”. She spent nine days in custody and was released on 26 March. At the time of her release, her health was in an extremely critical condition. TCHRD reported: "There were many bruise marks on her body, she was unable to speak and eat food, constantly vomiting and could hardly breathe properly.

Relatives took her to the county government hospital, but she was refused treatment, “apparently under influence and intimidation of the local Chinese authorities”. After remaining in a critical condition for 22 days without medical treatment, she died on 17 April. Even after her death, “the Chinese authorities issued [a] terse warning to Tibetan monks for offering prayers and ritual rites for her deceased soul”.

Nechung is survived by her four children, all minors. Her husband has been on the run since her arrest, apparently to avoid being arrested by the Chinese security forces.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Eight young monks from Nalanda monastery were arrested in a very aggressive manner by the security forces. One was identified as Nyima Tenzin, from Chukha Jang village in Phenpo Lhundrup county. He was severely beaten by security forces; his spine was broken but received no proper medical attention; he was fined a sum of 5,000 yuan.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Ramoche temple, Lhasa

Date unspecified (between mid March and mid April): Two monks from Ramoche temple died while on hunger strike.
(reported by sources to TibetInfoNet, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Tenkhang monastery, Damshung county (Chin: Dangxiong xian)

A group of monks from Tenkhang monastery (a branch of Takloong monastery) held a protest on either 17 or 18 March; all were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Yang-ngae village, Rawa township, Sog county (Chin: Suo xian)

A ‘patriotic re-education’ session was held in Yang-ngae village. A 52-year-old man named Chambu Gudup from Yonag village spoke out against the Chinese government during the class and was arrested by the police.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Wednesday, 16 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Shitsang monastery (Chin: Xicang), Luchu county (Chin:Luqu xian)

At 2am, security forces raided Shi-tsang Gatsel monastery; stamped on Dalai Lama portraits; four monks were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Palyul monastery, Palyul (Chin: Baiyu), Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county

A group of police including some Tibetans came to Palyul monastery [understood to be in Palyul county, Kardze TAP] and “searched everywhere”; they found a photo of the Dalai Lama and took it away. The “Chinese authorities including county authorities” [RFA’s quotation of a source] insisted that the monastery fly the Chinese national flag on top of the main temple; the monastery refused.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Thoesam, a senior monk from Ngaba monastery, committed suicide. He was born in Mehu-ru-mah village, Ngaba county, was 29 years old, and had very poor vision. He had recently told a close relative that he could not bear seeing such repression being imposed on Tibetan people.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Ratoe monastery, Chushur county (Chin: Chushui xian)

Following a peaceful demonstration in Nyethang township on 14 March 2008 led by monks of Ratoe monastery, Chinese authorities “later” [date and time unspecified by TCHRD, but presumably on 14 March] went to Ratoe monastery and stepped up intense political and ‘patriotic re-education’ campaigns [see entry for Nyethang township, Chushul county, 14 March].
At 4.30 am on 16 April 2008, hundreds of Chinese security personnel – PSB and PAP – surrounded Ratoe monastery before raiding the monks’ residences in search of “weapons and other incriminating materials”. No weapons were found, but Dalai Lama photographs and mobile phones were confiscated. Fifty monks were arrested for taking part in the peaceful protest of 14 March, and detained in Chushul PSB Detention Centre; 18 have since been released; 32 monks, mostly in their early twenties, remain in detention; they have been “denied total visitation rights” [presumably “completely denied” as apposed to “partially denied”] and there is no information available about their present condition.
One of those arrested is Namkar, a 45-year-old former political prisoner who had previously served two years imprisonment in Drapchi Prison, Lhasa for taking part in pro-independence demonstrations in 1989.
A 38-year-old monk named Thupchok was also arrested; he was a prominent Democratic Management Committee (DMC) ‘work team’ member in Ratoe monastery, who had been responsible for implementing the controversial and much resented ‘patriotic education’ campaign at Ratoe.
The situation at Ratoe monastery, home to around 90 monks, is currently “calm and restricted”.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 May 2008)

At approximately 4am, large numbers of PAP personnel surrounded Ratoe monastery; monks were summoned to the monastery courtyard and told to give up any arms they may have. The monastery was searched; portraits of the Dalai Lama, political books and materials, and mobile phones belonging to 70 monks were confiscated along with the monastery’s main telephone. Fifty monks were arrested and taken to Chushur county prison where they were severely beaten. Eighteen were released and 32 remained in detention, including Thupchok, the head of the monastery, and Namkar, a former political prisoner who previously spent over three years in Drapchi prison. Most of the 32 still in detention were from Chushur county, while others are from Drakyab, Lhoka and Toelung counties.
Monks at Ratoe monastery were then forced to attend patriotic re-education classes.
(reported by CTA, 09 May 2008)

  Tuesday, 15 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Labrang eyewitness account: Jamyang Jinpa, a monk from Sangkhog nomadic township, was arrested from his room at Labrang monastery at around 1am by 12 police armed with machine guns who broke in through the windows. Searched every corner of the room. They left an elderly monk who was staying in the room as a visitor’ but said of Jamyang Jinpa: “He is a pro-separatist criminal who violated governmental constitution, and he had personal involvement in the illegal protest in Labrang on 14 March. We must punish him if he is against the governmental constitution”.
“Chinese military soldiers” searched the monks’ rooms; many pictures of the Dalai Lama confiscated; antique statues taken from the monastery.
[Jamyang Jinpa: see also Labrang, 22 April 2008; Tibet Watch 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

During the night of 14-15 April, over 200 monks were arrested from Labrang Tashi-Kyil monastery during a search conducted by the various security organs. On 15 April, a large group of monks from the monastery demanded the release of those detained, with threat of further protest; all were released except three monks who remain in detention for their alleged involvement in protests before foreign journalists on 9 April.
(reported by CTA, 16 April 2008)

Between 150 and 160 monks from Labrang monastery arrested, reportedly by PAP officials from the Lanzhou Security Bureau. Large numbers of Chinese police and soldiers arrived late in the evening; searched the monastery for Dalai Lama photographs; those found were “torn, broken and thrown away” (children on their way to school the next day reportedly collected fragments of the photographs). The authorities looted valuable statues, prompting Geshe Akhu Jamyang Gyatso to complain to the central government – those he spoke to blamed high ranking officers of Kanlho TAP and took no “further” action. Police and soldiers completely surrounded the monastery; no-one was allowed to enter or leave.
Of those arrested, the following names have been reported:

  1. Nyima Konchok Nagdo from Thoesam Ling college of Labrang monastery.
  2. Samdrub Yalo from Ngulra.
  3. Tsondue from Gengya.
  4. Dzampa La from Gyutoe college of Labrang.
  5. Sage from Kyedor college.
  6. Palden from Doekhor college.
  7. Lushoe Tenzin from Gyurme college.
  8. Rebkong Gedun Nagdang.
  9. Jamyang Jinpa from Sangkhok.

They have been accused by the Chinese government of initiating the protest in Labrang and reportedly been brutally treated. Lushoe Tenzin, Rebkong Gedun Nagdang and Sangkhok Jamyang Jinpa reportedly taken to “an unknown hospital and their whereabouts unknown”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

Police staged a late-night raid on monks’ quarters; a group of monks were arrested, including three monks from Gyume monastery (a branch of Labrang Tashi-kyil monastery):

  1. Lu Shoepa Tenzin.
  2. Reptsa Gedun Nagdag.
  3. Sangkhog Jamyang Jinpa.

All three were “severely injured by the police” and admitted to “an unknown hospital”.
(reported by CTA, 02 May 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

13 monks from Labrang Tashi Kyil [Labrang Tashikyil] monastery [of over 200 arrested during the night of 14-15 April] continue to be detained. They are believed to be the monks who spoke to Western media [on 9 April 2008].
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

Labrang eyewitness account: “People said there were around 70 trucks of military soldiers stationed in Sangchu County on 15 April. I only saw the streets were full of armed personnel, with no monks or pilgrims in Labrang monastery” [note: the eyewitness was staying in Labrang monastery and described what he saw there and in the adjacent streets].
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Shitsang monastery (Chin: Xicang), Luchu county (Chin:Luqu xian)

During the evening of 15 April, security forces arrived at Shi-tsang Gatsel monastery and arrested 28 monks.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

Monks returned to the detention centre to visit the three detained on 13 March [see entry for Tibet Watch, Rebkong, 12 April 2008]; however, the monks had been removed; officials refused to answer questions concerning their whereabouts. Monks gathered in Rongwo monastery, angered by the false reassurances of the government and discussed how they should react. The monastery was reportedly surrounded by “army personnel with guns”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » [Ngaba TAP]

Date unspecified; circa mid April: There have been reports of prisoners being starved.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Two monks, Tengpa Gyatso and Gyapa Dondrup, allegedly incited four other monks to bomb a local resident’s home.
[Notes: Xinhua did not provide any further details about the incident, except that on 12 May “police arrested monks who were accused of involvement” (see Markham county, 12 May 2008; Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008). Chinaview (Xinhuanet) 05/06/08 did not state to which monastery the monks belonged, but Reuters 05/06/08 referred to a different Xinhua report which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery; an article by Josephine Ma in the South China Morning Post (publication date unknown) also referred to a Xinhua report which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery. There were no reported casualties caused by the alleged bombing and no explanation given as to why the incident was not reported until more than seven weeks later. Referring to Xinhua, Reuters and the South China Morning Post were also more specific in stating that the target was a Tibetan home; Reuters included the detail that it was “the home of a Tibetan farmer”.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Gaden Choekhor monastery, Gaden Choekhor (Ganden Chungkor/Phenpo township), Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi xian)

Date unspecified: There have been continued arrests at Gadhen Choekhor [Ganden Choekor] monastery.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

A “very strong protest on 14-15 April” in Phenpo Lhundup [Phenpo Lhundrup] county; about 250 people were arrested; a few were released after being “tortured and injured”; “on many occasions, several people including both monks and lay people have been brutally tortured and beaten” [in Phenpo Lhundrup county]. Due to lack of space in the county prison, those arrested are being held in the assembly hall [understood to be the assembly hall of Shar Bumpa (Bhumpa) nunnery].
[Additional note: It is possible that the “14-15 April” date of protests may be an error, as protests had occurred in Phenpo Lhundrup county on 14-15 March.]
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

A few more monks from Sera monastery were arrested “on Tuesday”.
[Note: Tuesday is assumed to be 15 April 2008, two days before CTA reported this incident. However, this information immediately followed details of monks being arrested from Ganden monastery “on Wednesday in the beginning of April”; therefore, the arrest of the Sera monks described here may have occurred on Tuesday 1 April 2008.]
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Monday, 14 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Choephel Tashi Chokor-ling monastery, Dokhor town, Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni xian)

During a raid on Choephel Tashi Chokor-ling monastery, members of the security forces stamped on portraits of the Dalai Lama.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu (Chin: Maqu), Machu county (Chin: Maqu xian)

Approximate date: “At the same time” as Lodoe Wangpo was arrested in Lanzhou, the authorities “sealed off” the private school he had set up, Shide Gyamtso, located within Machu county secondary school. The ‘crimes’ cited when the school was “sealed off” were:

  1. Lodoe Wangpo’s [alleged] organising of the 17 March [Machu] protests.
  2. The “education system in his institution” being “directly related” to the Dalai Lama.
  3. His production of video footage and photos of the protests since 10 March, to send to people outside Tibet.
  4. Lodoe Wangpo brought “trouble and conflict to the harmonious society existing between Tibetans and Chinese”.

The school has not been allowed to re-open since being sealed off in April.
[See also Lanzhou, 14 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08; and Lanzhou, 26 May 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Ngok-Gyalmo monastery, Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

Security personnel arrived at Ngok-Gyalmo monastery to search for participants of protests held on 16 March; the monks’ quarters were searched. Some monks mocked the Chinese authorities by shouting: “I am the one”. Nine monks were arrested and taken away.
(reported by CTA, 16 April 2008)

  Outside Tibetan Regions » Lanzhou, Gansu Province

Chinese authorities in Lanzhou arrested a Tibetan man, Lodoe Wangpo, charging him with “organising the peaceful protests on 17 March” and producing video footage and photos of “the protests” to send to people outside Tibet.
[Note: Tibet Watch does not actually specify which 17 March protests, but the location is clearly Machu town since the report goes on to describe Lodoe Wangpo’s connections with Machu county. Nonetheless, it is assumed that the reader is aware of the details. In fact, demonstrations occurred in almost twenty locations on 17 March 2008, including Machu.]
Lodoe Wangpo had moved to Lanzhou “following pressure by the authorities” in Machu county [details and date not provided]. He was arrested during the middle of the night by Kanlho prefecture police, whilst staying in a Chinese friend’s home [it is unclear why he was arrested by Kanlho TAP police and not by Lanzhou police]. Two unidentified people were arrested with him [the same Tibet Watch report later states that one of those arrested was his Chinese friend, but that he was released on the same day; there was no further mention of the third individual].
[See also Machu, 14 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

Unrest between monks and the Democratic Management Committee; the “normal” [daily?] chanting assembly was not held; most monks reportedly swore in front of the “Dharma Protective gods” that they would stand up for anyone arrested or beaten by the authorities.
Some monks visited and took food to those detained on the previous day [see Rebkong, 12 April 2008; Tibet Watch]; their health was reportedly normal. Apparently around one hundred Tibetans imprisoned, all of them arrested following the “demonstrations on 21 February” [see comments, Tibet Watch Rebkong entries, 4 and 10 March 2008].
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding), Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) county

A demonstration was held at the Dartsedo county office in Dartsedo town. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Zungchu county (Chin: Songpan xian)

Date unspecified; presumed April 2008: A boy from Tsongdu [presumed to be Zongchu] county was injured and taken to a hospital in Barkham county by an aide; their whereabouts are unknown. [CTA does not state the cause of the injury or whether or not it was related to protest or oppression.]
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Monks and lay people held a peaceful demonstration, that was suppressed by “a great number of military police”. No casualties or injuries are known so far.
(reported by Woeser blog/chinadigitaltimes, 16 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Internal announcements suggest that the military presence in Lhasa is to increase during forthcoming weeks; military personnel to be deployed in areas that the PSB personnel are normally responsible for. Most of the local PSB are Tibetans; therefore these developments illustrate the authorities’ lack of trust in them.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

Date unspecified: In many Tibetan areas, including Lhasa, groups of Chinese have exacerbated ethnic tensions. Some Chinese vegetable-sellers demanded higher prices from Tibetans than from Chinese customers. Fights broke out between Tibetan and Chinese students at Lhasa middle school. In one instance, after a fight between two students, two Chinese parents beat up a Tibetan student; the authorities’ reaction to this incident led to a larger clash between groups of Tibetans and Chinese, which was stopped by the PAP. Students from various schools in Lhasa began fundraising activities to help those who suffered losses during the recent demonstrations; funds were also being raised from fellow students [CTA did not specify whether the students involved in fundraising were Tibetan or Chinese].
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

ICT reported that raids on people’s houses and ‘disappearances’ and intimidation are continuing every day; someone has disappeared from almost every Tibetan household since 14 March; a source told ICT that people are sleeping in their clothes “in case of a knock on the door in the middle of the night”.

More than 800 people were locked inside a large warehouse area at Lhasa railway station where many of them were beaten severely and deprived of food. A group of several hundred Tibetans were seen to be herded onto a train by armed police at Lhasa station, reportedly bound for Qinghai Province; the group included monks, many without shoes [see also entry for Siling (Chin. Xining), Qinghai Province, Monday 7 April].

A young monk who was detained in Lhasa for having no identity card was taken to a local detention centre and severely beaten by four men at the same time, every day over a period of several days. A source reported that, “During the torture, he had no comprehension of night and day. With one arm up over behind the neck and the other under and behind the back, they tied his wrists together behind his back. The food at the prison consisted of one small bread roll per person and about 20 ounces of water that was shared between four to five people. People were sleeping in the area where they went to the toilet and they were not allowed to wear shoes”.

The source quoted here was taken from Lhasa to Mianyang Prison in Sichuan Province during week commencing 7 April, but was subsequently released “due to fears that he might die if he remained without medical attention”. He can now hardly walk or talk and his breathing is labored. The same source said that there were many Tibetans from Lhasa in Mianyang Prison.

At neighborhood committee meetings, Lhasa citizens are warned to report that everything is fine if they receive calls from outside Tibet. Some Tibetans reportedly detained for speaking on the phone to relatives in exile. Some Tibetans detained after 14 March are known to have been released; some “are believed to have been detained while they were shopping for groceries”; others detained “simply for being found or living in Tibetan areas of Lhasa”.

Serious concerns of a humanitarian crisis in Lhasa’s monasteries; food and water supplies are running low and monks prevented from leaving; the city’s major monasteries, Drepung, Sera, and Ganden, have been under lockdown and sealed off since 10 March. The restrictions on movement in the city mean that many families are also suffering from difficulties in obtaining food.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

Circa 14 April: Officials reportedly showed photographs of recent Tibetan demonstrations outside the Chinese consulate in New York City, to Tibetans in Lhasa with relatives in exile; upon recognition of relatives, the Lhasa residents were given a warning that to avoid difficulties, they must tell their relatives to stop demonstrating.
(reported by sources to TibetInfoNet, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

A “very strong protest on 14-15 April” in Phenpo Lhundup [Phenpo Lhundrup] county [see also Phenpo Lhundrup county, 15 April 2008; CTA, 17/04/08].
[Additional note: It is possible that the “14-15 April” date of protests may be an error, as protests had occurred in Phenpo Lhundrup county on 14-15 March.]
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

Demonstrations.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Sera monastery, Lhasa

Monks from Sera are not even permitted to fetch water from outside the gate of the monastery.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

  Yunnan Province » Dechen TAP (Chin: Deqin) » Dechen county (Chin: Diqing Xian)

Tourism “fell off a cliff” in most of the “Tibetan-inhabited areas and in Tibet as a result of riots in Lhasa and elsewhere”. Because the “safety of tourists was uncertain”, travel services were “advised to postpone” organising group tours to “Tibetan-inhabited areas, including Diqing [Tib: Dechen]”. Due to a lack of customers, a local Tibetan farmer-turned taxi driver had to live off his savings during March in order to support his family. During the first few days of April 2008, “fewer overseas tourists could be seen” compared to previous years. However, overseas tourists have been “crowding to this southwest Chinese Tibetan area” since Thursday 10 April when the prefectural authorities announced it would re-open to foreigners. Xinhua claims that Hutiao Gorge in Diqing [Tib: Dechen] TAP received 2,700 tourists between 11 and 14 April, of whom 300 were from overseas.
(reported by sources to Xinhua/China Daily, 16 April 2008)

  Sunday, 13 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Many of the monks and laypeople that had been arrested in Ngaba county were taken to a prison near Chengdu.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gyanbe township, Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

China has detained nine Buddhist monks from Tongxia monastery and accused them of planting a homemade bomb on 23 March in a government office building. According to Xinhua, the monks later confessed to planting the explosive. There were no reported deaths or damage caused by the alleged explosion. An official with the local Gongjue county PSB confirmed the report and said six monks had been detained for planting the bomb and three for shielding the suspects and covering up their crimes. Xinhua did not explain why the alleged explosion was not reported earlier [Note: a similar incident in Gonjo county – presumably the same incident – was reported by RFA on 2 April 2008]. To date, no other bombing incidents have been reported [by the Chinese media] during the post-10 March era of anti-government protests.
(reported by AP, 13 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Chinese authorities have put out a ‘wanted’ list naming a total 143 people suspected of involvement in the [14 March] riots, many of them monks.
(reported by Reuters, 13 April 2008)

  Saturday, 12 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Labrang eyewitness account: Since 12 April, the “Chinese authority” [unclear whether police, PAP, PSB, PLA] began searching monks’ living quarters, but did not search residences of “incarnation lamas” [tulkus]. Many Dalai Lama portraits and Tibetan flags confiscated.
The “local Chinese authority” started a ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign after a week [presumably one week after 12 April], conducted by different staff on each day, but at least ten armed policemen and “another five police” [presumably unarmed police] watched over monks in “the” class; each class “lasted for two hours a week”.
[Dates unclear:] The ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign staff ordered the monastery’s Democratic Management Committee to instruct the monks to sign papers denouncing the Dalai Lama and Tibetan government in exile as separatists; the monks refused; then “after two or three days, campaigners [the staff conducting the ‘patriotic re-education campaign’] announced that monks had to sign up [sign denunciations] in the morning after they assembled in class”. However, this was “a trick to check who was absent from patriotic re-education class” [i.e. the prior announcement was expected to lead to absences].
However, “many monks worried about the signatures in class every morning. They did not know how the Chinese authority would use their signatures” [note: this implies that the classes were daily; earlier the eyewitness had remarked: “Each class lasted for two hours a week”.]
[Note: this information came from an eyewitness account made by a visitor at Labrang monastery, who was staying in one of the monks’ quarters prior to 14 March 2008 and at least through April; but it is not clear exactly when the statement was made and when the visitor left Labrang. He stated that the ‘patriotic re-education’ classes were conducted “since 12 April”, but there is not indication of when they were completed, or if they were still taking place when the visitor left Labrang.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe xian)

On 12-13 April, cadres from prefecture and county level began conducting ‘patriotic re-education’ classes.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongpo Gonchen monastery, Rebgong county (Chin: Tongren Xian)

Special police units wearing black uniforms arrived at Rongpo Gonchen monastery; they beat [an unspecified number of] monks and arrested three of them.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Rongwu monastery, Rebkong county (Ch. Tongren Xian)

County PSB officials ordered Rongwo monastery to hand over three monks for interrogation, accused of having “masterminded the protests on 21 February”:

  1. Lobsang Dhondup, aged 20, from the Buddhist Dialectics College.
  2. Drakpa, aged 28, from the Tantric College.
  3. Lobsang Dhondup, aged 30, from the Tantric College.

The PSB officials pressured Rebkong Kyabgon Rinpoche to hand over them over, or else all the monks would be arrested. The officials promised that the three monks would be released after three days, be treated as normal, allowed visits by family, and allowed mobile phones; the monastery was forced to accept the order. The following day (13 April), under the envoy of the Rongwo Monastery Democratic Management Committee, the three monks were detained; sent for interrogation in Rebkong. The Democratic Management Committee reportedly “did not inform the monks of these facts” [unclear whether referring to the three monks detained or all other monks; the “facts” presumably relates to the promises made].
[Note: Tibet Watch’s account of 21 February referred to clashes with police and rioting caused by frustration with the authorities’ recent tightening of restrictions in the region. This source did not report the occurrence on 21 February of protests, typically characterised by slogans and political demands. The incidents of 21 February appear to have been spontaneous, rather than premeditated, i.e. “masterminded”, as alleged by the PSB.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

At a meeting in Dartsedo, Chinese authorities instructed a gathering of monks to fly the Chinese flag on every monastery in Kardze prefecture. “All […] monks and nuns […] were told to participate in the campaign. The monks were told to sign criticisms of the exile Tibetan government, the Dalai Lama, and the protests […]”; “the monks and nuns should pledge under the flag to applaud China, hold the Dalai Lama and the exile government responsible for the unrest in different parts of Tibetan areas, and recognise the Dalai Lama as a separatist”; many of the monks refused.
[Note: details are muddled regarding what occurred at the meeting in Dartsedo and what subsequently happened at the monasteries when the instructions given at the meeting were attempted to be implemented.]
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

All county officials and monastery heads from Kardze TAP were summoned to Dartsedo (Chin: Kangding) for a meeting to “enforce guidance” for conducting ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. In various counties during March, including Sershul county, many monasteries had rejected ‘patriotic re-education’ and in some monasteries, monks called for dialogue between China and the Dalai Lama. At the Dartsedo meeting, the authorities demanded that: the heads of monasteries acknowledge that demands for such dialogue were a “big mistake”; and that the Chinese flag is flown on each monastery’s rooftops.
The monks and laypeople of Sershul county were also required to acknowledge that the Dalai Lama was responsible for inciting the recent demonstrations, and “were made to promise” [presumably “would be made to promise” considering that the meeting was attended by county officials and monastery heads, not “monks and laypeople”] that they would protest against the ‘Dalai clique’.
The authorities’ demands were met with much resentment from the Tibetan people; due to the “failed outcome” of the meeting, the authorities scheduled another meeting.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

The heads of monasteries from 18 counties in Kardze TAP were summoned to Dartsedo for a meeting to “enforce guidance” for conducting patriotic re-education classes. Three head lamas stated that if the authorities had any concern for the Tibetan public, ‘patriotic re-education’ classes should be stopped immediately; otherwise, Tibetans would lose patience and the situation would become “unfavourable”, for which the monastery heads would not be able to bear responsibility. The heads of monasteries unanimously condemned the ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign, forcing the Chinese authorities to temporarily suspend the “anti-Dalai clique” signature campaign. However, troops deployed at various monasteries were still not withdrawn; additional military personnel dressed in civilian clothes began patrolling the monastery compounds on a daily basis.
(reported by CTA, 21 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Date unspecified; circa 12 April: Monks of Thang-kya monastery protested; demanded the release of three monks arrested on 1 April; called for freedom of speech and religion, and Tibetan independence. A group of monks were arrested; taken to the county market in a police truck; displayed to intimidate other Tibetans who were told that they too would be punished for participating in protests. The monks remain in detention. The authorities completely surrounded Thang-kya monastery and imposed tight restrictions.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Cholung nunnery, Meldrogongkar county (Chinese: Mozhu Gongka Xian)

Following demonstrations in Medrogongkar that were suppressed by military police, leading to several dozen arrests, that night, a 31-year-old nun named Lobsang Tsomo from Cholung nunnery hanged herself.
(reported by Woeser blog/chinadigitaltimes, 23 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

Following the arrival of additional military personnel at Drepung on 10 April, more ‘work teams’ were brought in to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. On 11 and/or 12 April, the monks protested against the ‘patriotic re-education’ classes and many were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

Weekend of 12-13 April: more troops deployed at Drepung following unrest over the past few days following the arrival of a ‘patriotic education’ team at the monastery last week; unrest at Drepung over the weekend may also have been linked to armed troops preventing monks from attempting to leave the monastery to obtain food. A source said, “The news has spread to the entire Lhasa city, thus, all the Tibetans are heartsick now”. A number of monks from Drepung were detained at the weekend.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

Several monks from Drepung monastery were arrested on or around 12 April.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

The PAP personnel and ‘work teams’ deployed in Drepung monastery on 10 April to conduct intensive ‘patriotic re-education’ were met by protest; many monks arrested on 11 and 12 April; their whereabouts unknown.
One name confirmed: Phuntsok Nyingpo, born in Toelung Dechen (Chin: Duilongdeqing county, Lhasa Municipality.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

Xinhua: “A law education work group is now in the Drepung Monastery in Lhasa to restore religious order after violence involving lamas ravaged the city last month. Similar work groups have also been sent to some other monasteries, to help maintain social stability, socialist legal institutions, the public’s fundamental interest and normal order of Buddhist activities”. With “the understanding and support of monks and religious followers”, the ‘work groups’, which “stick to government policies toward ethnic minorities and religion while carrying out their work in accordance with the law”, have “made smooth progress” in strengthening “publicity and education about the country’s legal system in the monasteries”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet) and Xinhua/People's Daily, 12 April 2008)

Circa 12 April: TAR authorities sent the Legal Information Education ‘work team’ to Drepung monastery as part of a ‘patriotic education’ campaign. The new Legal Information Education campaign is aimed at informing the monastic institution about the legal and other consequences of taking part in political activities. The monks protested against the ‘patriotic education’ campaign; security forces were called in to control the monks, and a number of them were immediately detained; their whereabouts remains unknown. All roads leading towards Drepung monastery have been sealed off and additional armed police forces deployed; the movement of the monks is severely restricted; outside visitors to the monastery including religious devotees are prohibited from visiting the monastery.
(reported by TCHRD, 14 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

There are reports that since the start of demonstrations in March, groups of Chinese people have entered Tibetan residential complexes and beaten Tibetans. The exact location and date of such incidents was not confirmed. Chinese people are also known to have passed on information about protestors to the police.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Maldrogongkar county (Chin: Mozhugongka xian)

Twelve monks from Pangsa and Droma monasteries, nuns from Cholung nunnery and villagers from Medrogongkar held a protest against the ‘Patriotic Education Campaign’ carried out by the authorities; shouted pro-Dalai Lama and Tibetan independence slogans; the protestors were suppressed by the local military police; several dozen people were arrested and many were severely injured.

That night, a 31-year-old nun named Lobsang Tsomo from Cholung nunnery hanged herself.
(reported by Woeser blog/chinadigitaltimes, 23 April 2008)

A peaceful protest in Meldro Gungkar [Maldrogongkar] county was led by monks from Pangsa monastery, nuns from Choekhor nunnery, and monks from Dhomo monastery led a peaceful protest. They were joined by laypeople; numerous monks and laypeople were arrested. After the protest, a 21-year-old nun from Choekhor nunnery committed suicide.
(reported by CTA, 26 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Tibet University, Lhasa

Since 10 March, Tibet University has been under tight scrutiny with regular roll-calls of people living on campus. Chinese media has announced that there have been no cases of death, injury or disappearance of Tibet University students or staff, implying that students and staff were in no way involved in the uprising on 14 March 2008. However, CTA states, it has been noted by some “higher authorities” that up to 100 people from the university, both students and staff, were in fact involved in the uprising. Following these findings, [Tibet University] suspended one senior staff member and further strengthened its [political] “education” campaign, which includes the condemnation of students who graduated from Tibet University about 20 years previously and who are currently working with CTA in Dharamsala; current students are repeatedly advised to refrain from such “acts of ingratitude”.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Friday, 11 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu Xian)

Date unspecified; reported 11 April: In each town in Sershul county, ten military personnel and 70 local forces have been deployed to restrict people’s movement; contingency plans have been made for possible incidents which may require more military forces.
(reported by CTA, 11 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Dzigar monastery, Jomda (Chin: Jiangda) county

Officials and police arrived at Dzigar monastery to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’; Dzigar is one of three monasteries in Jomda county (from a total of 62) which have been pressed into “re-education campaigns” aimed at eliciting condemnations of the Dalai Lama.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Date unspecified; circa 11 April: Chinese authorities investigated the backgrounds of each family [throughout Markham county?], after which certain individuals were called upon to serve the local forces.
(reported by CTA, 11 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Sungda monastery, Jomda (Chin: Jiangda) county

Date unclear, possibly circa 11 April 2008: Sungda is one of three monasteries in Jomda county (from a total of 62) which have been pressed into “re-education campaigns” aimed at eliciting condemnations of the Dalai Lama; however, monks at Sungda monastery refused to take part in ‘patriotic re-education’; not known if they have suffered any consequences.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Wara monastery, Jomda county (Chin: Jiangda Xian)

Date unclear, possibly circa 11 April 2008: Wara is one of three monasteries in Jomda county (from a total of 62) which have been pressed into “re-education campaigns” aimed at eliciting condemnations of the Dalai Lama; however, monks at Wara monastery refused to take part in ‘patriotic re-education’; not known if they have suffered any consequences.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

Lhasa “swirling” with rumours that security forces clashed with monks on 11 April; all roads leading to Drepung have been blocked; no one at the monastery or the local police station could be reached for comment.
(reported by Reuters, 13 April 2008)

Following the arrival of additional military personnel at Drepung on 10 April, more ‘work teams’ were brought in to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. On 11 and/or 12 April, the monks protested against the ‘patriotic re-education’ classes and many were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

The road to Drepung monastery was closed again.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

The PAP personnel and ‘work teams’ deployed in Drepung monastery on 10 April to conduct intensive ‘patriotic re-education’ were met by protest; many monks arrested on 11 and 12 April; their whereabouts unknown.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Tight restrictions continue to be imposed in monasteries and religious centres, such as Tsuglag-khang (Jokhang) temple. All monks remain confined to their monastery compounds; laypeople are prohibited from visiting the monasteries. Monks in charge of the monasteries’ food supplies are forced to wear civilian dress when shopping for food; they remain under constant surveillance when leaving the monastery compounds.
(reported by CTA, 11 April 2008)

  Thursday, 10 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu (Chin: Maqu), Machu county (Chin: Maqu xian)

Circa Thursday 10 April: After visiting Labrang, a group of 20 Chinese and foreign journalists on a state-organised media tour were escorted to Machu; one of them reported seeing only one uniformed policeman in the town – a traffic policeman. There was a “very obvious plain clothes presence”, and there was “clearly an atmosphere of fear and tension among all ethnicities in the area”.
(reported by ICT, 16 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Not a single monk from the eleven monasteries around the town was seen on the streets; shopkeepers confirm that the streets used to be full of monks; passers-by did not answer when visiting journalists asked the whereabouts of the monks. Journalists discovered that the monks are under ‘house arrest’ in their monasteries, where they are to be submitted to political education until October.
A journalist asked a shopkeeper how police had repressed the demonstration on 16 March, but the shopkeeper left without answering. People are unwilling to explain how the demonstration and violence erupted; one man said, “I can tell you what happened here”, but then said “sorry” in English and disappeared as a passer-by approached. This incident was typical of the experiences of all journalists on the [government controlled] trip.

(reported by Die Welt, 11 April 2008)

At a monastery located 55km away from Machu town, a local ‘living Buddha’ reported that none of his 225 monks participated in the protests of 16 March. However, some of the monks reported that three of them were detained for participating in the protests; two were subsequently released.
(reported by Die Welt, 11 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Drepung monastery, Lhasa

Additional PAP personnel and ‘work teams’ were deployed in Drepung monastery to conduct intensive ‘patriotic re-education’.
(reported by CTA, 27 June 2008)

During the evening, additional military personnel were brought in to Drepung monastery “for further suppression”.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

A number of military vehicles were seen moving towards Drepung monastery.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The 19th ‘most wanted’ list, bringing the total to 111 Tibetans (including 6 male and one female), was issued by the TAR PSB, and broadcasted in both Tibetan and Chinese languages by the Literature and Art Channel of the Tibet and Lhasa TV stations.

Some rooms near Lhasa railway station are being used as temporary prisons; some detained Tibetans have been sent to a prison to the northwest of Lhasa by train; others taken to Siling (Chin. Xining) in Qinghai Province, and reportedly searched as many as seven times en route.

Tibetans without official TAR identification are, without exception, prohibited from entering Lhasa.

TAR authorities have notified travel agencies that foreign tourists are prohibited from taking tours to the TAR in order to ensure that the Olympic torch passes “safely” through the Himalayan region. This order revoked the decision made by tourism departments last week that Tibet would be open to foreign tour groups again from 1 May onwards.
(reported by sources to TibetInfoNet, 11 April 2008)

Life is “returning to normal” in Lhasa. A tourist from Shanghai told Xinhua: “People here are friendly and the police are kind. They often remind us to take care”. However, foreigners are “still advised not to enter Tibet, […] the Tibet government has suspended handling the application of foreigners to travel to Tibet for safety concerns. Those already in Tibet [on 14 March] were also advised to leave soon”.
Landun, a four-storey children’s clothes store which was “burnt and looted” on 14 March has re-opened its first floor although rebuilding and decoration had not yet started. Shopowner Jia Xuanchi from eastern Zhejiang Province said: “The government has worked out some preferential policies for affected businessmen. I’m not going to give up the market in Lhasa”. According to the government’s promise, he will not have to pay personal income tax until 28 April 2010.
Many shops on Duosenge Road remain closed, but owners left their names and contacts on their doors, “telling customers that they would return one day”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 11 April 2008)

Life is “returning to normal” in Lhasa. A tourist from Shanghai told Xinhua: “People here are friendly and the police are kind. They often remind us to take care”. However, foreigners are “still advised not to enter Tibet, […] the Tibet government has suspended handling the application of foreigners to travel to Tibet for safety concerns. Those already in Tibet [on 14 March] were also advised to leave soon”.
Landun, a four-storey children’s clothes store which was “burnt and looted” on 14 March has re-opened it’s first floor although rebuilding and decoration had not yet started. Shopowner Jia Xuanchi from eastern Zhejiang Province said: “The government has worked out some preferential policies for affected businessmen. I’m not going to give up the market in Lhasa”. According to the government’s promise, he will not have to pay personal income tax until 28 April 2010.
Many shops on Duosenge Road remain closed, but owners left their names and contacts on their doors, “telling customers that they would return one day”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 11 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Ngari Prefecture (Chin: Ali) » Sen-gay town, Ruthog county (Chin: Ritu Xian)

Date unspecified; circa 10 April: four or five young Tibetan boys held a protest; PAP personnel detained them in Sen-gay town, the location of Ngari Prefecture governmental offices. The boys were later released. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 10 April 2008)

  Wednesday, 09 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » [Kanlho TAP]

Mao Shengwu, acting chief of Gannan TAP, said that 2,204 people, including 519 monks, “have surrendered to police in connection with riots in an ethnic Tibetan area of northwestern China last month” [Mao Shengwu paraphrased by Xinhua]. Police have released 1,870 of those people, including 413 monks, “who were guilty of minor offences”. Mao told a group of Chinese and foreign journalists: “Police had formally arrested eight people suspected of participating in the riots and put another 432, including 170 monks, in temporary custody”; “Some suspects were being interrogated according to law, but some people wanted in connection with the riots were yet to be found” [two quotations: Mao Shengwu as paraphrased by Xinhua].
The situation in the prefecture “had been brought under control and normal public life had resumed … However, the prefecture would open to foreign tourists and journalists only when it was considered safe to do so as a handful of rioters were still at large” [Mao Shengwu paraphrased by Xinhua]. Mao said, “We will open to foreign tourists and journalists in time when social order is fully restored” [quotation: Mao Shengwu].
Mao said “The prefectural government has decided to exempt affected businesses from taxes and provide free seed for farmers, among other measures to help [the] local economy recover” [Mao Shengwu paraphrased by Xinhua].
[Note: Xinhua did not specify where the riots occurred, but reported that they occurred in “an ethnic Tibetan area of northwestern China”. There is no indication that farmers were adversely affected by a short outbreak of unrest or even riots in urban areas, necessitating a need for free seed in order to “help [the] local economy recover”.]
A group of more than 20 Chinese and foreign journalists arrived in Gannan on 9 April for a four-day trip organised by the Information Office of China’s State Council; Scheduled to visit Xiahe [Tib: Labrang], Hezuo [Tib: Tsoe; Chin: Gannan/Hezuo, Maqu [Tib: Machu] and Luqu [Tib: Luchu], “the areas worst affected by the riots”, to interview “residents, living Buddhas, and government officials”.
On Wednesday morning, they interviewed Jamyang Losang Jigme Tubdain Qoigyi Nyima, vice president of the Tibetan Chapter of the Buddhist Association of China, who said “the destruction in Gannan was the blatant exposure of separatism and insanity” [paraphrased by Xinhua].
Later a tour of Labrang monastery “was interrupted by a group of lamas … About 20 lamas rushed out of a building of the temple in Xiahe [Tib: Labrang monastery], and gathered in plaza in front of the journalists at around 12.30pm. The lamas left the site of their own accord about five minutes later as reporters resumed their tour of the lamasery” [note: Xinhua did not state why the Tibetan monks interrupted the tour] .
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 09 April 2008)

Jamyang Losang Jigme Tubdain Qoigyi Nyima, “a living Buddha of the renowned Labrang Lamasery” who is also “vice-president of the Tibetan Chapter of the Buddhist Association of China”, addressed a “recent” media tour to Gansu Province organised by the State Council Information Office [according to other reports, the address took place on 9 April]. He said, “violent activities instigated by separatists had tainted the image of lamas and left people disheartened” [paraphrased by Xinhua]; “events in Gansu were nothing but blatant examples of separatism and insanity” [paraphrased by Xinhua].
Following the 14 March riots in Lhasa, “a series of incidents involving assault, vandalism, looting and arson” broke out in the counties of Xiahe [Tib: Sangchu], Maqu [Tib: Machu], Luqu [Tib: Luchu] and Jone [Tib: Chone; Chin: Zhuoni], and the city of Hezuo [Tib: Tsoe; Chin: Gannan/Hezuo] in the Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture.
Ninety-four people were injured in the riots in Gannan [TAP], which also caused 230 million yuan ($32.9 million) worth of damage. The injured included “91 police officers, two government officials and one civilian” [local government paraphrased by Xinhua].
Labrang will not expel any monks who were engaged in the riots, but “a few lawbreakers will have to be dealt with. Like anyone else, they have to abide by the law” [quotation: Jamyang]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 16 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

At around 12:30pm, fifteen monks from Ladrang monastery staged a protest in front of a government-controlled media tour; the monks carried the Tibetan flag and banners reading “We have no freedom of speech”; they approached the journalists, voiced their support for the Dalai Lama and shouted in Chinese: “We want independence, human rights and we want to see the return of His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. There were no confirmed reports of arrests.
(reported by CTA, 10 April 2008)

More than a dozen monks shouted slogans in Tibetan in an outer courtyard as visiting journalists entered a prayer hall at Labrang monastery; “We want human rights, we want the Dalai Lama back, we want to preserve our religion and culture”. The number of monks grew to about two dozen during the 10-minute protest.
ABC reporter Chito Romana witnessed the outburst; said Chinese Foreign Ministry handlers observed the protest but did not attempt to block the monks; the group walked away after senior monks appeared and calmed them down. Shortly afterward, a senior monk told reporters the protesters represented only a few of those at Labrang. He said they would not be punished by monastery authorities, but could face sanctions if authorities find that they broke the law.
The Associated Press was not invited on the government-arranged trip (but an AP reporter was present during a similar interruption at Lhasa’s Jokhang temple on 27 March). A Labrang monk spoke to AP by phone following the Labrang incident but declined to be named for fear of reprisals; said he and the others were worried about getting arrested after the journalists leave. He said the group waved the Tibetan flag and shouted: “We’re not against the Olympics. We need human rights”. He told AP, “Once they [the journalists] leave, of course there will be arrests” and that following demonstrations in March, up to 20 monks from Labrang monastery were taken away and only three or four have been released so far. He added that he hoped the reporters would come back: “There’s a lot we haven’t yet said”.
(reported by AP, 09 April 2008)

A delegation of domestic and overseas media visited “riot-hit areas” in Gansu Province; “They are scheduled to visit the worst hit areas in the riots and interview local residents, living buddhas, and government officials”. Jiamuyang [Tib: Jamyang], head of Labrang monastery, told the media group that “the riots in Lhasa and Gannan were manufactured by separatists […] This can be seen as a great madness and big exposure of the separatists”. During the journalists’ visit to Labrang monastery, “the tour was interrupted by a group of monks, but soon resumed”. The visit was interrupted when “over a dozen young monks carrying Tibetan independence flags, walked out of the monastery and shouted slogans for Tibetan independence to the journalists”.
(reported by CCTV, 10 April 2008)

Labrang eyewitness account: A group of foreign journalists arrived in Labrang monastery; 30 monks protested in front of the journalists.
Subsequently, the local Chinese authority increased its military forces [in the area]; Labrang monastery “put monks under tight security control”; many innocent Tibetans arrested for no reason.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

About 15 monks defied authorities and staged a protest in front of foreign reporters at Labrang monastery during a government-controlled media tour. The monks carried banners and voiced support for the Dalai Lama; in Chinese they said: “We want more freedom, more human rights and we want to see the Dalai Lama”. After about ten minutes, the protest ended when government officials conducting the tour urged the foreign journalists to leave.
(reported by AFP, 09 April 2008)

The Chinese authorities took a group of journalists to Labrang monastery on a tightly scripted tour to show that Labrang was calm, but 15 monks rushed up to the journalists and said that their human rights were being systematically violated; one of the monks was crying. The monks were later imprisoned, beaten and in some cases subjected to electric shock torture; this it is impossible to confirm, “and Tibetan versions of events are sometimes exaggerated”. Apparently the police had jeered at the monks during the beatings: “The Dalai Lama, Western countries and the United States aren’t protecting you now. Tell them to come and save you!”
(reported by New York Times, 15 May 2008)

Fifteen monks burst into the courtyard at Labrang monastery where about 20 Chinese and foreign journalists on a state-organised media tour were assembled. Chinese security photographed the entire protest; some of the monks carried Tibetan flags made out of paper; several of them wept as they spoke to the journalists for several minutes, first in Tibetan and then in Chinese; they spoke quickly, often at the same time. One monk then said: “We want human rights. We want freedom. Now, we can’t stay under Chinese control. They put pressure on Tibet from everywhere. [Under the Chinese], we can’t [develop on our Buddhist path]”. Another monk said: “A lot of people [in Labrang] have been arrested, and a lot of army are in the streets. No human rights. No freedom. We have to denounce the Dalai Lama. We want the Dalai Lama to come back soon. A few days before we protested and then they put the poison [tear gas] on us. A lot of people arrested. A lot of soldiers here. No human rights. No freedom.”

One of the monks said that they were not against the Chinese hosting the Olympic Games; he said that “they” (the Chinese authorities) had reported that the monks had knives and guns, but added “We don’t have anything like that”.

The whereabouts now of the monks is unknown; several sources report that they were taken into custody after the journalists had left Labrang and were escorted to Machu (Chin. Maqu)
(reported by ICT, 16 April 2008)

A four-day media tour to Gannan TAP, a “riot-hit region”, was interrupted by “a group of lamas [sic] at the Labrang Lamasery [sic]”, at around 12:30pm but “soon resumed”. About 20 monks rushed from a building at the monastery and gathered in front of more than 20 Chinese and foreign journalists. Xinhua reported that the “lamas” left the site about “five minutes later themselves” [implying that there was no intervention from security personnel]. Gun’gyihu Jinba, deputy director of the monastery’s administrative office, said that those who disrupted the tour were only a “handful few” of the 1,000 resident monks: “As you all can see, they tipped our religious order”. “Living Buddha” Dainkaicang told reporters that the “lamas” were ignorant and were “hoodwinked and instigated by the separatists”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 09 April 2008)

Around fifteen Tibetan monks defiantly briefed a group of foreign media personnel on a government-managed tour to Gansu Province. The monks stated that eight monks were still being held by authorities. Seven monks from Labrang monastery are known to have been arrested on 1 April.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Luchu county town, Luchu county (Chin: Luqu Xian)

Armed police are manning a roadblock leading from the town of Luqu [Tib: Luchu] toward the monastery of Xicang, some of whose monks are believed to have taken part in protests in mid-March. The monastery remains closed to outsiders.
The glass front of the town’s police headquarters was riddled with holes from stones and other objects hurled by rioters. Notices on the walls urged participants in the protest to surrender to authorities; unarmed paramilitary police marched down the street and stood guard outside government buildings.
(reported by AP, 09 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Rongkhar town, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Date not specified: since the beginning of April, Tibetans in Rongkhar town have been forced to attend patriotic re-education classes. During the classes, among other activities, each Tibetan is forced to repeat the following statements while being recorded on video:

  1. I denounce the ’Dalai’s clique’.
  2. I will not keep any portraits of the Dalai Lama.
  3. I have no desire to become a part of the ’Dalai’s clique’.
  4. I will not engage in any ‘splittist’ activities.
  5. The attempt to separate the nationalities of China will not succeed.
  6. I owe loyalty to the Chinese Communist Party.
  7. I will always follow the Chinese Communist Party.
  8. I acknowledge the gratitude of [my gratitude to?] the Chinese Communist Party.

Such classes continue to take place throughout Ngaba county and beyond. In some remote villages, the ‘patriotic re-education’ classes are being conducted in an extremely intimidating manner.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Qiangba Puncog, Chairman of the TAR government, announced that police have detained 953 suspects involved in the “14 March violence” in Lhasa.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 April 2008)

At a press briefing in Beijing, Qiangba Puncog [Tib: Jampa Phuntsog], TAR chairman, said that police in Tibet have detained 953 people suspected of participating in the 14 March violence in Lhasa; 403 were formally arrested; 362 people “delivered themselves to the law enforcement”, 328 of whom have been set free due to their minor offenses and willingness to cooperate. The police listed 93 suspects as the most wanted; 13 of them have “already” been arrested.
Qiangba Puncog said that after the riots were stopped, local government “timely cured” more than 380 people injured in the violence and offered compensation to families of 18 innocent civilians who died. The government quickly restored public facilities such as power and telecommunications; affected factories and businesses were subsidised by the government to offset their loss.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 09 April 2008)

At a press briefing in Beijing, Qiangba Puncog [Tib: Jampa Phuntsog], TAR chairman, said that “none of the monks identified as fatalities by the Dalai Lama had proven to be dead after careful investigation” [quotation of Xinhua, paraphrasing Qiangba Puncog]; “Of the list provided by the Dalai Lama, five referred to monks who served at lamaseries in the autonomous region” [quotation of Xinhua, paraphrasing Qiangba Puncog].
Qiangba Puncog said, “The police tried to verify those ‘victims’ one by one. The result was that one name was a fabrication” and the other four were alive and well" [quotation of Qiangba Puncog; the additional closed quotation mark after “fabrication” appears in the Xinhua report].
Qiangba Puncog rebutted the Dalai Lama’s contention that most Tibetans yearned for his spiritual leadership, including Qiangba Puncog himself and Ragdi; he said, “the overwhelming majority of the Tibetan people, including monks, are supporting the Communist Party of China and our socialism”.
Qiangba Puncog said foreign reporters can still visit Tibet after going through relevant procedures.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 09 April 2008)

  Tuesday, 08 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

The second group of foreign journalists invited by the Chinese government to visit Tibet arrived at Labrang monastery; twenty or so monks ran out from the prayer hall holding Tibetan flags and told the journalists they wanted the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet, that they were not demanding complete independence, but that they wanted human rights which had been denied to them since Chinese rule was established.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, Dzoge county (Chin: Ruanggui/Zoige Xian)

Ngaba TAP authorities indefinitely closed down the school run by Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery on 8 April due to the participation by a number of its students, along with senior monks of the monastery, in a protest at Dzoge county headquarters on 15 March. The school’s 504 students – novice monks below the age of 18 and children from poor surrounding nomadic areas which lack education facilities – were sent back to their homes and families.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Tak-tsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

The authorities closed the school of Tak-tsang Lhamo Kirti monastery because its students had allegedly joined the protest staged by the monks of Tak-tsang Lhamo Kirti monastery on 15 March. For monks below the age of 18 and local children, the school was the main institution to study Tibetan language and cultural sciences.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Having failed “to bomb a fuel station and a police service spot in Gartog” on 7 April, a monk named Tashi Tsering “allegedly ignited the bomb while passing an armed police station” early on 8 April.
[Notes: No reported casualties and no explanation given as to why the incident was not reported until almost two months later. Chinaview (Xinhuanet) 05/06/08 did not state to which monastery the monks belonged, but Reuters 05/06/08 referred to a different Xinhua report which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery; an article by Josephine Ma in the South China Morning Post (publication date unknown) also referred to a Xinhua report which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery. Referring to Xinhua, Reuters and the South China Morning Post were also more specific in stating that the target was PAP barracks, and that the bomb was “home-made”.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

“Earsplitting drumbeats and colourful banners fluttering in the spring breeze marked the opening on Tuesday of Longwei Furniture Plaza, a [new] private-sector retailer on Jinzhu West Road”
Life has “gradually returned to normal” after the 14 March riot “that was believed to have been organised, premeditated and masterminded by backers of the Dalai Lama”. Five hundred or so of the shops that were damaged or looted have resumed business. The TAR government has promised to exempt the 908 damaged shops from business and corporate income taxes, urban maintenance and construction taxes and educational surcharges. Shop owners will not have to pay personal income tax from 1 March 2008 until 28 April 2010. Local authorities have allocated 600,000 yuan to seven schools burned. The money will go for repairs and new equipment.
Chilai Doje, secretary of the Chengguan District Committee of the Communist Party of China, said: “The government is capable of safeguarding social stability and advancing a prosperous market in the city”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 09 April 2008)

Due to a severe shortage of beds in at least two public hospitals in Lhasa, many very sick patients were turned away on 8 April. According to local Tibetans, the shortage of beds is due to the number of Tibetans injured through beatings and wounded by gunfire since the protests began in March.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

Authorities forced around 40 Tibetans, who were in Lhasa for pilgrimage and business, to return home to Gonjo (Chin: Gongjue) county, Chamdo prefecture, because they are not permanent residents of Lhasa. However, Chinese non-residents of Lhasa have not been forced to leave.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

Chomsigkang market, severely damaged in the 14 March riot, resumed operation on 8 April, “a signal that the city’s largest commodity distribution centre has returned to normal”; 80 percent of the 1,300 vendors have re-opened their booths. A business woman from Sichuan Province said “We are confident of the Chomsigkang market”.
Tibet’s largest furniture market opened for the first time in Lhasa on the same day, with an investment of 10 million yuan (about US$1.3 million).
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 08 April 2008)

  Monday, 07 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Ngora township, Machu County

During the evening, thirty monks from Ngul-ra monastery were arrested; ten people [presumably monks, but may have included visiting laypeople] from Thumey-runak monastery, Ngul-ra township, were also arrested. [CTA did not provide reasons for the arrests, i.e. protests, and did not specify whether or not the arrests occurred during two separate incidents at these two monasteries, or if the arrests occurred during one incident within the township]. So far, “over 110 had been arrested” [CTA does not specify where these arrests occurred, but presumably all 110 were arrested within Ngul-ra township].
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Siling Municipality (Chin: Xining Shi) » Siling (Chin: Xining)

Week commencing 7 April: A group of around 300 prisoners arrived at Xining train station from Lhasa; according to a witness, “Every prisoner seemed to be hurt badly and some had blood on their faces. There was an old lady in the group with heavy shackles on her feet, and no shoes. She was being beaten by the police”.
(reported by ICT, 14 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Ratroe nunnery, Tawu county (Chin: Daifu Xian)

Following a protest by nuns from Ratroe nunnery on 2 April, armed forces have imposed tight restrictions at the nunnery and announced that ‘patriotic re-education’ classes will soon commence.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Woser monastery, Dartsedo county (Chin: Kangding Xian)

Date unspecified; understood to be the week commencing 7 April: Chinese authorities conducted ‘patriotic re-education classes’; monks were forced to denounce the Dalai Lama; some monks refused and resigned from the monastery.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Tashi Tsering “and another three monks allegedly intended to bomb a fuel station and a police service spot in Gartog at 9pm, but failed”.
[Notes: Xinhua provided no explanation given as to why the incident was not reported until almost two months later. Chinaview (Xinhuanet) 05/06/08 did not state to which monastery the monks belonged, but Reuters 05/06/08 referred to a different Xinhua article which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery; an article by Josephine Ma in the South China Morning Post (publication date unknown) also referred to a Xinhua article which stated Kebalong [Khenlung] monastery.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Four small explosions are said to have occurred in the Markham area on 6-7 April. No casualties were reported. [See also RFA entry for 24 May 2008]
(reported by RFA, 29 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Ramoche temple, Lhasa

Ramoche Ramoche monastery [temple] usually houses over one hundred monks; on 7 April, “all” monks from Ramoche were arrested with the exception of around 30.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

Around 70 Tibetan monks from Ramoche temple were detained by PAP and PSB personnel on the night of 7 April, following a “midnight raid” on the monks’ residences. The monks’ whereabouts remain unknown. Only a few monks remain at Ramoche temple, which usually houses around a hundred monks. Severe restrictions have been imposed on the movement of Ramoche temple’s monks since 14 March.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 April 2008)

  Sunday, 06 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mi-nyak Nagtren village, Garthar, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Local police and officials arrived on 6 April to remove various slogans such as “Free Tibet” which had been written on stone tablets and billboards boards in red paint in Ge-kay Thang Street in Mi-nyak Nagtren village; this resulted in minor clashes with the local Tibetans. Authorities arrived in the village to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyitso monastery, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Disobeying the order announced on the previous day, and despite the “massive” deployment of hundreds of armed police, local Tibetans took “other routes” and gathered at Nyitso monastery. Monks led “Buddhist rituals related to recent political events” [clarification: the occasion was the annual Monlam prayer ceremony which was to end with the Torgya – an apotropaic ritual intended to dispel evil and bad luck]. In a statement to the public, the monastery announced that the planned ritual performance and candlelight vigil was in accordance with His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s non-violence principles.
At around 12 noon, the monks and laypeople left the monastery [it is assumed en route to perform the rituals outside]; reaching the main road, more than 400 armed police tried to stop them; the authorities told the crowd that only the monks were allowed to proceed with the ritual performance. The laypeople became upset, shouted: “We don’t have freedom in our own land; we want complete freedom; we must invite His Holiness to Tibet immediately; Chinese should return to China; Tibet and China should be separate countries”.
The authorities [the armed police] “fire[d] live ammunition to disperse the crowd”. At least ten Tibetan protesters were shot; five of the wounded were arrested.
The protesters dispersed but then re-gathered at the monastery; they called the county head, telling him they would sacrifice their lives if the five wounded Tibetans were not released. Those detained were immediately released, for fear of “massive” demonstrations, but the county government hospital reportedly “refused to treat them or the other Tibetans who had been shot”.
The wounded included:

  1. Dhondup, from Yeshi village.
  2. Gyaltsen, from Bubho village.
  3. Tsewang Gyaltsen, from Panglong village.

Their conditions were reportedly “so critical that they could not be treated at the county hospital” [this implies that the hospital lacked the facilities to treat serious gunshot wounds or a high volume of seriously injured patients, thus contradicting the comment above about the hospital’s refusal to treat the injured]. Several monks set off by car to take the injured to a larger hospital; reportedly stopped by the authorities in Dartsedo; it is “not known whether [or not] they have yet received medical treatment”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gyanbe township, Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Police seized nine suspects in connection with the bombing of a Tibetan township government building, which occurred on 23 March. 27-year-old alleged ringleader Rinqen Jamcan is a “ranking monk in the Tongxia monastery in the town, while the other eight are monks from the temple. The suspects have confessed to the crime”. This alleged explosion was not reported by Chinese media until 13 April [however, a similar incident in Gonjo county – presumably the same incident – was reported by RFA, 02/04/08].
(reported by CCTV, 13 April 2008)

China arrested nine Tibetan Buddhist monks accused of detonating a homemade bomb in a government building in eastern Tibet [identified as Gyanbe township, Gonjo county]. Xinhua news agency did not explain why the alleged explosion of 23 March was not reported until 13 April; the BBC noted that news of the arrests came as Beijing continued to attack overseas critics of its crackdown in the Himalayan region. Xinhua claimed that the monks confessed to planting the explosive. [Note: a similar incident in Gonjo county – presumably the same incident – was reported by RFA on 2 April 2008.]
(reported by BBC, 13 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Four small explosions are said to have occurred in the Markham area on 6-7 April. No casualties were reported. [See also RFA entry for 24 May 2008]
(reported by RFA, 29 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

So far, over 500 stores among the 908 damaged during the riot on 14 March in Lhasa have been re-opened to customers. The regional government has promised compensation measures including interest-free and government subsidised loans for businesses and merchants who suffered losses during the riot [however, it is not stated whether or not those re-opened stores had received financial support from the government.]
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 07 April 2008)

  Saturday, 05 April 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dawu (Tawu) county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Around a thousand people, monks and laypeople, gathered at Nya-tso monastery for the annual Tor-kyak ritual (held to ward off evil forces); held a ‘prayer march’ towards the Dawu county government headquarters; the monks were allowed through but armed forces prevented the laypeople from continuing. Laypeople protested; shouted slogans: “More human rights in Tibet” and “Long live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”; the armed forces opened fire on the crowd, injuring many, including:

  1. Tsewang Gyaltsen (Gyatso), from Pang-nang village.
  2. Mabhu Gyaltsen (Gyatso), from Rehu village.
  3. Yapshi Dhondup.

Some of those injured were in a critical condition; could not be treated at the local county hospital; taken to a bigger hospital in China. Further details regarding injuries, deaths and arrests were unavailable.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Lithang monastery, Lithang county (Chin: Litang xian)

On 4 and 5 April, Chinese officials arrived at Lithang monastery and demanded that monks provide their signatures on blank pieces of paper, but the monks refused; the monastery heads would not co-operate when pressured by the officials to convince the monks to provide signatures.
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mintso monastery, Dawu (Tawu) (Chin: Daofu)

Monks planned a special ceremony to mourn those killed in earlier protests, despite a warning that Chinese police had orders to shoot on sight anyone seen protesting. Local people joined them; the crowd grew to about 1,000; they marched peacefully while reciting prayers but they were blocked by several hundred armed police. Eventually, the monks were allowed to pass but the laypeople were stopped. The crowd became agitated and raised slogans.
The police opened fire on the crowds and injured about fifteen Tibetans; five of them were seriously injured and were detained. The monks called the head of Daofu county and warned that if those detained were not released, all the monks would continue protesting even if it meant they would be killed. Those detained were then released and the injured were taken to the local hospital but they were denied treatment. Ten of the Tibetans were later reported to be in a stable condition, while four of those more seriously injured were being taken to China for medical treatment in a vehicle owned by Mintso monastery. An official at the Daofu PSB confirmed that a protest had occurred but added: “Now everything is quiet and under control”.
Before phone lines in the area were cut, a witness told RFA: “Please tell the world what we are doing here and that the Chinese are waging a violent crackdown”.
(reported by RFA, 05 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mi-nyak Nagtren village, Garthar, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

The Chinese flag was lowered at a school near Rabgang monastery in Mi-nyak Nagtren village.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyitso monastery, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Monks at Lingque temple [Nyitso monastery] were joined by several hundred pilgrims for [the annual Monlam] prayer ceremony [which ended with a ritual], the Torgya, “which is meant to exorcise evil elements from society” [it is an apotropaic ritual intended to dispel evil and bad luck]. The police “appeared to grow anxious about the size of the crowd”, which included monks, about 400 nomads, local residents, students and even civil servants who wore dust masks to conceal their identity. Around midday, security forces ordered a halt to the ceremony but the demonstrators refused to leave; the stand-off lasted for several hours. Police opened fire to disperse the protesters, who demanded the return of the Dalai Lama; about ten people were wounded. A resident stated: “The police opened fire. We could hear it. But I haven’t heard about any of the people throwing stones at the security forces.”
(reported by The Times, 07 April 2008)

Monks at Nyintso monastery gathered for the annual Torgya ceremony “when evil elements are believed to be exorcised from society” [clarification: the occasion was the annual Monlam prayer ceremony, which ended with a Torgya ritual, an apotropaic ritual intended to dispel evil and bad luck]. More than 1,000 monks are resident at the monastery; between 700 and 800 laypeople also gathered for the ceremony, despite the authorities’ announcements posted to warn local people to stay indoors or else be shot.
The authorities tried to confiscate ritual objects which were to be used for performing the ceremony; the monks “refused to comply, despite a massive deployment of police”.
At around noon [on 5 April; note: Tibet Watch stated around noon on 6 April], monks and laypeople left the monastery to observe the ceremony but were met on the main road by 400 armed police who would only allow the monks to proceed with observing the ceremony; great anger amongst the laypeople who shouted: “We don’t have freedom in our own land; we want complete freedom; the Dalai Lama must return to Tibet and the Chinese should return to China; Tibet and China should be separate countries”. As the shouting got louder, the police fired live rounds into the crowd to disperse it; ten Tibetans wounded by gunfire, five of whom were arrested. Three of those wounded were:

  1. Dhondup, from Yeshi village.
  2. Gyaltsen, from Bubho village.
  3. Tsewang Gyaltsen, from Panglong village.

The crowd subsequently re-gathered at the monastery; the protesters agreed to sacrifice their own lives if the authorities refused to release those arrested.
Fearing “massive demonstrations”, the authorities released the five wounded Tibetans; the county government hospital refused to treat them; monks arranged funds to allow the wounded to be taken to a hospital elsewhere, but they were halted by the authorities in Thartsedo [Dartsedo; Chin: Kangding] on the evening of 6 April. It is still unclear whether or not any of them have received medical attention, or if any of them have died.
(reported by FTC, 09 April 2008)

Information about a planned gathering at Nyitso monastery reached local authorities; they posted announcements warning people to stay indoors or risk being shot. The authorities threatened to confiscate the monks’ ritual objects “to prevent the gathering taking place” but the monks “refused to let them”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor (Chin: Donggu) monastery, Zithang township, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Chinese armed forces carried out an aggressive search at Tongkor monastery; windows at the residence of the spiritual head of the monastery were shattered; statues in the prayer hall were dismantled; the situation at Tongkor monastery was described as being “reminiscent of the Cultural Revolution”. Tongkor monastery houses many ancient artefacts and religious objects.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor monastery, Tongkhor town, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi xian)

The Chinese authorities reportedly took away the bodies of those killed on 3 April. The monastery remained under the control of “Chinese military soldiers”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Namtso monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Date unspecified: A monk from Namtso monastery was reportedly beaten to death by police in front of the public. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 05 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Tsok-tsang monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A large contingent of PAP personnel arrived; searched monks’ quarters; two monks were arrested:

  1. Tsultrim Gyatso, from Chukra village.
  2. Lobsang Thupten, from Dopel village.
    (reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

At 11.25pm, Tenphel and another three monks (from Wese monastery) “allegedly bombed a transformer in Gartog township using explosives, detonators and fuses provided by [a monk named] Chogyal”.
[Notes: Xinhua reported that the case involved Chogyal, Tenphel and another three monks who allegedly “plotted to bomb key county establishments on April 3”. However, no details were provided for any incidents on 3 April; the incident described was stated as occurring on 5 April. Therefore, it is assumed that the bombing was allegedly planned on 3 April. No reported casualties and no explanation given as to why the incident was not reported until two months later. See also Garthog township, 13 May 2008; Chinaview, 05/06/08.]
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Dechen town, Dagze county (Chin: Deqing)

A local procuratorate issued arrest warrants for 16 people who were allegedly involved in a riot on 15 March in Dagze county. The suspects were all “illiterate or semi-literate” residents of Deqing town who were “largely ignorant of the law”. Cang’zhoigar, a mother of two, was named as a suspect in the riot: “On that night, I heard people shouting loudly outside and I joined them, hurling stones at police officers and destroying shops. I didn’t know what was going on but followed their suit blindly. I really regret it”. According to Xinhua, “Cang’zhoigar said that the country’s preferential policies had helped her family. A housing program that began in 2006 enabled her family to build a two-story, seven-bedroom house with a subsidy of 14,000 yuan [about 1,870 U.S. dollars]. They also had a one-hectare farm that was tax-exempt, with a government fertilizer allowance”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet) , 05 April 2008)

  Friday, 04 April 2008
  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Chentsa county (Chin: Jianza)

More than 30 people were arrested for alleged involvement in the protests on 22 and 23 March.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkor, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Following demonstrations and deaths by police gunfire on 3 April, ten people missing including a monk named Ciwang Renzhen [Tib: Tsewang Rinchen?]. Armed paramilitary police patrolled “the streets of the village” and surrounded [Tongkor] monastery. All communications had been cut.
(reported by The Times, 04 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Dzoge county (Chin: Zoige Xian)

Security forces raided Dring Sumdo monastery. Laypeople from Dreloong village saw the security forces and their convoy, and assumed that monks were being arrested; they formed a human barricade on the main road, but when they discovered there had been no arrests, there were no further incidents that day.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Lhasa authorities sent out a text message to the mobile phones of all residents, offering a reward of 20,000 yuan (£1,300) to anyone giving information leading to the arrest of those wanted for the [14 March] violence.
(reported by The Times, 05 April 2008)

Police issued their Number 13 most wanted list, bringing to 79 the number of people still sought for their roles in the 14 March riot. Lhasa authorities sent out a message by mobile phone to residents, offering a reward of 20,000 yuan (£1,300) to anyone who could offer information leading to the arrest of those wanted for the violence.
(reported by The Times, 04 April 2008)

  Thursday, 03 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Achok township, Sangchu county

About 200 truckloads of soldiers arrived at Achok township and surrounded Achok monastery. About 15 monks were arrested. In total about 30 monks from Achok monastery are in prison [Note: the source provides no further details about the other 15 monks currently in detention].
(reported by agamsgecko.blogspot.com, 06 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Bora, Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Date unclear in ICT report of 3 April: According to a Tibetan source, “Chinese security forces are increasing pressure on local people to hand over those who participated in the 18 March protest. Announcements about surrender abound in the area these days but nomads are afraid to give themselves up since they believe that they would be asked to sign denunciation letters against the Dalai Lama”.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Machu (Chin: Maqu), Machu county (Chin: Maqu xian)

Date not clear in ICT report of 3 April: Police are carrying out door-to-door searches and arresting Tibetans, their whereabouts unknown. A source stated: “In some areas, all the men have fled to the mountains to avoid arrest. There is terrible fear everywhere”.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Date unclear in ICT report of 3 April: In a township in Draggo county, local villagers and monks clashed with a work team requiring them to sign a document denouncing the Dalai Lama. More than ten monks were beaten and arrested, and several hundred soldiers deployed in the town. According to a source, “Nobody is willing to sign the documents denouncing the Dalai Lama, which may lead to another bloody crackdown”.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

Paramilitary police entered Drangko [Draggo/Drango] monastery in a hunt for banned photographs. Witnesses said that the police threw the pictures on the ground and stamped on them.
(reported by The Times, 05 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor (Chin: Donggu) monastery, Zithang township, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

A work team returned to Tongkor monastery with hundreds of PAP and PSB personnel; monks’ residences were ransacked; photos of the Dalai Lama and Tongkor Shabdrung, the monastery’s head lama [living in exile], mobile phone and other belongings were confiscated. A monk in his 70s named Geshe Tsultrim Tenzin and a layman Tsultrim Phuntsok, 26, were both arrested.

More than 300 monks marched towards the local county government headquarters; joined by hundreds of laypeople; demanded the release of Geshe Tsultrim Tenzin and Tsultrim Phuntsok. The crowds dispersed when officials announced that the two monks would be released at 8 pm, but when this promise was broken, the demonstrators returned. En route they were confronted by PAP and PSB personnel; a scuffle broke out between protestors and the police; the police opened fire, killing at least eight Tibetans and injuring dozens more. Many others were arrested.

Those killed include:

  1. Zangden, 27, monk, from Tsangyoe Village
  2. Phurbu Delek, 30
  3. Tseyang Kyi, 23, female
  4. Druklo Tso, 34, female from Gugra village
  5. Tenlo, 32, female from Gugra village

The identities of three others could not be ascertained.

Nyima, Kalpo (Kabhuk) and Thupten Gelek, three monks originally from Sheru village, and monks of Tongkor monastery sustained bullet injuries and are known to be in a critical condition. The whereabouts is unknown of Tsewang Rinzin, a disciplinary master of Tongkor monastery.
(reported by TCHRD, 05 April 2008)

Monks at a small monastery in Dhonkar (Tongkhor) were told by local Chinese officials to denounce the Dalai Lama. When they refused, the monastery was searched. On finding an antique ceremonial pistol, occasionally used [symbolically] in religious ceremonies, soldiers moved in to make arrests. A senior monk was taken to the nearby police station; monks and laypeople gathered outside to peacefully protest; soldiers opened fire on the unarmed crowd; ten Tibetans shot dead, including a 22-year-old girl, Tse Yangky. More than 75 people were injured; local hospital cordoned off by Chinese troops and causalities unable to get medical help.
(reported by Tibet Society UK / Tibetan Youth UK, 04 April 2008)

Chinese armed forces fired live ammunition indiscriminately into a protesting crowd of Tibetans. At least 14 are known to have been shot dead on that day (eight previously reported). The bodies of the dead have not been returned to the families.
(reported by TCHRD, 17 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor monastery, Tongkhor town, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi xian)

A religious ceremony was held; some lay Tibetans in attendance. Lobsang Jamyang, the “chant master in charge of the monastery”, informed the monks of the authorities’ visit on the previous day [presumably the session on 2 April had been attended only by senior monks] and their intention to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’; Lobsang Jamyang stated he would not denounce the Dalai Lama even if it cost him his life; a monk named Yeshi Nyima stood up and said he too would refuse to denounce the Dalai Lama [and the sentiment was unanimous amongst those monks present].
Around 3,000 armed police deployed at the monastery searched the rooms of Geshe Sonam Tenzing, aged 74, and Tsultrim Phuntsok; they were arrested for possession of Dalai Lama photographs. In response, at 6pm around 370 monks and 400 lay Tibetans marched to the town’s authorities shouting, “Long live His Holiness” and “We don’t have freedom; we want freedom”. The authorities agreed to release Geshe Sonam Tenzing and Tsultrim Phuntsok within a couple of hours; this did not happen. Therefore the protesters marched back to the township authorities; en route they encountered hundreds of armed police; a clash occurred; the police opened fire with machine guns killing at least eight people:

  1. Samten, aged 27; monk.
  2. Phurbu Delek, 30, layman.
  3. Tsering Yangzom, female.
  4. Druklo Tso, female.
  5. Tsering Phuntsok and/or son of Tsering Phuntsog
  6. Daughter of Tsangge
  7. Lhundup Tso, female.
  8. Tenloe, female.

Thubten Gelek seriously injured; one monk’s ear was shot off, another monk shot in the shoulder. Many monks and laypeople ‘disappeared’, including Tsewang Rinzin. Eighty truckloads of armed police arrived that evening. Authorities announced rewards of 20,000-80,000 yuan for information about anyone reporting news of the incident to contacts abroad.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkor, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Protests by the monks of Tongkor monastery and local laypeople in Kardze county town on 2 and 3 April. During the protests a number of Tibetans were shot and killed by armed forces.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

An official work team recently arrived at Tongkor monastery; the monks objected to the officials’ orders to denounce the Dalai Lama and oppose ongoing demonstrations in Tibetan areas against Chinese rule. “Skirmishes” broke out; officials began searching monks’ quarters; some pictures of the Dalai Lama and the monastery’s tulku, Tongkor Shabdrung – now in exile – were found and thrown on the ground. A monk in his seventies, Tsultrim Tenzin, and another monk in his late twenties, Yeshe Nyima, voiced their objections; the incident escalated when these two monks were taken into custody.

Many or most of the 350-strong monastic community began a protest, joined by laypeople, calling for the Dalai Lama to return home and for the release of the Tongkor monks detained earlier. Armed police shot at the crowd, killing at least eight Tibetans including monks. Some monks injured by gunfire; more than ten monks are missing. Other reports state 15 dead and dozens injured.
(reported by ICT, 04 April 2008)

  1. Khechok Pawo, a monk aged 20, from Tong-khor monastery.
  2. Lhengho, a monk aged 35, from Tong-khor monastery.
    (reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

During a peaceful demonstration by Tonkgor monastery’s monks, PAP personnel fired on a crowd of several hundred, killing at least eight Tibetans:

  1. Tseyang Kyi, aged 22, female; Tongkor township.
  2. Thupten Sangten (Samten); a monk from Tsa-ngoe village, Tongkor township.
  3. BhuBhu (Phurbu) Delek, aged 27, male; Tongkor township.
  4. Unnamed child (son of Tsering Phuntsok); Druyak village, Tongkor township.
  5. Unnamed child (daughter of Tsan-goen family), Mogre village, Tongkor township.
  6. Druklo Tso, aged 34, female; Gugra village, Tongkor township.
  7. Tenlo, aged 32, female; Gugra village, Tongkor township.
  8. Unnamed male, Tongkor township.

Three monks, Kyalpo, Nyima and Thupten Gelek were critically injured by gunfire; others may also have been injured or killed but no further details available.
(reported by CTA, 05 April 2008)

Protests at Tong-khor township; armed forces opened fire on the crowd killing numerous people. Two of the confirmed dead are:

  1. Kunchok Sherab, a monk aged 30 from Tong-khor monastery.
  2. Tsering Dhondup, a layman aged 43 from Khar-soong village, Kardze county.

The authorities issued warnings: protestors that fled should surrender themselves. Attempts to commence ‘patriotic re-education’ classes have been resisted. The military continued to maintain 24-hour surveillance of Tong-khor township.
(reported by CTA, 10 April 2008)

Around 350 Tongkor monastery monks and 350 laypeople gathered to demand the release of two monks arrested on the previous day [this RFA report goes on to state that one of those arrested was a monk and the other was a layperson]. Officials told the demonstrators to leave for 25 minutes and calm themselves, and the men would be freed. The crowd refused to disperse; at 8 pm, paramilitary police opened fire on the crowd at Tongkor subdivision. Fifteen people were believed to have been killed; dozens injured and scores more unaccounted for.

Those reported to have been killed include:

  1. Samten, 27, monk
  2. Lobsang Rinchen, in his 20s, monk
  3. Zunde, monk
  4. Phurbu Delek, 30, male
  5. Sangmo, 34, female
  6. Tenlo, 32, female
  7. Tsering Yangzom, female
  8. Tseyang Kyi, 23, female
  9. Druklot Tso, 34, female
  10. Tsering Lhamo, female
  11. A young boy, identity not given

Two monks, Nyima and Thubten Gelek, were “seriously injured”.

A source told RFA: “One monk has been killed, and seven Tibetans. Yesterday morning the police came to some Tibetan houses and asked them not to mourn those Tibetans who died in earlier clashes, and not to post the Dalai Lama’s pictures. Then they had a clash with the police. Many people have been beaten up and arrested”.

Phone communication with the region was cut off after the shooting. A Chinese resident who saw reports of the unrest on television told RFA: “It wasn’t a protest. It was beating, smashing, and looting, like bandits. They couldn’t have fired shots-from what I saw on television, the police were very restrained, talking to them, advising them”.
(reported by RFA, 04 April 2008)

Around 370 monks from Tongkhor monastery marched with 400 Tibetan laypeople to the buildings of the civil authority in the town; protested for the release of the two monks arrested on the previous day; chanted slogans including “We don’t have freedom” and “Dalai Lama must return to Tibet”. The road into the town was blocked by hundreds of armed police; a stand-off ensued. Police opened fire with machine guns, killing at least eight protesters, including:

  1. Zamphel, a monk.
  2. Tsering Yangzom, female.
  3. Druklot Tso, female.
  4. The daughter of a Tibetan man named Sangay.
  5. Delek, male.
  6. Tenlung, male.
  7. Tsering Phuntsog, male.
    (reported by FTC, 04 April 2008)

A peaceful uprising was met with the arrival of 90 trucks of Chinese troops; they opened fire with machine guns, killing at least ten protesters including a 19-year-old girl; the death-toll could be much higher; many hundreds were injured; “The army did not allow the dead bodies to be collected instead the dead bodies were piled up into a large mound and then a bomb was put in the mound blowing all the bodies into small pieces and scattering the dead around the area”. Many hundreds were arrested from the town and monastery including the head monks; “no one knows if they are now alive or dead”. The town is now under total lockdown and curfew; no one can get in or out and telephones are cut.
(reported by tibetcustom.com, 04 April 2008)

A clash erupted after a government inspection team entered Donggu [Tib: Tongkor] monastery, searched the room of every monk, and confiscated all mobile phones and photographs of the Dalai Lama. A 74-year-old monk, Cicheng Danzeng [Tib: Tsultrim Tenzin], tried to stop police from throwing the images on the ground; a young man working in the monastery, Cicheng Pingcuo [Tib: Tsultrim Phuntsok], aged 25, also made a stand and both were arrested.
The team demanded that all the monks denounce the Dalai Lama; a monk named Yixi Lima [Tib: Yeshe Nyima] voiced his opposition, prompting support from other monks. At about 6.30 pm, the entire monastic body marched down to a nearby river where paramilitary police were encamped and demanded the release of the two men.
Several hundred local villagers joined the monks, enraged at the detention of the 74-year-old monk Cicheng Danzeng, who locals say is well respected in the area. Shouting “Long live the Dalai Lama”, “Let the Dalai Lama come back” and “We want freedom”, the crowd demonstrated until about 9 pm when as many as 1,000 paramilitary police personnel used force to try to end the protest and opened fire on the crowd.
The Times reported, “It was not known if the demonstrators had been throwing stones at the police” [however, this line was omitted from an extended version of this report, published by The Times on 05/04/08. The 05/04/08 version included the subheading, “They cried ‘long live the Dalai Lama’ – then the firing started”, implying that the firing was a direct response to this slogan; however, other than in the subheading, this was not stated in the article].
Eight Tibetans were killed by police gunfire, including:

  1. Cangdan [Tib: Samten], 27, monk
  2. Zhulongcuo [Tib: Druklot Tso?], female
  3. Danluo [Tib: Tenlo], female
  4. Pupu Deley [Tib: Phurbu Delek], 30
  5. The son of a villager named Cangdan
  6. The daughter of a villager named Cuogu
  7. Unidentified
  8. Unidentified

Dozens were wounded.
[Additional comments from an extended version of this report, published by The Times on 05/04/08: The chief monk at Donggu [Tib: Tongkor] monastery had turned away officials on 2 April 2008, but they had returned the following day backed by a squad of paramilitary police. The Times referred to pro-Tibet activists’ claims that the police opened fire when demonstrators, expecting the two detainees to be freed by 8pm, confronted the security at a roadblock outside the monastery. Among those wounded was a Tibetan “with a bullet through the ear” while another had been shot in the shoulder. The Times referred to state-run Chinese media which confirmed that the police resorted to force although this was, according to the Chinese media, only after a government official was attacked and seriously wounded by protesters. Xinhua referred to a riot and rioters, and did not use the word “protesters”; The Times referred to protesters but quoted Xinhua’s comments which included references to “rioters”. The Times noted that Xinhua did not specify how the demonstrators had injured the official.]
(reported by The Times, 04 April 2008)

An official was attacked and seriously injured in a riot in Garze [Ganzi; Tib: Kardze] TAP at about 8 pm when rioters attacked the seat of the Donggu township government of Garze county. An official stated: “Local officials exercised restraint during the riot and repeatedly told the rioters to abide by the law […] police were forced to fire warning shots to put down the violence, since local officials and people were in great danger”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 04 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A monk was beaten to death by PAP personnel. His identity has been confirmed: Gesang, aged 32, from the Tse-soe family, Mehu-ru-ma Thoe-shey village, Ngaba county.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

The authorities are reportedly targeting people in the area with mobile phones and suspected of sending information and photos to the Tibetan exile community, relating to the protests and subsequent crackdown.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngatoe Adue monastery, Ngaba county

A monk of Namtso monastery was reportedly beaten to death by Chinese security personnel.
(reported by TCHRD, 04 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Garthog, Markham county (Chin: Mangkang Xian)

Chogyal, Tenphel and another three monks from Wese monastery allegedly plotted to bomb key county establishments on 3 April (the actual bombing allegedly occurred two days later, on 5 April).
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 05 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Pashoe county

Date unknown: a local abbot intervened to stop a protest linked to the detention of a Tibetan for putting up posters “last week” calling for the Dalai Lama’s return.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The Tibet Commerce newspaper said late Thursday [3 April 2008] that more than 1,000 people had either been caught by police or turned themselves in. Trials of at least some would begin in April, the paper reported, citing the deputy chief of the Lhasa communist party, Wang Xiangming.
[An English language version of the original article could not be found at the time of adding this entry to the database; an AFP report has been used instead.]
(reported by AFP, 04 April 2008)

Dates unspecified in ICT report of 3 April: Work units all over the city have been required to write denunciations of the riots and protests in the city and of the “Dalai Clique”, and support government policies in the TAR.
Some Tibetans taken into custody after 14 March have more recently been released from detention; they had been subjected to aggressive interrogation, as well as being severely beaten in custody and deprived of food and water. Other families have no idea of the whereabouts of their relatives or friends after they were detained.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

Tibet [the TAR] will re-open to tourists from both home and abroad on 1 May the region’s Bureau of Tourism announced on 3 April.
Zhanor, the bureau’s deputy director said “all travel agencies would be allowed to arrange tours, and independent travellers would also be welcome” [Zhanor paraphrased by Xinhua].
Eighty percent of the stores damaged in the 14 March riot have “successively come back into operation” [Xinhua]; the exceptions are “those in the severely inflicted Barkhor Street and Ramoche Temple regions” [Xinhua].
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 03 April 2008)

More of the shops that were damaged or looted in the 14 March riot in Lhasa have re-opened. The TAR government has “promised to exempt the 908 damaged shops from business and corporate income taxes, urban maintenance and construction taxes and educational surcharges. Shop owners will not have to pay personal income tax from March1 this year to April 28, 2010”. Local authorities have allocated 600,000 yuan to seven schools burned in the unrest. The money will go for repairs and new equipment.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 03 April 2008)

  Wednesday, 02 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni Xian)

Hundreds of students from a Tibetan middle school boycotted classes in protest at the recent crackdown on Tibetan protesters in the region. A law enforcement official from the Chone county government was quoted as saying, “The majority of the protesters are good people” but declined to comment further.
(reported by RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Well-bhen township, Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Over 30 monks from Sargoen Tashi Choepel Ling monastery were arrested between 31 March and 2 April; 12 were released after paying a fine of 1,500 yuan. Twenty monks from Thupten Yongdueling monastery were also arrested.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Tsoshar, Tsigorthang (Zhinghe) county (Chin: Xinghai xian)

A notice was issued in Tsoshar declaring a ban of Dalai Lama portraits in homes, and stating that “law-breakers” would be exempt from punishment if follow the “right path”.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Ba-Chodae monastery, Bathang county (Chin: Batang xian)

Local authorities ordered the monks to gather for a meeting at 10am; they were addressed by twenty seven PAP personnel. The monks were required to sign documents denouncing the Dalai Lama, stating that he organised and encouraged the recent protests in Tibet; the monks refused; the police arbitrarily arrested four monks, including Ngonro Yeshe and Jigme Dorjee, the highest Buddhist scholar at the monastery; they were accused of being counter-revolutionaries and taken to Bathang police station. The monastery was reportedly under tight security.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Horpo, Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county

Date unspecified; circa 2 April 2008: About 1,000 Chinese armed police personnel deployed in Horpo.
(reported by a source to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » [Kardze TAP]

Date unspecified; circa 2 April 2008: “Huge contingents” of Chinese armed police are deployed close to the main monasteries in Kham [the specific places referred to in this report are located in Kardze TAP]. Armed police are entering monasteries and ransacking monks’ quarters and the residences of head lamas. Dalai Lama photographs are seized and monks blamed for possessing them. Campaigns launched to criticise the Dalai Lama, showing propaganda films describing the involvement of ‘the Dalai clique’ in the recent unrest; accusing Tibetans of attacking mosques and Chinese shops and restaurants in Lhasa. Senior lamas forced to denounce the Dalai Lama and are not free to move around. Local Tibetans have been warned not to move about after 9pm or they will be detained for three months; warned that when armed police move through the towns, anyone blocking their way may be “killed with no complaints allowed or compensation given”.
(reported by a source to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyitso monastery, Dawu county (Chin: Daofu Xian)

Monks from Nyatso [Nyitso] monastery and laypeople from Tawu county held a protest. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Palyul county (Chin: Baiyu)

Date unspecified, circa 2 April 2008: Two thousand Chinese armed police personnel deployed in Palyul (Chin: Baiyu). The Chinese have ordered the monks to fly the Chinese flag from the roof of Palyul monastery; the monks have not complied.
(reported by sources to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Ratroe nunnery, Tawu county (Chin: Daifu Xian)

Nuns from Ratroe nunnery staged a protest [location of demonstration not provided].
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

At 8am, around 200 nuns of Ratroe nunnery set off on a peaceful procession to express their solidarity with, and pray for those who lost their lives in protests across the Tibetan plateau. During the march they chanted Buddhist prayers such as the Dalai Lama’s long life prayer and Dolma (Tara) prayers. The nuns continued to offer prayers in front of Tawu county government headquarters, where PAP and PSB officers ordered the nuns to return to their nunnery or be forcibly returned. The nuns dispersed and returned to Ratroe nunnery. No details of arrests have emerged.
(reported by TCHRD, 04 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor (Chin: Donggu) monastery, Zithang township, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

An official ‘work team’ arrived to enforce a ‘patriotic education’ campaign; monks were required to denounce the Dalai Lama and oppose ongoing protests across Tibetan regions. The monastery’s chief monk, Lobsang Jamyang, refused to co-operate with the work team; a monk named Yeshi Nyima protested against the campaign and was later joined by other monks who refused to co-operate and stated, “We cannot criticise the Dalai Lama even at the cost of our lives”. Two monks were arrested [not Lobsang Jamyang or Yeshi Nyima].
(reported by TCHRD, 05 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkhor monastery, Tongkhor town, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi xian)

Chinese authorities arrived at Tongkhor monastery to conduct a ‘patriotic re-education’ session. Lobsang Jamyang, the “chant master in charge of the monastery”, refused to co-operate.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

A government delegation visited Tongkhor monastery and attempted to force the monks to denounce the Dalai Lama and recent protests; a senior monk, chant master Lobsang Jamyang, refused to co-operate and called a meeting of the monks and announced that he would not denounce the Dalai Lama, even if it cost him his life; the monks voted to refuse to co-operate with the authorities. Around 3,000 armed police arrived at the monastery during the afternoon.
Police raided the monastery and arrested two monks, Geshi Sonam Tenzing and Tsultrim Phuntsog, for possession of Dalai Lama photographs.
(reported by FTC, 04 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tongkor, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Protests by the monks of Tongkor monastery and local laypeople in Kardze county town on 2 and 3 April. During the protests a number of Tibetans were shot and killed by armed forces.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

Unrest at Tongkor monastery began this week when Chinese authorities launched a ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign aimed at preventing demonstrations. On 2 April, the head lama, Lobsang Jamyang, told the authorities: “We cannot criticize the Dalai Lama, but I will discourage any incidents of protest here”. He called a meeting with the approximately 400 monks; one of them, Yeshe Nyima, stated: “We cannot criticize the Dalai Lama, even at the cost of our lives”. The others agreed. When Lobsang Jamyang recounted this, a police officer’s response was: “We can use the challenge. Tell anyone who wants to rise up to go ahead and rise up, and we will crush them”.

Police searched the monastery; found and destroyed Dalai Lama photographs, and removed photographs of the monastery’s previous head lama, Tongkor Shabdrung. A monk named Tsultrim Tenzin, aged 74, and a lay person identified as Tsultrim Phuntsok, aged 26, were both arrested.
(reported by RFA, 04 April 2008)

Protests by the monks of Tongkor monastery and local laypeople in Kardze county town on 2 and 3 April. During the protests a number of Tibetans were shot and killed by armed forces.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tromtak, Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county

Date unspecified; circa 2 April 2008: About 500 hundred Chinese armed police personnel deployed at “Tromtak Buddhist Center” [?].
[Note: the county is not confirmed; other locations referred to by this source are in Palyul county.]
(reported by a source to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Chamdo (Chin: Qamdo/Changdu)

Local government issued a circular stating that locals should be vigilant and “watch for any Tibetan who comes from the areas of Amdo and Kardze”. According to the government memorandum, local authorities are authorised to detain any Tibetan who enters Chamdo from those two areas. However, this is causing difficulties for Tibetans who travel on business or who work at “day-labour jobs”.
In Chamdo city, there has been no reported unrest; “most of the residents are government workers”; there is a large group of armed police in the town.
(reported by sources to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Circa 2 April: An explosion was reported “close to a town in Gonjo county” where a house used as place of residence by county and sub-district government workers is located. The building was badly damaged. Four explosive devices were later found, only two of which had actually exploded. None of the occupants of the building were hurt.
[note: this incident may have occurred in Gyanbe township on 23 March, as reported by Chinese and then Western media on 13 April 2008.]
(reported by sources to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Ganden monastery, Tagtse county (Chin: Dazi xian)

A few monks were arrested from Gaden [Ganden] monastery “on Wednesday in the beginning of April”.
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

  Tuesday, 01 April 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Labrang Tashikhyil monastery, Labrang (Chin: Xiahe), Sangchu county (Chin: Xiahe Xian)

Seven monks from Labrang monastery are known to have been arrested on 1 April.

  1. Gendun Gyatso, 30
  2. Gyurmey, 40
  3. Gelek Gyurmey, 30
  4. Sangay, 30
  5. Samten, 32
  6. Yonten, 34
  7. Thabkhey, 30

Thabkhey was apparently released after several days’ detention; he is currently mentally unstable and his body was badly bruised as a result of severe beatings. The whereabouts of the other six monks remain unknown.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Luchu county (Luqu Xian)

Date unspecified: Around 70 Tibetans were arrested at the beginning of April and fined 3,000 yuan.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Jyekundo TAP (Chin: Yushu) » Jyekundo county (Chin: Yushu/Jiegu xian)

Date unspecified; early April: Security forces raided each household in Jyekundo (a.k.a Kyegudo) TAP; households with satellite TV facilities had the components confiscated. A circular was issued stating that Tibetans were banned from watching foreign news channels and should watch only state-run news channels.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Siling Municipality (Chin: Xining Shi) » Siling (Chin: Xining)

Chinese authorities arrested Jamyang Kyi, a leading Tibetan writer, television producer, and performer. Plainclothes security officers escorted her from her office at state-owned Qinghai TV; she never returned; speculation that she was detained in a guesthouse for interrogation. According to another source, she was formally arrested by Xining PSB; charges against her unknown. Security personnel reportedly went to Jamyang Kyi’s house and removed her computer, mailing list and contact numbers.
Jamyang Kyi, born in Mangra county, Qinghai, and now aged in her forties, has worked as a producer in the Tibetan language section of Qinghai TV for two decades; she is also a singer and songwriter and has released several well-received albums (a music CD and two VCDs). Kyi is well known among Tibetans as an activist on women’s issues; she toured the United States to sing and lecture in 2006. Her blog is popular among young Tibetans, although she had stopped updating it several months before the protests erupted in Lhasa in mid-March.
This is reportedly the first time she has been detained; the specific reason for her arrest is unclear; however, authorities are questioning numerous Tibetans who have travelled internationally in recent years.
(reported by RFA, 15 April 2008)

The whereabouts of Jamyang Kyi, Qinghai television presenter, renowned singer and feminist, is no known following her arrest on 1 April in Siling Municipality, after which police searched her house thoroughly, including her personal computer.
(reported by CTA, 16 April 2008)

Jamyang Kyi, a well-known singer, TV presenter and producer, was arrested at her work place, the Qinghai TV station, and held incommunicado for at least one month before, it is believed, being placed under house arrest, though only after paying a significant fee.
(reported by AI, 18 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Jha-khyung monastery, Bayan (Palung; Chin: Hualong) Hui AC

Date unspecified; early April: Authorities anticipated possible demonstrations at Jha-khyung monastery and sent ‘work teams’ to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes; all but around ten monks fled the monastery. Armed personnel arrived at the monastery and imposed tight restrictions.
(reported by CTA, 16 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsoshar TAP (Chin: Haidong) » Taktser, Tsongkhakhar county (Chin: Pingan xian)

Date unspecified; reported by CTA along with incidents of 2 April: The house in which the Dalai Lama was born was “locked down by Chinese authorities”.
(reported by CTA, 15 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dartsedo county (Chin: Kangding Xian)

Date unspecified; early April: Sangpo, a student monk from Nangten school, waved the Tibetan flag while shouting slogans; he was arrested by the police.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Date unspecified; early April: A Tibetan man named Yeshe, who fled after a scuffle with the township head on 26 March, was arrested by police in early April [see also entry for Chokri Getse township, 28 March 2008].
(reported by CTA, 23 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzagonsar monastery, Tehor, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Dates unspecified: Many Chinese soldiers were stationed round Dzagonsar monastery in Tihor [Tehor] township in April; they expelled all monks from the monastery for five days.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

At least 15 policemen from Derge County police station came to Tehor [Tehor] township to enforce a ‘patriotic re-education’ campaign, which required local Tibetans to denounce and criticise the Dalai Lama, and sign [statements declaring that he is] a separatist.
All monks refused to sign their names and rejected the local authority’s orders to raise the Chinese flag over Dzagonsar monastery.
[See also Tehor, 1 April 2008; Tibet Watch, 01/07/08.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian)

Date unconfirmed: Nyima Wangmo and Gonpo Lhamo, “sisters from Drakgonpa nunnery”, were arrested in April by Kandze [Kardze] county police. Their current whereabouts no known. They are from Gyokhang-nang village in Thingka township, Kandze [Kardze] county, and had joined protests in Kandze [Kardze] town in March.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Mi-nyak Lhagung Acha Rusar village, Dartsedo county (Chin: Kangding Xian)

Date unspecified; early April: a convoy of military vehicles arrived in the village. A local named Lhakpa waved a Tibetan flag and shouted slogans: “His Holiness the Dalai Lama should be welcomed back to Tibet” and “Tibet is an independent country”. Others joined in to support Lhakpa, who was then arrested; his whereabouts are unknown.
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Pang Na Tashi Gepheling nunnery (Pang-ri nunnery), Su-ngo township

Date unspecified: Following the March protests in Tibet, local government officials and police held several ‘patriotic re-education’ sessions at Pangrina [Pangri-Na] nunnery. The nuns refused to denounce the Dalai Lama or accept that he orchestrated the protests in Tibet, and would not sign statements denouncing him as a separatist. Instead, the nuns held a “spontaneous secret meeting” where they unanimously decided they would die rather than denounce the Dalai Lama. They decided to protest against the Chinese government, even if this resulted in their deaths or imprisonment.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Samtenling nunnery, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

May 2008; exact date unknown: the nuns of Samtenling nunnery defied the ‘work teams’ conducting ‘patriotic education’ in the nunnery by hanging prayer flags stamped with the slogan “Tibetan independence” for some half a mile.
(reported by Tibetan Solidarity Committee, 09 June 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tehor, Derge (Chin: Dege) county

Dates unspecified: Many Chinese soldiers were stationed round Dzagonsar monastery in Tihor [Tehor] township in April.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Tehor township, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

No date specified; following 24 March demonstration: the authorities began circulating a petition stating:

  1. I protest against any engagement in “splittist” activities, and I owe loyalty to the ‘Motherland’.
  2. I reject any support for the return of the Dalai Lama.

In Sok-gen, Dzong-go and Dhilgo towns [villages?], in Tehor township, some people were duped into signing the petition, believing that their signatures were needed for the release of two senior monks from Chokri monastery who were arrested on 26 March. However, when it became understood what the signatures were being used for, no more were provided. There were also attempts to convince Tibetans that the recent demonstrations, including those in Lhasa, were instigated by the Dalai Lama.
(reported by CTA, 11 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Gonjo county (Chin: Gongjue Xian)

Three monks arrested [believed to be from Thang-kya monastery].
(reported by CTA, 12 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: since the beginning of April, PSB officials visited each household in Lhasa and took a register of each family member, and the addresses and phone numbers of family members who were not present. Non-residents of Lhasa such as pilgrims or businessmen and women were arrested and handed over to local police from their home regions.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

An agent with the Xinzhe Xibuyou travel agency in Lhasa, who gave only his surname, Yang, said: “The Tourism Bureau has forbidden all tourist groups to come into Tibet” and that the Bureau had called a meeting for later on Tuesday to discuss restarting the travel business.
State media has released the names of 14 of the 18 civilians and one police officer it says were killed in the Lhasa riots.
(reported by AP, 01 April 2008)

Two suspects arrested for their alleged involvement in two arson cases in Lhasa on 14 March:

  1. Tanzen, male, aged 27.
  2. Losang Gyaltsen, male, aged 27.

[See Lhasa, Friday 14 March 2008, Chinaview (Xinhuanet) 01/04/08].
Wu Heping, spokesman for China’s Ministry of Public Security, said “Both suspects have confessed to their crimes” [Wu Heping]; “The suspects are closely connected with the Dalai clique” [Wu Heping].
Wu revealed that the “capture had led to the discovery of a domestic network of an official from the ‘security ministry’ of the Dalai Lama clique” [Wu Heping paraphrased by Xinhua].
Police have captured the primary suspects who allegedly organised, planned and participated in the violence on 14 March.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 01 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Date unspecified, circa 1 April: Due to the number of arrests in Phenpo Lhundrup county during March 2008 and a lack of space [the location of this detention centre is not stated], many of those detained have been moved to Toelung county prison.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

A 31-year-old farmer named Dawa from Dedrong village, Jangkha township, died on 1 April after being tortured by Chinese prison guards. He had been arrested while participating in a peaceful protest in Phenpo county on 15 March, and spent two weeks in detention. His health was in a critical condition as a result of torture when the Chinese prison authorities released him on 27 March for medical treatment. He died after spending four days in hospital. The authorities charged the deceased’s family with a fine of 1,000 yuan (US $125) for “causing destruction to public property and bringing damages to economy”.
(reported by TCHRD, 02 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Shar Bumpa nunnery, Phenpo Lhundrup county (Chin: Lingzhi Xian)

Date unspecified: “From the first week of April, the Chinese army has started arresting nuns from the Shar Bhumpa nunnery”. Only seven of Shar Bumpa’s sixty nuns remain. A nun named Tsering Lhathog, who has a hearing problem, was brutally beaten and tortured; admitted to Jang Ga-shang Hospital with severe head injuries [date unspecified; some time between 1 and 17 April].
(reported by CTA, 17 April 2008)

Date unconfirmed; believed to be between mid March and mid April: Reportedly, 62 nuns removed from Shar Bumpa nunnery; some imprisoned, others staying with relatives, several of whom require medical attention following beatings by security personnel but refused treatment in hospital or local clinics. An elderly nun named Tsering Lhadock [Lhathog] who is partially deaf, was interrogated and beaten; her skull was broken and she was hospitalised. Two elderly nuns remain at Shar Bumpa nunnery.
(reported by sources to TibetInfoNet, 09 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Shugsib nunnery, Tselnashang, Chushur county (Chin: Chushui xian)

Date unspecified: During the beginning of April, officials from the ‘work teams’ [present at the nunnery] “forced and harassed” the nuns to denounce the Dalai Lama. In response to this, the nuns later protested [see Chushur county, 28 April 2008; CTA 02/05/08.]
(reported by CTA, 05 May 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Shigatse Prefecture (Chin: Rigaze) » Drakmar village, Dingri county (Chin: Dingri xian)

Date unspecified; early April: Seven businessmen were returning from Solu-Khumbu when five were arrested by the security forces in Drakmar village; local police arrested the other two after they arrived home [presumably Drakmar village]. Their families learnt that they were not being held locally, although their whereabouts and the reason for their arrest were not known.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Yunnan Province » Dechen TAP (Chin: Deqin) » Gyalthang county (Chin: Zhongdian Xian)

Date unspecified: in early April, many posters were distributed in Gyalthang county carrying the message “Through happiness and sorrow, we stand together”.
(reported by CTA, 11 April 2008)

  Monday, 31 March 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Choephel Tashi Chokor-ling monastery, Dokhor town, Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni xian)

Dates unspecified: During March, over 200 monks from Choephel Tashi Chokor-ling monastery were arrested. They were also fined 5,000 yuan.
(reported by CTA, 22 April 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » [Kanlho TAP]

Dates unspecified: More than 2,000 people were detained in Gannan [not stated whether Gannan town or Gannan TAP as a whole] in March, with all but a few hundred released within a month. Some of those still in detention [as of June 2008] were charged with “intent to kill” after burning local police stations or government guesthouses.
(reported by Reuters, 13 June 2008)

  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Well-bhen township, Machu county (Chin: Maqu Xian)

Monks from Sargoen Tashi Choepel Ling monastery were arrested [for more details, see entry for Well-bhen township, 2 April 2008].
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Machen (Chin: Maqin/Dawu), Machen county (Chin: Maqin Xian)

In addition to reports that authorities have arrested Tibetan feminist and writer Jamyang Kyi, Tibetans say five other Qinghai Tibetan community leaders are also in custody; all are residents of Machen [Chin: Maqin] county:

  1. Golog Dape, a popular comedian, leader of the Gangchen performance group, and animal rights activist.
  2. Dolma Kyi, a singer, activist, and founder of the folk-music company Gangchen Metok.
  3. Palchen Kyab, principal of the private Mayul Dargye school, founded with donations from Tibetan nomads.
  4. Lhundrup, Mayul Dargye school’s assistant principal.
  5. Sonam Dorje, a teacher.

They were taken into custody on 31 March by “Golok prefecture State Security Bureau” officers and are being held Xining [Tib: Siling]. No available information regarding charges against them; no relatives have been allowed to visit; an official at the Golok prefecture Public Security Bureau refused to comment, referred questions to her superior, who also refused to comment and hung up.
(reported by RFA, 17 April 2008)

Dape, a Tibetan artist, was arrested in Qinghai province. He was later released [date not stated] in return for 10,000 yuan.
[Note: Tibet Watch had erroneously reported this incident under the heading of Golog TAP, Sichuan Province – Qinghai Province is correct.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Machen County (Chin: Maqin)

Singer Drolma Kyi, arrested “at the same time” as Dape [a Tibetan artist arrested on 31 March; Drolma Kyi was arrested on 30 March according to other sources], for singing songs praising the Dalai Lama. Her family have yet to be issued with a notice of arrest, due after 37 days of detention according to Chinese law, and remains imprisoned [at the time of reporting by Tibet Watch]. Her family “cannot afford to pay such a large fine” [Tibet Watch is referring to 10,000 yuan paid for the release of Dape, a Tibetan artist].
Drolma Kyi is the main carer for her three children and elderly mother.
[Note: Tibet Watch had erroneously reported this incident under the heading of Golog TAP, Sichuan Province – Qinghai Province is correct.]
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dzokchen monastery, Palyul (Chin: Baiyu) county

Date unspecified: a “huge number of Chinese forces” have arrived [been present] at Dzokchen monastery since March.
(reported by CTA, 26 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Wara monastery, Jomda (Chin: Jiangda) county

A crowd gathered after a quarrel between some young Tibetans and Chinese shop-keepers; monks from Wara monastery joined local laypeople in a protest; called for the Dalai Lama to return to Tibet. A senior lama persuaded monks and laypeople to stop protesting and calmed the situation. There has now been a security build-up in the town.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Woenpo monastery, Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu Xian)

Date unspecified: towards the end of March, a number of arrests of monks and laypeople were made at Voenpo [Woenpo] monastery. A large contingent of armed forces arrived; conducted thorough searches of all the monks’ quarters; some monks beaten for possessing the Tibetan flag and other “unpatriotic” items. Numerous statues and computers owned by the monastery were confiscated. The monastery was placed under tight restrictions.
(reported by CTA, 07 April 2008)

Government officials arrived at Voenpo [Woenpo] monastery to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. Eight monks and lay people were arrested for alleged “involvement, leading and masterminding” of the demonstrations in Lhasa in March; they were told that the authorities have documents linking them to the demonstrations.
(reported by CTA, 09 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Mama nunnery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba xian)

Date unspecified; March 2008: Jamyang Tsultrim, a nun from Mama nunnery and originally from A-jong village, was imprisoned. She was told to stamp on a portrait of the Dalai Lama; she refused and as a result was severely beaten [it is presumed that this incident happened before her arrest]. Her current status and whereabouts are unknown.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Date unspecified; March 2008: Two monks from Kirti monastery, Tenzin and Lobsang Choedher (Kunchok), both former political prisoners, were injured and arrested during protests in Ngaba county; subjected to harsh treatment by the authorities.
A ‘wanted’ list was circulated, which included the names of three Kirti monastery monks – Lobsang Jinpa, Koenpae and Lobsang Phuntsok. It was announced that harsh sentencing would follow their arrests.

(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

Dates unspecified: CTA reported the following arrests which occurred in March:

  • Eighteen people from Lota township, Ngaba county.
  • Five people from Akham (Akhyam) township, Ngaba county.

Their whereabouts unknown as of 28 July.
(reported by CTA, 28 July 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Taktsang Lhamo, Ngaba county

Exact date unknown, but prior to 31 March; exact location unknown, but described as “the town near Kirti monastery, Ngaba county”, so presumably Taktsang Lhamo. Many lay Tibetans have been detained; about 30 lay Tibetans were put into a police truck and paraded in the local town.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Date unspecified: Ngawang Palsang, a former monk of Lo monastery in Taktse [Tagtse] county, was arrested in March by Lhasa city PSB.
Ngawang Palsang, a.k.a. Lama of Lo monastery, was born in Taktse [Tagtse] county. In 1993, he had bad been “imprisoned and tortured for six years” in Drapchi Prison for his involvement in political activities. Since his release, he had been studying Tibetan medicine and astrology in Lhasa.
(reported by CTA, 02 July 2008)

Date unspecified: Passang (a.k.a. Tenzin Namgyal), a monk from Phagmo monastery in Taktse [Tagtse county], was arrested in March by Lhasa city PSB and severely tortured in prison.
(reported by CTA, 02 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Drachen county (Chin: Baqing Xian)

Date unspecified: “Following the March protests”, the Chinese authorities deployed a “huge contingent of forces and work teams” in Nagchu Prefecture, including in Drachen county, and intensified ‘patriotic re-education’ campaigns.
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Driru county (Chin: Biru Xian)

Date unspecified: “Following the March protests”, the Chinese authorities deployed a “huge contingent of forces and work teams” in Nagchu Prefecture, including in Driru county, and intensified ‘patriotic re-education’ campaigns.
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Gyalsho Bekar monastery, Bekar township, Driru (Chin: Biru) county

Date unspecified: two monks from Gyalsho Bhenkar [Gyalsho Bekar] monastery were sentenced to two years in prison in March:

  1. Drakpa Gyaltsen.
  2. Naymay.
    (reported by CTA, 15 July 2008)
  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Sog county (Chin: Suo Xian)

Date unspecified: “Following the March protests”, the Chinese authorities deployed a “huge contingent of forces and work teams” in Nagchu Prefecture, including in Sog Dzong [Sog county], and intensified ‘patriotic re-education’ campaigns.
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Tarma monastery, Driru county (Chin: Biru Xian)

Date unspecified: When work teams conducted ‘patriotic re-education’ classes at Tarmo monastery in March, which included denouncing the Dalai Lama, the abbot Ngawang Jampa confronted the work team, saying: “As we follow Buddha Dharma with the Dalai Lama as our root guru, we cannot denounce him. He should be welcomed back to Tibet”.
The work teams could not arrest him immediately due to the presence of a large number of monks, but warned that his offense would be dealt when they will again conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ from 1 July.
[See also Nagchu county, 18 June 2008; CTA 01/07/08.]
(reported by CTA, 01 July 2008)

  Yunnan Province » Dechen TAP (Chin: Deqin) » Gyalthang county (Chin: Zhongdian Xian)

Date unspecified, late March: Four young Tibetan tourist guides from the Amdo region of Tibet were arrested in Gyalthang county for allegedly passing information to the outside world via the internet.
(reported by CTA, 25 April 2008)

  Sunday, 30 March 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni Xian)

Following the deployment to the area of armed police from the central Chinese city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, to “keep the peace”, armed police are “trying to arrest Tibetans who remain at large. There are still some sporadic riots”, a Chinese resident told RFA.
(reported by RFA, 02 April 2008)

A witness told RFA that an armed forces division from Wuhan, in Hubei province, has been deployed to Chone county; armed police are trying to arrest Tibetans who remain at large. Sporadic riots continue.
(reported by RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Chigdril county (Chin: Jiuzhi Xian)

Circa 30 March, armed police were reported in large numbers in Chigdril county.
(reported by RFA, 02 April 2008)

More troops, reportedly PAP, arrived in recent days and deployed in both urban and rural areas. About 30 to 40 people were detained; many of them are local nomads; some turned themselves in, others were arrested. Several soldiers on patrol were attacked by nomads on one occasion in recent days. A Tibetan told RFA: “I have been asked to write down my opinions about the riots and to write a condemnation of the Dalai Lama. Many other businessmen have been told to do the same. Of course you cannot write down whatever you want”.
(reported by RFA, 30 March 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Machen (Chin: Maqin/Dawu), Machen county (Chin: Maqin Xian)

Drolmakyi, a Tibet folk singer, was arrested as she was hanging laundry from the balcony of her apartment; detained with no formal charges. The 31-year-old single mother of three children and member of the local government council had opened the only live music venue in Dawu last autumn; she also used the club as a training centre for illiterate Tibetan women, teaching them to sing in order to gain financial independence. Drolmakyi had reportedly sketched a Tibetan flag to use in one of her nightclub acts.
(reported by LA Times, 08 June 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Malho TAP (Chin: Huangnan) » Chentsa County Nationalities Middle School, Chentsa county (Chin: Jianza Xian)

Four or five students lowered and burned the Chinese flag, and replaced it with the Tibetan flag; they were later suspended from school.
(reported by CTA, 14 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Chabcha county (Chin: Gonghe Xian)

Students from a teachers’ training school held a peaceful demonstration at around 11pm. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 03 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Chabcha township (Chin: Gonghe)

Students from a teachers’ training school held a peaceful demonstration around 11pm. No further details available.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Derge county (Chin: Dege Xian)

Date unspecified, circa 30 March 2008: Troops were deployed in Derge county.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Circa 30 March, armed police were reported in large numbers in Drango (Draggo) county.
(reported by RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Kardze, Kardze county (Chin: Ganzi Xian) (Chin: Ganzi)

A government official who had confirmed riots in the area during a phone conversation with RFA, spoke to RFA again and stated: “I was punished for taking that interview”.
(reported by RFA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Sershul Dzong

Since 14 March 2008, “over 3,000 Chinese military forces have been stationed mainly around the three monasteries of Kham Za Chukha”.
(reported by Phayul, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Shiwa Lhathim monastery, Raloong township, Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong xian)

Monks began a protest march towards the county government headquarters but were stopped en route by Chinese security forces and sent back to their monastery.
Shiwa Lhathim monastery is surrounded by Chinese security forces; the local people sent a letter to the relevant office warning that if the suppression at the monastery continued, the people would hold a “massive demonstration”.
(reported by CTA, 05 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Achok Tse-nyi monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Achok Tse-nyi monastery was searched by PAP personnel; a group of monks were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Atob monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Exact date unknown, but reports reached India on 30 March that Atob monastery had been raided and 17 monks detained, their whereabouts unknown.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Gomang monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Date unspecified, circa 30 March 2008: Gomang monastery was searched recently by PAP personnel; 16 monks arrested.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

PAP and PSB personnel raided residences of monks at Gomang monastery; at least 20 monks were arrested (in addition to the 15 to 20 monks of the same monastery had previously been arrested during a protest in Ngaba county).
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

Legtsok, a 75-year-old monk committed suicide. A few days previously, while en route to perform prayer rituals for a Tibetan family, he encountered a large contingent of Chinese forces who beat him severely; he was detained for “a few days” and then returned to Gomang monastery where he told two students that he could not bear to live under such oppression. [note: CTA reported that Legtsok’s suicide occurred on 27 March, on the same day as the suicide of a Kirti monastery monk; TCHRD more clearly reported that the Kirti monastery suicide occurred on 27 March and Legtsok committed suicide on 30 March.]
(reported by CTA, 05 April 2008)

A 72-year-old from “Guomang temple”, apparently upset after being detained while en route to a religious ceremony with his disciples, returned to his monastery and killed himself [date unspecified by Times Online; other reports indicate circa March].

(reported by The Times, 04 April 2008)

A Gomang monastery monk named Legtsok (originally from a small hamlet in the upper flank of Ngaba Prefecture) committed suicide on 30 March. He was 75 years old. Several days before his suicide, Legtsok and two other monks were en route to perform prayer rituals at a Tibetan home when they encountered a large contingent of Chinese security personnel heading towards Gomang monastery. Legtsok was beaten and detained for several days before being released and sent back to Gomang monastery. On 30 March he sent two of his disciples on an errand to return some money previously left with him for safe keeping by other disciples and relatives. Minutes after their departure he committed suicide. He had repeatedly told his disciples that he couldn’t bear the oppression any longer.
(reported by TCHRD, 04 April 2008)

Exact date unknown, but reports reached India on 30 March that 16 monks were detained after police raided the monastery including the monks’ quarters.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

On 29 and 30 March, PAP personnel photographed monks forced to hold portraits of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan flag; off-camera, monks were severely beaten.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

Between 28 and 30 March, around 572 monks including 10-year-olds, have been arbitrarily arrested.
(reported by Kirti monastery (Dharamsala, India), 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Taktsang Lhamo, Dzoege county (Chin: Ruoergai Xian)

Exact date unknown, but reports reached India on 30 March that many plain-clothed officials and police had arrived at Taktsang Lama Kirti monastery and detained 17 monks.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba Buddhist School of Dialectics, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Many monks reportedly detained and taken away.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » [Ngaba TAP]

Reports reached India on 30 March that while medical facilities have always been scarce, under current restrictions of movement, both monks and lay Tibetans are being denied access to medical treatment; those injured in the crackdown are afraid to go for treatment. Shortages of food are severe; Tibetans are not allowed to move around to procure their daily needs.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngamey Dongri monastery, Ngaba county

PAP and PSB officers arrested at least 20 monks of Ngamey Dongri monastery, a branch of Kirti monastery. A few Tibetans reportedly surrendered to the authorities although no details available [TCHRD’s report suggests these incidents relate to Ngamey Dongri monastery, although it is unclear]; several elderly people in the area were allegedly beaten with rifle butts by PAP and PSB personnel [again, TCHRD’s report suggests these incidents occurred in the vicinity of Ngamey Dongri monastery, but they may have occurred in the wider Ngaba area].
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, Dzoge county (Chin: Ruanggui/Zoige Xian)

Each monk’s quarters were thoroughly searched by PAP personnel.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

Around 80 Chinese government officials and a large number of PAP forces carried out sudden raids again in Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery. Details of arrests unknown. Symbolic ceremonial weapons hung on the statues of protector deities inside the monastery were reportedly confiscated amid allegations of their use as weapons by Tibetan protestors. There are shortages of food, water and medical attention in the monastery following successive protests in the area.
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Wara monastery, Jomda county (Chin: Jiangda Xian)

The monks of Wara monastery led a demonstration; the county officials asked a senior lama from the monastery to stop the protestors; the demonstration ended temporarily. No further details were available.
Troops were deployed in Jomda county.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Lhasa municipal government officials described the city as calm on Sunday; text messages sent to residents telling them not to “believe or pass on rumours of unrest”.
(reported by CNN, 30 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Nyimaling monastery, Gyalchen township, Sog county (Chin: Suo Xian)

No date specified; circa 30 March: Local police arrested five monks from Nyimaling monastery, who had protested against ‘work teams’ during enforced ‘patriotic re-education’ classes.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Saturday, 29 March 2008
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

In the previous few days, three Tibetans detained in the area:

  1. Karma, a layperson from Gorong village.
  2. Choedak, a monk from Khuyu village.
  3. Rigzin, a monk from Jhangdrong village.
    (reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Shiwa Lhathim monastery, Raloong township, Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong xian)

Chinese work teams arrived at Shiwa monastery, home to around 160 monks, to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. During a class, monks shouted slogans such as “Free Tibet” and “His Holiness the Dalai Lama should be welcomed to Tibet”. Around 200 military personnel arrived at the monastery to suppress the monks. No further information available.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Shukyul village, Draggo county (Chin: Luhuo xian)

“Six trucks of Chinese military soldiers” stationed in Shukyul village; checking houses for Dalai Lama photographs.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Adhue monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A group of monks were arrested while PAP personnel searched Adhue monastery.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Following a two day raid on monks’ residences in Kirti monastery by PAP and PSB personnel on 28 and 29 March, 572 monks were arrested including novices as young as ten years of age. In particular, monks with modern communication technology products such as mobile phones, cameras, computers or MP3 players were known to have been arrested under suspicion of having communicated with the exile Tibetan communities. According to reports, security forces took advantage by “taking away valuable items from monks’ residences”, suggesting that these confiscated items were kept by individuals assigned to the security forces. The PAP and PSB reportedly ransacked every room of the monastery “baring every box and cupboard with rifle butts” and “forced monks to step over the portraits of the Dalai Lama found in monks’ residences”. Furthermore, the security personnel photographed monks holding banned Tibetan flags and Dalai Lama portraits, as evidence of their "crimes"a. Symbolic ceremonial weapons hung on the statues of protector deities inside the monastery were reportedly confiscated amid allegations of their use as weapons by Tibetan protestors.
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

“Three to four busloads” of monks from Kirti monastery arrested during a security build-up in the area.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

According to the Chinese government, a weapons cache was found; however, it is not uncommon for monasteries in Tibet to hold weapons which have been surrendered by “ordinary Tibetans” upon taking vows not to commit any unvirtuous actions such as hunting or fighting in future.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

As of 29 March, over 500 monks had been taken away from Kirti monastery after several hundred armed police raided and searched the monastery; several photographs of the Dalai Lama were “smashed and ground under their feet”.
(reported by sources to RFA, 31 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Taktsang Lhamo, Dzoege county (Chin: Ruoergai Xian)

Around 17 monks were arbitrarily arrested; nobody knows their whereabouts after morning raids. 80 PRC staff members [?] with security forces raided the monk’s rooms, confiscated knives, arrows, and antique guns that were on display in the chapel of the monastery’s protector deity. Monks are concerned that these items – ancient traditional offerings to the protectors, symbolising the overcoming of obstacles and negative emotions – are being misrepresented in PRC propaganda as ‘evidence’ of monks taking up arms. Xinhua reported that other weapons were also seized, which the monks claim is completely fabricated.
(reported by Kirti monastery (Dharamsala, India), 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngatoe Adue monastery, Ngaba county

PAP and PSB personnel raided all residences of monks at Ngatoe Adue monastery. No further information available.
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, Dzoge county (Chin: Ruanggui/Zoige Xian)

17 monks were arrested by PAP personnel.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

PAP and PSB personnel raided residences of monks at Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, a branch of Ngaba Kirti monastery, at around dusk. Scores of monks were arrested (identities of 19 currently known).
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Zigar monastery, Jomda county (Chin: Jiangda Xian)

Posters were pasted on streets and walls near Zigar monastery, calling for a free Tibet and for China to leave Tibet. When news of the posters reached the authorities, troops arrived at Zigar monastery and “imposed restrictions”.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

A 15-member group of diplomats from countries including the USA, Japan, and Slovenia left Tibet following a stage-managed and controlled visit at the invitation of the Chinese government. Their movements had been tightly restricted by the authorities. Following their departure, authorities tightened security still further in the Jokhang area.
(reported by ICT, 30 March 2008)

Fifteen-member foreign diplomat delegation’s second day in Lhasa: on Saturday morning, the delegation visited the Jokhang temple and “talked with a monk”; visited wounded police and other patients at local hospitals. The diplomats also talked to “ordinary Tibetans whose lives have been severely affected by the 14 March riot, as well as some foreigners who live in Lhasa”.
The diplomats returned to Beijing late Saturday evening.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 29 March 2008)

Panic and fear broke out on Saturday afternoon in the Barkhor area after armed police moved in to check the identity papers of people where rioting occurred on 14 March. People started running in all directions, and shouting, and Tibetan shops in the area were closed down as armed police surrounded the areas around the Ramoche and Jokhang temples. Reportedly, a new, peaceful protest occurred involving many Tibetans, possibly linked to an attempt by armed police to detain Tibetans in the Tibetan neighbourhood around the Ramoche and Jokhang temples.

A text message was sent to cellphone users in Lhasa during the afternoon by the Lhasa Municipal Police which stated: “On the afternoon of 29th in our city, as the security department were carrying out checks, this caused some frightened citizens whose identification [documents] are not clear to run away. Please obey the law and please follow the rules, don’t create rumours, don’t believe rumours”.

The incident occurred just after a 15-member group of diplomats from countries including the USA, Japan, and Slovenia left Tibet. Tibetans in Lhasa had reportedly been aware of the delegation’s presence.
(reported by ICT, 30 March 2008)

At around 2pm, Tibetans gathered for a demonstration in front of Ramoche temple. Nearby, in front of the Tsuglag-khang (Jokhang) temple and on Beijing East Road, protests began; thousands quickly joined in. Chinese armoured vehicles and tanks were brought in to forcefully stop the protests.
(reported by CTA, 29 March 2008)

A melee erupted during afternoon in the midst of hundreds of armed police who have been out in force since deadly rioting rocked the city two weeks ago. Armed police reportedly began massing shortly before 2pm to check identity papers of people in the area where the 14 March riot started; many Tibetans ran away rather than risk arrest. Security forces surrounded residential areas near the Ramoche and Jokhang temples; several hundred Tibetans staged a rally. Rumours spread of a riot breaking out; some shops closed; cellphone signals had been cut; one witness stated “everybody was in a panic” but saw no protests and streets seemed empty. Lhasa municipal police sent a text message to residents’ cellphones during the evening stating: “Currently the social order in our city is nothing abnormal”.
(reported by Washington Post Foreign Service, 29 March 2008)

Jampa Lhamo, aged 45, born in Khyungpo Tengcheng [Dengchen (Chin: Dingqing)] county, Chamdo Prefecture, TAR, and a permanent resident of Ramoche, Lhasa, was detained on 29 March.
[See also Lhasa, 28 November 2008; CTA, 22/12/08.]
(reported by CTA, 22 December 2008)

Armed troops and security were ‘hidden’ in compounds during the visit of diplomats.
(reported by ICT, 16 April 2008)

Large protests took place at around 2pm despite the presence of thousands of armed police in the streets; hundreds of demonstrators gathered around the Ramoche temple and close to the Jokhang temple. The protests were reportedly peaceful with no attacks on Chinese businesses; however, shops, restaurants and other business premises in “the eastern quarters” of Lhasa were reportedly closed. Armed police quickly suppressed the protests. A text message in Chinese was sent to all mobile phone users in Lhasa city; it read:
“In the afternoon of 29 March, when the Lhasa Municipal Law Enforcement Department Personnel were conducting a security check, some mobile salesmen and some other people started running away without knowing exactly what the Security Personnel were doing. There was no unstable social order in the city. Please township people, do not believe the rumo[u]rs. Be relieved and stay working. Be clear to the rights and wrongs. Obey the law. Keep the rules. Criminal actions such as creating and spreading rumo[u]rs, persuading others to do wrongs, disturbing social order and sabotaging social stability, will be severely cracked down upon. Announced by Lhasa Municipal Police Station”.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

Despite a massive Chinese police and paramilitary presence, protests erupted when several hundred Tibetans rallied around 2pm near Center Beijing Road. Shops near the central post ofice on Lhasa Youth Road were closed, as security forces surrounded the Tibetan residential neighbourhoods in Barkhor, Kama Kunsang, Ramoche, and the Jokhang temple areas. A witness reported that “People were running in every direction […] It was a huge protest and people were shouting.”
Another source reported seeing “fistfights”. The protest continued for several hours. Local government subsequently sent mass text messages using local cell phone companies to announce that the situation was under control and to warn against the influence of “divisive-sounding news and gossip”. The protest coincided with a day-long visit by foreign diplomats invited by the Chinese authorities.
(reported by RFA, 29 March 2008)

Military checkpoints have been established at every intersection of every major road, but during the 28-29 March visits of the foreign media and diplomatic missions, military personnel and vehicles were kept out of sight. When the diplomats left Lhasa at around 1 pm on Saturday, security was built up again in the Barkhor area. A protest involving at least 80 people occurred in the Barkhor area that afternoon; it appeared to have been timed to coincide with the diplomats’ visit, but instead occurred after they left.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

The Chinese government said the families of those [19 ] killed will each receive $28,500.
(reported by Washington Post Foreign Service, 29 March 2008)

A large peaceful demonstration occurred at 2pm around the Barkor area and Ramoche temple, involving hundreds of protestors despite the presence of thousands of armed police who eventually suppressed the demonstration. Meanwhile, shops, restaurants and other businesses in eastern Lhasa were closed.

Shortly after the demonstration, a text message written in Chinese was sent by Lhasa city PSB to “every mobile phone in Lhasa”. According to FTC’s translation, the text message stated:

“In the after – noon [sic] on the 29th, March, when the Lhasa Municipal Law Enforcement Department Personals [sic] were conducting a security line-check, some mobile salesmen and some other people started running away without knowing exactly what Security personals [sic] were doing. But there was no unstable social order in the city. Please township people, do not believe the rumo[u]rs. Be relieved and stay working. Be clear to the rights and wrongs. Obey the law. Keep the rules. Criminal actions such as creating and spreading rumo[u]rs, persuading others to doing [sic] wrongs, disturbing social [sic] and sabotaging social stability, will be severely cracked down upon. Announced by Lhasa Municipal Police Station”.
(reported by FTC, 31 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Nagchu Prefecture

No date specified; circa 29 March 2008: In Nagchu prefecture, non-residents are being forced to leave.
(reported by CTA, 29 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Tarma monastery, Driru county (Chin: Biru Xian)

No date specified; circa 29 March 2008: Chinese work teams arrived in Tarma monastery, Driru county, to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. During a class the head of the monastery, Ngawang Gyaltan, called on Tibetans to unite; called for the return of the Dalai Lama; rejected the ‘patriotic re-education’ classes. Ngawang Gyaltan received much support from other monks as well as laypeople. Tarma monastery was under tight restrictions.
(reported by CTA, 29 March 2008)

  Friday, 28 March 2008
  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Hongke, Dari (Jimai) county (Chin: Darlag Xian)

Xinhua reported: “a handful of people alleged to be insurgents seeking ‘Tibetan independence’ incited herders in Hongke town, Dari county, to riot on 21 March […] after a month-long investigation, the police moved on Monday to arrest the suspected leader. The suspect resisted arrest and gunfire broke out”.
Lama Cedain, a Tibetan police officer in charge of criminal investigations in the Dari county PSB was shot dead during the pursuit of the alleged “riot leader”. The policeman was wounded six times and died at 6:30 a.m. on Monday. Other officers “returned fire, killing the suspect”.

(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 30 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Holkha township, Tsigorthang county (Chin: Xinghai Xian)

In response to protests in front of the township government building on 27 March, around five hundred “Chinese military soldiers” were deployed between 3 and 4am on 28 March to prevent further protest.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Chogri monastery, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Three monks from Chokri monastery, whom the authorities have blamed for leading the demonstrations in Draggo county on 24 March, have been warned by the Chinese authorities that, upon arrest, they would face harsh legal consequences for their involvement in demonstrations. The whereabouts of the three monks was unknown; they are:

  1. Rigzin, from Jhang-drong village, Draggo county.
  2. Choedak, from Khuyu-boor village, Draggo county.
  3. Karma, from Gorong village, Draggo county.
    (reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)
  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Chokri Shuk-yul village, Draggo (Drango) county

Six truckloads of military personnel arrived in Chokri Shuk-yul village and arrested many people.
(reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Dege monastery

Armed police searched the monks’ rooms for Dalai Lama photographs and other materials, and closed off the monastery; many monks reportedly arrested.
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Nyarong county (Chin: Xinlong)

Many posters were pasted in various villages in Nyarong county, carrying messages such as: “Tibet needs freedom and independence”, and “Long Live His Holiness the Dalai Lama”. Similar messages were also written on stone tablets. Gatherings have been strictly banned in the area.
(reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)

After two county government buildings were set on fire on 27 March, a group of Tibetans, who live close to where the incident occurred, were taken into custody and beaten while under interrogation.
(reported by CTA, 29 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Sershul county (Chin: Shiqu Xian)

More than 40 heads of monasteries from Sershul county were summoned by the State Administration of Religious Affairs [Religious Affairs Bureau?] to be given patriotic re-education classes. All 40 monastery heads failed to comply with Chinese demands to participate in the classes.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

Monks’ quarters in Kirti monastery were thoroughly searched by PSB and PAP personnel; monks confined their living quarters. Items relating to the Dalai Lama including portraits were confiscated. All documents were examined. Over 100 monks from Kirti monastery were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)

“Large numbers” of PAP personnel arrived at Kirti monastery and a “huge number” of monks were arrested.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

Hundreds of PAP and PSB personnel arrived at Kirti monastery [either on or soon before 28 March], dispersed devotees and visitors gathered around the monastery compound, and ordered surrounding shops to be shut down. Around 30 Tibetans arrested several days previously were paraded around the streets in a military truck to intimidate and discourage locals from undertaking further protests. Two monks identified as Ven Lobsang Tenzin and Ven Lobsang Chodhar of Kirti Monastery were among the group in that truck. A two-day raid on Kirti monastery by PAP and PSB personnel commenced on 28 March.
(reported by TCHRD, 01 April 2008)

Weapons and ammunition were found in Kirti monastery, including 30 guns, 498 bullets, 4 kilograms of gun powder and 33 swords. Pornographic discs were also discovered in the raid.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 03 April 2008)

Police seized a total of 30 guns, 498 bullets, four kilograms of explosives and a large amount of knives from Geerdeng [Tib: Kirti] monastery, as well as communication facilities including satellite phones, receivers for overseas TV channels, fax machines and computers. In the bedrooms of some monks, “police also captured flags of ‘Tibetan-government-in-exile’ and banners written ‘Tibet Independence’”. Twenty-six suspects were “caught for alleged involvement in a riot on 16 March that caused a chaos in Aba [Tib: Ngaba] … some of the suspects had confessed that the riot, masterminded by the Dalai clique, was organised and premeditated, aiming at undermining public order and misleading world opinion soas to sabotage the Olympic Games and ethnic unity”.
Nyigeme, who is in charge of the monastery, said there are 600 registered monks but, he said, “there are at least 1,000 monks in the monastery now as there are always visiting monks from elsewhere like Qinghai and Gansu provinces”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 29 March 2008)

Morning: hundreds of PAP and PSB personnel dispersed devotees and other visitors gathered around the monastery compound and ordered surrounding shops to shut down. At around noon, PAP and PSB forces stormed the monastery; monks were prohibited from leaving their rooms; then each room was raided in search of Dalai Lama portraits and ‘incriminating’ documents. At around 5pm, at least a hundred monks were known to have been forcibly taken away by the armed forces to Ngaba County PSB Detention Centre. The monastery is reportedly surrounded by sandbag barricades erected by PAP personnel.
(reported by TCHRD, 28 March 2008)

A strong contingent of PAP and PSB personnel stormed Ngaba Kirti monastery in search of incriminating materials; they ransacked each and every room, “insulting and harassing the monks”. Portraits of the Dalai Lama on display at the monastery prayer wheel hut “were either pierced, torn, scrubbed or removed by the officials during the raid”.
(reported by TCHRD, 09 May 2008)

At 11am, thousands of black and green uniformed Chinese security forces entered six monasteries in the Amdo region (Sichuan Province). Five of the monasteries are in Ngapa county: Ngaba Kirti monastery, Ngatue Amdu monastery, Gomang monastery, Dongri monastery and Tsennyi monstery; the sixth, Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, is in Dzoege county.
Security forces raided each monk’s room and confiscated all cell phones; monks were interrogated and forced at gunpoint to step on photographs of the Dalai Lama. Security forces staged and videotaped monks of Kirti monastery [unclear if Ngaba Kirti monastery or Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery] in their rooms as they were forced to hold up a portrait of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan national flag. A small monk was “forced to hide half his body underneath the wooden floorboards and made to place his hands on the keyboard of a laptop computer”.
One of the monks made a secret phone call to Kirti monastery in exile (Dharamsala, India), stating: “I am worried that the CCP is creating false evidence to try to show that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the mastermind behind the protests in Tibet. The security forces forced us to act out these scenes against our will with guns pointed at us […] Do not be persuaded by these fake videos”.

(reported by Kirti monastery (Dharamsala, India), 30 March 2008)

“On March 28, ammunition was found in the Kirti Monastery in Aba county […] The weapons included 30 guns, 498 bullets, 4 kg of gun powder and 33 swords. Pornographic discs were also discovered in the raid”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 03 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Taktsang Lhamo, Dzoege county (Chin: Ruoergai Xian)

At 11am, thousands of black and green uniformed Chinese security forces entered six monasteries in the Amdo region (Sichuan Province), including Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery in Dzoege county (the five other monasteries are in Ngapa county: Ngaba Kirti monastery, Ngatue Amdu monastery, Gomang monastery, Dongri monastery and Tsennyi monstery).
Security forces raided each monk’s room and confiscated all cell phones; monks were interrogated and forced at gunpoint to step on photographs of the Dalai Lama. Security forces staged and videotaped monks of Kirti monastery [unclear if Ngaba Kirti monastery or Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery] in their rooms as they were forced to hold up a portrait of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan national flag. A small monk was “forced to hide half his body underneath the wooden floorboards and made to place his hands on the keyboard of a laptop computer”.
One of the monks made a secret phone call to Kirti monastery in exile (Dharamsala, India), stating: “I am worried that the CCP is creating false evidence to try to show that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the mastermind behind the protests in Tibet. The security forces forced us to act out these scenes against our will with guns pointed at us […] Do not be persuaded by these fake videos”.

(reported by Kirti monastery (Dharamsala, India), 30 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

At 11am, thousands of black and green uniformed Chinese security forces entered six monasteries in the Amdo region (Sichuan Province). Five of the monasteries are in Ngapa county: Ngaba Kirti monastery, Ngatue Amdu monastery, Gomang monastery, Dongri monastery and Tsennyi monstery; the sixth, Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery, is in Dzoege county.
Security forces raided each monk’s room and confiscated all cell phones; monks were interrogated and forced at gunpoint to step on photographs of the Dalai Lama. Security forces staged and videotaped monks of Kirti monastery [unclear if Ngaba Kirti monastery or Taktsang Lhamo Kirti monastery] in their rooms as they were forced to hold up a portrait of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan national flag. A small monk was “forced to hide half his body underneath the wooden floorboards and made to place his hands on the keyboard of a laptop computer”.
One of the monks made a secret phone call to Kirti monastery in exile (Dharamsala, India), stating: “I am worried that the CCP is creating false evidence to try to show that His Holiness the Dalai Lama is the mastermind behind the protests in Tibet. The security forces forced us to act out these scenes against our will with guns pointed at us […] Do not be persuaded by these fake videos”.

(reported by Kirti monastery (Dharamsala, India), 30 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Chamdo Prefecture (Chin: Changdu) » Nyera monastery, Pashoe county (Chin: Basu Xian)

Tsewang Dorjee, a monk from Nera monastery, posted a number of posters at a number of sites, including the Pasho county government headquarters and on some large rocks near Nera monastery. On the posters, among other things, he demanded more religious freedom in Tibet, called for a Free Tibet and the return of the Dalai Lama. Tsewang Dorjee was arrested after returning to Nera monastery.
(reported by CTA, 30 March 2008)

A monk named Tsering Dorje from Nyera monastery was detained by Chinese armed police after he put up posters in the county government centre, demanding religious freedom and the return of the Dalai Lama. He is believed to have been detained in the local county jail. Over a hundred monks from Nyera monastery set out to the county centre to demand his release, but were persuaded by the abbot and senior monks not to go.
(reported by sources to RFA, 02 April 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

The butchers’ shops on Beijing Road were just beginning to re-open for business on Friday; Lhasa residents face inflation.
Inflation reached a 12-year high in February.
A Tibetan woman who runs a small grocery store just off Beijing Road said she had been forced sharply to raise the price of packaged noodles: “It is the fault of my Han Chinese supplier. He is taking advantage of the problems to raise prices”.
Opposite the clutch of butchers, six police in riot gear blocked the entrance to the road [Ramoche Road] leading to Ramoche monastery, where protests on 14 March are believed to have started. Foreigners in the neighbourhood were regularly asked to produce identification.
(reported by FT.com, 28 March 2008)

The Chinese have condemned reports that they used excessive force against peaceful protesters, saying that the 19 deaths on 14 March were caused by the rioters. Champa Phuntsok, chairman of the Tibet Autonomous Region told visiting diplomats on Friday night that police have detained more than 414 people, and 289 turned themselves in for participating in the riot and of those, 111 have been released.
(reported by Washington Post Foreign Service, 29 March 2008)

In response to international condemnation of the March violence, the Chinese government permitted fifteen diplomats to visit Lhasa [28-29 March], but seriously restricted their ability to speak freely to Tibetans, visit those in detention, or otherwise investigate aspects of the protests.
(reported by HRW, 16 June 2008)

A notice issued by the TAR government said:

  • The families of the 18 civilians killed in the 14 March riot are to be compensated 200,000 yuan (about US$28,170) for each victim.
  • All of the injured could enjoy free medical treatment.
  • Measures are to be taken to help people repair their homes and shops damaged in the unrest or to build new ones (according to official statistics, 908 stores were smashed, looted or torched and 120 homes were burnt, causing losses of nearly 250 million yuan). The government will provide interest-free or government-subsidised loans to help businesses resume.

    (reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 28 March 2008)

Police closed off Lhasa’s Muslim quarter on 28 March, two weeks after [one of] the city’s mosques was burned down during anti-Chinese protests. It was not clear why the area was cordoned off. Officers blockaded surrounding streets, allowing in only area residents and worshippers observing the Muslim day of prayer. According to the China Tibet Information Center, there are an estimated 1,500 Muslims in Lhasa. A heavy security presence continued in other parts of Lhasa’s old city as clean-up crews waded through the destruction inflicted when days of initially peaceful protests turned deadly on 14 March.
(reported by AP, 28 March 2008)

A 15-member diplomat delegation visited Lhasa on 28-29 March, the first group of foreign diplomats to visit since the 14 March riot. The diplomats came from Beijing-based embassies and diplomatic missions of Brazil, Japan, Germany, Canada, European Union, Italy, Spain, Slovenia, Singapore, Tanzania, United Kingdom, Australia, France, Russia and the United States. China’s Foreign Ministry and the TAR government arranged the trip.
Friday afternoon: the delegation visited Yishion Clothes Store on Beijing Middle Road, where five young girls were burnt to death in the riot; “The shop boss and a girl who survived the fire answered questions from the diplomats. The survived girl told in detail what had happened in the afternoon of 14 March, as foreign diplomats required”.
The delegation then visited the Second Middle School of Lhasa, “which was partially burnt in the riot”. The schoolmaster described how rioters burnt school buildings, and efforts to evacuate students and teachers.
George Manongi, minister of the Tanzanian embassy in China, “said he felt very sad while seeing the burnt houses and wounded innocent people”. He said, “Those ‘peaceful protests’ were in fact ended up with violence. No government will tolerate this”.
Friday evening: TAR chairman Qiangba Puncog [Tib: Jampa Phuntsog] met the delegation; told them the “violent incidents were created by the ‘Tibet independence’ forces and organised, premeditated and masterminded by the current Dalai clique with the vicious intention of undermining the upcoming Beijing Olympics and splitting Tibet from the motherland. He said police authorities had detained 414 suspects … and another 289 turned themselves in. Among them, 111 had been released for minor offence”.
Xinhua reported that at least 18 civilians, including an eight-month infant, and one police officer had been confirmed killed; there were also 382 injuries.
Counsellor of the Slovenian Embassy in China Bernard Srajner said he was satisfied at Qiangba Puncog’s remarks; what he saw showed Lhasa is “a normal city”.
(reported by Chinaview (Xinhuanet), 29 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Toelung Dechen county (Chin: Duilongdeqing Xian)

Bodies of Tibetans [killed during 14 March unrest in Lhasa] were collectively cremated in Toelung.
(reported by CTA, 07 June 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Nagchu Prefecture (Chin: Naqu) » Shapten monastery, Driru county (Chin: Biru Xian)

Government ‘work teams’ arrived to conduct ‘patriotic re-education’ classes; a large number of troops arrived; the classes lasted until 2am.
(reported by CTA, 29 March 2008)

  Thursday, 27 March 2008
  Gansu Province » Kanlho TAP (Chin: Gannan) » Chone county (Chin: Zhuoni Xian)

A Chinese woman living in the county in the southern part of Gansu province, told RFA: “They detained a lot of Tibetans. Those who committed serious crimes are being detained. Those whose offences were not so serious have been released […] [Those who were detained] were being hauled to our side of the county one car load after another”.
(reported by sources to RFA, 27 March 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Golog TAP (Chin: Guoluo) » Darlag county (Chin: Dari)

Five hundred Tibetans from Ponkor Toema and Tibetans from Ponkor Mema townships in hiding on a nearby mountain since 26 March and surrounded by Chinese security forces were encouraged to surrender and promised leniency. On 27 March, two Tibetans voluntarily surrendered but were severely beaten and tortured.

During the following weeks, hundreds of Tibetan protesters were arrested by the Chinese security forces. [unclear whether or not TCHRD is referring to the Tibetans from Ponkor Toema and Tibetans from Ponkor Mema townships who sought hide-outs on a nearby mountain]. Many of them were later released from detention but were charged a hefty fine of 20,000 RMB (US$2,500).

(reported by TCHRD, 29 April 2008)

  Qinghai Province » Tsolho TAP (Chin: Hainan) » Holkha township, Tsigorthang county (Chin: Xinghai Xian)

No report of protests, but at around 3pm, hundreds of additional PAP and PSB personnel arrived in military trucks arrived at the township market place “to check a further outburst of protest”. Military troops in several rows were seen patrolling the streets; later, four people were arrested for unknown reasons. They are Malle and Tsekyab Gyal, both male, in their late twenties, from Holkha township, and two Tibetan businesswomen from other parts of Tibet. Their whereabouts unknown. The atmosphere in the township remained tense.
(reported by TCHRD, 03 April 2008)

Locals gathered in front of the Holkha township headquarters and demanded the release of Ribum Gyal, a guitarist, and a young girl who were arrested during the demonstrations on 26 March [25 March?]. No details available regarding any releases.
(reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)

At least six hundred Tibetans gathered in front of the township government building and protested peacefully, demanding the unconditional release of the three Tibetans arrested on 26 March. They promised to continue their protests until those detained were released.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Kardze TAP (Chin: Ganzi) » Chokri Getse township, Draggo (Drango) county (Chin: Luhuo Xian)

Chinese authorities held a public meeting in Chokri Getse township “to denounce the Dalai Lama”. An old lady, Ama Tsangloe, stood up and shouted out that the Dalai Lama was the religious leader of all Tibetans and that she would not denounce him; she shouted slogans calling for his return to Tibet. The township secretary kicked and dragged her from the meeting; her son, Yeshe, attacked the secretary with a knife. Ama Tsangloe and the secretary both received treatment in hospital.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Dzoge county (Chin: Zoige Xian)

Date unspecified, circa 27 March: Laypeople arrested by Chinese troops.
(reported by CTA, 27 March 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Kirti monastery, Ngaba county (Chin: Aba Xian)

A monk committed suicide in the days following the 16 March protest [date unspecified by ICT; other reports indicate 27 March].
(reported by ICT, 03 April 2008)

A monk named Lobsang Jinpa, originally from Ngasib Ka-nyak village in Ngaba county, committed suicide; he left a suicide note that stated: “I do not want to live under Chinese oppression even for a minute, leave aside living for a day”.
(reported by CTA, 05 April 2008)

Hundreds of armed police entered Kirti monastery; around eight or nine troops took control of each monk and his residence, and searched for material considered “anti-Chinese” such as Tibetan flags and Dalai Lama photographs; the monks were confined to their rooms.
(reported by Tibet Watch, 01 May 2008)

A Kirti monastery monk named Lobsang Jinpa (originally from Ngasib village in Ngaba) committed suicide on 27 March. In his suicide note he stated: “The Chinese government has levelled false allegations against the monks of Kirti monastery for leaking state secrets to the outside world, leading and organising the protests and for keeping the dead bodies of Tibetan protesters shot dead by the Chinese security forces. However, all the charges levelled by the Chinese government were not committed by anyone in Kirti Monastery, but carried out solely by me […] I led the peaceful protest, and I am solely responsible for the protest […] I do not want to live under the Chinese oppression even for a minute, leave aside living for a day”.
(reported by TCHRD, 04 April 2008)

A 32-year-old monk at Geerten [Kirti] monastery hanged himself in his room.
(reported by The Times, 04 April 2008)

  Sichuan Province » Ngaba T&QAP (Chin: Aba) » Thangkor monastery, Dzoege county (Chin: Ruo'ergai Xian)

Date unspecified, circa 27 March: Monks arrested by Chinese troops. Work teams arrived at Thangkor monastery to pressurise the monks to sign confessions stating that they had “wrongfully” taken part in pro-independence demonstrations; monks refused to sign.
(reported by CTA, 27 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Jokhang temple

A small group of foreign journalists, including an AP reporter, were taken to Lhasa on a three-day government-organised trip . The tightly scripted visit was disrupted when 30 monks pushed into a briefing being given by officials at the Jokhang temple on Thursday, complaining of a lack of religious freedom and denouncing official claims that the Dalai Lama orchestrated the March 14 violence. “What the government is saying is not true”, one monk shouted; another said “They [Chinese security forces] killed many people”. One of the monks said the death toll was far higher than the government was saying: “The cadres and the army killed more than 100 Tibetans. They arrested more than a thousand”. The outburst lasted for about 15 minutes before government officials ended it and told the journalists it was “time to go”. Baima Chilin, vice governor of Tibet, later told reporters the monks would not be punished. State TV showed the foreign journalists’ Jokhang visit but not the monks’ outburst.
(reported by AP, 28 March 2008)

A select group of foreign reporters, chosen by the Chinese government, were taken for a government-managed tour. During the group’s visit to Tsuglag-khang (Jokhang) temple, three senior monks of the temple, pre-selected by the authorities, were to interact with the foreign reporters. The other monks were instructed to engage in ‘normal’ monastic activities while the media group was present. However, numerous monks disrupted the tour. During the 15-minute outburst, the monks shouted that there was no religious freedom in Tibet and that the Dalai Lama was not to blame for inciting the demonstrations in Tibet.
(reported by CTA, 28 March 2008)

Comments made by Tibetan monks to foreign journalists on Chinese government-arranged trip:
“The CCP tricked the people”.
“The government is always telling lies, it’s all lies”.
“They killed many people. They killed many people”.
“They (the government) has destroyed the way we are seen by the people”.
“The cadres and the army killed more than 100 Tibetans”.
“They arrested more than a thousand”.
“There were monks and lay people, both”.
“We want freedom and we want peace”.
“But after you leave, we are probably going to be arrested”.

(reported by AP, 28 March 2008)

30 to 40 monks raging against China’s criticism of the Dalai Lama and state limits on their religious freedom defied government officials, stormed a carefully orchestrated visit by foreign reporters at the Jokhang temple. The “weeping and shouting” monks stood before Chinese authorities and branded them as liars, upset that a government administrator from the temple was “recounting how Tibet had been a part of China for centuries”; particularly incensed that the reporters were being escorted by Communist Party officials planted as monks. One young monk yelled: “Tibet is not free! Tibet is not free!” and then burst into tears. They seemed particularly anxious to convey that the Dalai Lama was in no way to blame for the recent violence. One said: “They want us to crush the Dalai Lama and that is not right”. Another added: “This has nothing to do with the Dalai Lama.” They told the reporters that they had not been allowed to leave the temple since the first non-violent demonstrations by monks from a temple on the edge of Lhasa on 10 March. Troops guarding the temple were removed the night before the visit. Government officials said later that the monks would not be punished.

According to a lay Tibetan, the armed security guarding the temple had “disappeared” during the morning; he saw men burning incense at two altars outside the temple; recognising them as plain-clothed police, asked if he could enter the temple. One said: “Go in quickly. It’s open now.” He then witnessed a monk shouting and weeping in front of the foreign reporters. The eyewitness was ordered to leave as soon as the monks began shouting.
Later, the area around the Jokhang was sealed off by PAP personnel wearing helmets and carrying shields; only those who live in the narrow lanes around the temple were allowed to enter the area.
A journalist working in Beijing for a Western television station, and who was refused permission to visit Tibet with selected foreign journalists taken to Lhasa on a three-day government-organised trip, told RFA: “None of the major television media outlets were selected. The only exceptions were AP television, which only provides video footage without actual reporting, and Al Jazeera Arabic. Al Jazeera English was not invited”.

(reported by The Times, 28 March 2008)

A group of monks disrupted a media briefing at the Johkang [Jokhang] temple during a three-day visit to Lhasa by reporters from 19 domestic and foreign media organisations. TAR Chairman Qiangba Puncog [Tib: Jampa Phuntsog] later (9 April 2008) told press in Beijing that the monks who spoke to foreign reporters were not punished: “They are still in [the] Johkang [Jokhang] temple and will be if they do not participate in any law-breaking activities such as beating, smashing, robbing and burning”. He added that China will not punish anyone for expressing their opinions to the media. “I think it is natural for some lamas to have their own opinions and talk to the media […] but what they said is not true”. Citing a monk saying that the “authority killed more than 100 people in Lhasa”, Qiangba Puncog said that “the monk himself later said he learned this from the Voice of America”.
(reported by Xinhua/China Daily, 09 April 2008)

About thirty young monks at the Jokhang temple stormed into a news briefing by a temple administrator for a select group of foreign journalists on a stage-managed tour, the first journalist allowed into Tibet since the uprising. The monks, some weeping, crowded around cameras; they accused the officials of lying, and shouted “Don’t believe them. They are tricking you. They are telling lies”. The monks said they had been barred from leaving the temple since 10 March. “They just don’t believe us. They think we will come out and cause havoc – smash, destroy, rob, burn. We didn’t do anything like that – they’re falsely accusing us”, said one monk; “We want freedom. They have detained lamas and ordinary people”.
The incident last for about fifteen minutes; police then took the monks elsewhere in the temple, away from the journalists. The journalists were then told, “Your time is up, time to go to the next place”.
Reuters was not invited on the government-organised trip but received news from USA Today’s Beijing-based reporter Callum MacLeod; Reuters’ article referred to footage shown on Hong Kong’s TVB channel and comments mad by Wang Che-nan, a cameraman for Taiwan’s ETTV.
(reported by Reuters, 27 March 2008)

  Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) » Lhasa Municipality » Lhasa

Final day of a three-day government-organised, tightly scripted Lhasa trip for a small group of foreign journalists. Regarding the monks who interrupted the reporters’ visit to the Jokhang temple the day before, Fu Jun, head of the News Affairs Office of the Propaganda Department of the Tibet Communist Party, told the reporters: “We are keeping an open mind about their complaints. The rumour is misleading the media without a shred of evidence. …We will clear up facts in a few days’ time when appropriate”.
On Friday morning, the journalists were taken to interview members of the Communist Party-run Buddhist Association, who reiterated the Chinese accusations against the Dalai Lama.
Following international pressure, the Foreign Ministry is allowing a group of foreign diplomats to visit Lhasa on Friday and Saturday; a U.S. diplomat will join the trip.
(reported by AP, 28 March 2008)

Having blocked media from entering Tibet since the [14 March] riots, the government invited a small group of reporters, including the FT, to visit Lhasa on a two-day trip. Government officials told reporters that the disturbances had ended and political order had been restored. But on Thursday a group of 30 Buddhist monks interrupted a briefing in the Jokhang Temple shouting “Free Tibet” and other slogans. The young monks claimed reporters were being manipulated; security restrictions around the temple had only been lifted for the visit. Indeed, the area around the temple was completely blocked off on Friday morning to everyone other than residents living inside the police perimeter – as it had been on several other occasions during the two days.
Baima Chilin, deputy governor of Tibet, said that evidence showing that the Dalai Lama was involved in provoking the protests would be presented in “due course”.
(reported by FT.com, 28 March 2008)